Taiwan Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


Skywatcher

Captain
As the saying goes, steel is cheap. It probably isn't that more expensive for Taiwan to built something that size (I think it's only 10,000 t?) than something a bit smaller.

It's probably also even useful in peacetime, as last year China played silly buggers by closing HK's airspace to a Taiwanese transport flying into the SCS "for reasons". Having more options to resupply outlying islands is therefore a good idea.
The problem with building a LHD vs. another LPD is that there's no real reason why the ROCN needs to deploy more helicopters to the Pratas and Spratlys than a LPD can carry (regardless of how much more a LHD costs, the extra helicopters will cost a lot more).
 

siegecrossbow

Brigadier
Staff member
Super Moderator
It's for the SCS islands, I believe, so it has some actual military utility.

The LHD is a crazy idea (though still more useful than those next generation DDGs that sensibly seemed to have been dropped).

I think submersible platforms are a much better investment.
 

Mr T

Senior Member
I think submersible platforms are a much better investment.
If Taiwan was wasting money on several of these amphibious warfare ships I would agree. But so far it's just one, which isn't really going to break the bank.
The problem with building a LHD vs. another LPD is that there's no real reason why the ROCN needs to deploy more helicopters to the Pratas and Spratlys than a LPD can carry (regardless of how much more a LHD costs, the extra helicopters will cost a lot more).
Do you actually need to have helicopters permanently assigned to an LHD, though? Surely they can just transfer them between ships as needed. It's unlikely the ROCN is going to set sail with every ship it has at the same time and thereby tie up every naval helicopter it has.
 

siegecrossbow

Brigadier
Staff member
Super Moderator
If Taiwan was wasting money on several of these amphibious warfare ships I would agree. But so far it's just one, which isn't really going to break the bank.

Do you actually need to have helicopters permanently assigned to an LHD, though? Surely they can just transfer them between ships as needed. It's unlikely the ROCN is going to set sail with every ship it has at the same time and thereby tie up every naval helicopter it has.

The ROCN budget is stressed as is. Every little bit would count.
 

siegecrossbow

Brigadier
Staff member
Super Moderator
Unless it's some sort of submersible surface combatant(for the better half of the century - purely theoretical concept) - their tasks don't intersect.

I meant investing in asymmetric capabilities (conventional or even midget subs) is a better investment in LPDs. If China were to attack Taiwan, it wouldn't be content with just the islands in the South China Sea.
 

Skywatcher

Captain
Unless it's some sort of submersible surface combatant(for the better half of the century - purely theoretical concept) - their tasks don't intersect.
The problem with submersible surface combatants is that in modern surface warfare, you need to have a substantial superstructure constantly above the water line (sensors such as radars, comm suites, and helipads). Also, you'd have to rate the VLS for underwater launch, which increases expense and complexity.
 

Mr T

Senior Member
I meant investing in asymmetric capabilities (conventional or even midget subs) is a better investment in LPDs. If China were to attack Taiwan, it wouldn't be content with just the islands in the South China Sea.
I understand where you're coming from. However, I don't think we should assume that China will definitely go all in from nothing. There could be political reasons to annex SCS islands, such as to test the US' response and try to demoralise Taiwanese people. Maybe it wouldn't happen before the next US election but if Biden's successor is looking potentially weak I can imagine Beijing doing it as a "safe" way to figure that new President out.

Then there's a question as to how much capacity Taiwan has for increasing submarine capabilities. I don't think it could hurry up the prototype submarine much without the danger of compromising the build even with more money. Once the prototype is completed more money might be helpful to create another production line to increase the pace of the build. But that's years off even if it's a good idea.

As for a completely new design, that would also take years to complete and complicate matters. I doubt Taiwan has the spare staff to build smaller submarines alongside the current program even if blueprints could be produced quickly. Much like with the current indigenous submarine, foreign assistance would be required. Does Japan, the US and Europe have the experience and equipment necessary to help? Taiwan could probably build something but would it be valuable or incredibly noisy/unreliable and easy for the PLAN to find and sink?
 

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