Hong-Kong Protests


Gatekeeper

Brigadier
Registered Member
My impression had always been there were strong pro-China sentiment or attachment in Hong Kong - not necessarily pro-CCP or even pro-PRC for very understandable reasons. That is, until in recent years, particularly during last year's protest/violent movement. I was struck by the raw hatred and vitriolic attacks against anything mainland China. These had gone beyond political/ideological level, but had felt more at the racial/civilizational level. What is ironic is that these kinds of rhetoric and behaviors were displayed more by the very younger generation - generation that has grown up after the handover, whereas in earlier generations you didn't get this kind of feeling.

I suppose It'll take another 25 years effort to "bring back" the future generations.

Yes you're right. There's always been pro-China sentiments in Hong Kong. You're also right this doesn't mean pro-CCP. It could also be pro-KMT. This was the case in the days when Taiwan still professes to be representative of China.

Together these two groups probably made up 80% of the population (My observation when I was a kid growing up in Hong kong).
But now this has been reduced but still substantial size remains. It is certainly not the minority as the MSM trying to portrait.

However, they are silent, in more ways than one. I posted a short video of the clean up of university of Hong Kong not long ago. (There is longer version of the video). This video proves that these people hated what the thugs done to the city. But are afraid to say or do anything because of the threatening behaviour of the thugs. But now with the national security forcing the thugs back into their holes. These people only now feels safe enough to come out to make their feelings known.

So these thugs were exercising the freedom given to them to intimidate and force their will on others. In the process take away everyone else's freedom.

So much for freedom that our friend here keeps harping on about!
 

Gatekeeper

Brigadier
Registered Member
Mine is in Taiwai. That said although I hail from an indigenous family, I'm a bit of a 鬼仔 (to all my non Chinese speaking SDF friends, its basically the Cantonese derogatory term equivalent of the n-word, except we're using it on a white person). I did got to local school (funny enough many of my classmates are children of Hong Kong politicians and other big figure types), but my parents raised me fairly western. English was my first language (I really should be ashamed at where my fluency, or lack thereof, even though I like to think I hold my own in a Canto/Mandarin), despite the fact my grandfather threatened multiple times to cut my balls off if I brought a blonde or brunette home. :p


I was brought up a bit of a righty in the thought of Thatcher and Reagan conservatism. As such I expected so much more out of Trump and May/BoJo (I voted Tory in the last two elections) when they came into power... Safe to say I've been massively disappointed, and it only makes my heart bleed red for the Motherland.

Anyways I've had multiple conversations with my neighbors, friends, and colleagues here in the UK about my thoughts on what's happening to my home. The overwhelming consensus I get is that they've never heard of my side/version of the story. I honestly don't even know what its going to take for our side of the story to be reported by the media, but like you said, it's hard to present your point to someone when they've already made up their mind and are unwilling to listen to what you have to say.

What really bugs me the most is that these so called China and Hong Kong "experts" have:
1) Barely, if not ever, stepped foot into Hong Kong or China (let alone Xinjiang, but I digress) to report whats actually happening on the ground
2) Haven't even bothered to learn the historic facts and their implications on modern developments
3) Add a Chinese translation of their English name onto their Twitter bio to make them seem like they know their shizzle
4) Know a couple Chinese characters (not even any fluency in the language?!), and are able to use CTL+F to find terms in Chineses document that they can twist to fit their anti-PRC narrative
5) Quick to dismiss any rebuttals or opinions that go against their "truth"
6) When faced with someone that might actually be able to go toe-to-toe with them, use their literacy of both spoken and written English to drown out their opponents that most of the time aren't as fluent in English
7) All seemingly backed by political or private interest groups/lobbies, but yet are quoted all over the headlines

Ranting aside, we unfortunately live in a white man's world. I wish something could be done to change it, but I guess that's the way the world is. I've figured the best thing to do is to outperform expectations, and as I mentioned in a previous post, 為中華民族發揚光大 (rough translation: shine for our fellow Chinese brothers and sisters). I'm sure when the world starts recovering from the pandemic (and they come crawling with their tail between their legs begging for foreign investment like David Cameron did with his "Golden Era" with China), at some point they'd have to acknowledge what the Chinese nation state has managed to achieve, and to let our accomplishments drown out the media's anti China narrative.

Taiwai. Two stations away. I'm surprise that English is your first language. It is little wonder that they called you foreign devil. I would've thought your first language is hakka. Mine should be, but to my shame, I can only speak Cantonese due to the fact I was brought up and educated in kowloon. Where Cantonese are widely spoken.

In any case some of my peers in our Chinese association also refer me as foreign devil or 'banana' in a friendly jovial way because of my perceived knowledge of English and the English cultural. Lol
 

plawolf

Brigadier
We have freedom of expression here, so do people in China. Maybe you can get 'dissapeared' in China if you criticized certain things, but most of them are happy with their government, so who are we to say they are oppressed?

Sorry, but that’s just western propaganda BS.

Firstly, not one person has ever been permanently ‘disappeared’ for criticising the Chinese government. They might be held for a time while under investigation, but at the end of that period they are either released or formally charged.

Secondly, it is exceptionally rare for ordinary Chinese citizens to get investigated for merely bad mouthing the government. Usually the only people who the Chinese police bother to investigate are those who are foreign financed and/or directed and who are actively working to undermine the Chinese government and rule of law at the behest or hostile foreign powers. News flash, people like that would get treated little differently if they were operating in any ‘free’ western country. Hell, if you were operating in the US and got caught, you can truly be disappeared into a foreign CIA black site or your local ICE concentration camp.
 

crash8pilot

Junior Member
Registered Member
Taiwai. Two stations away. I'm surprise that English is your first language. It is little wonder that they called you foreign devil. I would've thought your first language is hakka. Mine should be, but to my shame, I can only speak Cantonese due to the fact I was brought up and educated in kowloon. Where Cantonese are widely spoken.

In any case some of my peers in our Chinese association also refer me as foreign devil or 'banana' in a friendly jovial way because of my perceived knowledge of English and the English cultural. Lol
As far as I was told, the last person that spoke Hakka in the family was my great-great grandmother. My family moved to Hong Kong Island shortly after I was born, even though my grandparents still live near the old village. We were going to immigrate prior to the Handover (we stayed at the end), and so my parents thought it sensible to raise me with English as my first language. Most of our family friends are expats too, and our family still speaks English around the house unless I'm in trouble lolz. Gonna sound super snobbish, but I went to a band 1 school in the Mid Levels, so even though not quite international school, we still spoke a bit of English in and out of the classroom.

I really ought to be ashamed of my level of Chinese fluency (I can still hold a conversation, but I read about 80%, and can comprehend like 60% of what I read on the first go... which is just about enough to get through a restaurant/takeaway menu lolz), but watching the protests as well as all the China-bashing makes me feel more nationalistic/patriotic, and I've definitely embraced my Chinese identity even more. That's a sentiment I've been noticing amongst my old classmates that also like me, left to study/work abroad. The way we see it, we've made something of ourselves when we left abroad, and now it's time to take what we've learnt and achieved abroad to benefit Hong Kong and the Motherland, despite what a certain someone (dare I suggest he's probably never stepped foot on Hong Kong or the Mainland, and fully bought into Western zionistic malarkey that the Mainland is an oppressed agricultural third-world country) has to say. Truthfully we're more enlightened than the west puts it - after 4.5 years studying in the US and the past 5 years studying/working in the UK, I'm telling you first hand the grass sure as shit isn't greener.
 

Mr T

Senior Member
The way we see it, we've made something of ourselves when we left abroad, and now it's time to take what we've learnt and achieved abroad to benefit Hong Kong and the Motherland

I'm curious, how do you as an airline pilot plan to benefit ordinary people in Hong Kong or mainland China? Are you going to take poorly paid work on some remote route that's short of pilots? No chance you'll be applying to work with an airline that pays top dollar?

And are your doctor friends planning to work in public hospitals in low-tier Chinese cities that are short of skilled doctors and also get bad pay, or would their return to China be contingent on getting a job in a private hospital where wages are better?

As for the investment brokers.... sorry, I have no idea how they're going to make things better in any scenario.

fully bought into Western zionistic malarkey that the Mainland is an oppressed agricultural third-world country

Nice strawman, and yes I have been to China. I never said China was third world or agricultural. It's obviously an industrialised country. But it's an objective fact that there are fewer rights/freedoms there compared to the developed world. You might not care about those freedoms, but it doesn't mean they don't exist.

Truthfully we're more enlightened than the west puts it - after 4.5 years studying in the US and the past 5 years studying/working in the UK, I'm telling you first hand the grass sure as shit isn't greener.

Given you don't appear to care about personal rights or freedoms other than making money, that's hardly surprising. Presumably if the HK police rammed your child into the pavement because they ran away out of fear you'd be cool with that.
 

Mr T

Senior Member
dare I suggest he's probably never stepped foot on Hong Kong or the Mainland, and fully bought into Western zionistic malarkey

People who normally prattle on about Zionist conspiracies or the influence of "global Zionism" usually share views with certain people that lived in 1930s and 1940s Germany.

crash8pilot, do you have a problem with Jewish people?
 
Given you don't appear to care about personal rights or freedoms other than making money, that's hardly surprising.
If that were the case, one should go to the US to be a doctor; but those who value their freedoms and honor go to China even for a heavy pay cut. Unfathomable for someone with a Western-rotted mind like yours even when told by Chinese people who have lived all over the world, eh? Having fun talking to yourself validating your own assumptions? LOL

Presumably if the HK police rammed your child into the pavement because they ran away out of fear you'd be cool with that.
I'd apologize profusely to the police and promise to be a better father for raising human trash that not only doesn't support the country but has become a burden and tool of hostile foreigners. But I'm not worried; my family specializes in discipline and we have never faltered in educating our kids.

Presumably, if your child was protesting peacefully against police killings when s/he was beaten and tear-gassed before shoved into an unmarked van by people with no badges or documentation, you'd be cool with that and still go on rapping about how much "freedoms" you have. LOL
 
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Mr T

Senior Member
One other thought. People like Crash8pilot who live(d) in democratic countries enjoyed freedoms they took for granted. For example, in China apps like Whatsapp are banned. So you need to use Wechat. But if other countries had the same rules as China, people like Crash couldn't use Wechat to talk with people in China. Similarly, I guess when he was in the US and UK, he didn't just read domestic newspapers, but he used his freedoms to read pro-CCP newspapers and watch pro-China news channels on the TV. He didn't need a VPN and he had the legal right to watch what he wanted. If he used the internet to express his views, they weren't censored for being pro-CCP or anti-US/UK.

That's totally fine, but to say things like "those freedoms are worthless" is peculiar if you're using them on a regular basis.

If that were the case, one should go to the US to be a doctor

Crash was saying he and his friends were planning to go back to China to "benefit" it. I don't mind where people choose to go to work, but if they say they're doing it to help others I'd like to know if he's going to take a lower paid job to help out those who most need it or if he's just going to look after himself by taking the highest paid job available. I'm not aware that China is suffering from a shortage of airline pilots.

I'd apologize profusely to the police and promise to be a better father for raising human trash that not only doesn't support the country but has become a burden and tool of hostile foreigners.

You'd assume all that because your child bought some crayons?

But I'm not worried; my family specializes in discipline and we have never faltered in educating our kids.

If your parents would punish you for buying crayons it sounds like you were a victim of child abuse when you were younger, sorry to hear that. :(

Presumably, if your child was protesting peacefully against police killings when s/he was beaten and tear-gassed before shoved into an unmarked van by people with no badges or documentation, you'd be cool with that and still go on rapping about how much "freedoms" you have.

That doesn't happen in the country I live in. Seriously, do you think the world consists of just China and America?
 
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