What the Heck?! Thread (Closed)


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solarz

Brigadier
...but the lioness still killed mommy.

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Not sure why people are amazed by this behavior. Animals are wild. Eventually the lioness probably would've killed the baby. Chasing off the male lion could be just protecting her snack for later on. I've seen a house cat licking a mouse it was playing with like grooming it but then later that mouse would end up dead and not eaten.
Yup, they're just projecting human intentions onto animals. That's the biggest problem with organizations like PETA: they believe animals have human needs and desires.
 

AssassinsMace

Brigadier
The irony is if a human did that, it would be seen as horrific and extremely cruel. I believe there was a case where a woman killed a pregnant woman who was soon to give birth and cut the baby out and took off with the "new born."
 
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ahho

Junior Member
An A-10 Warthog copy is what I see, albight without the gattling gun in the middle of the nose.:p
Something came to my mind when I see this bird in green. Does the A-10 and this SAAB design look like He-162 but in double engine config
 

plawolf

Brigadier
Well, first off, this is a real serious story, but its contents are so incredulous I thought it best to post it here.

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What if a major US city's police department drastically reduced the number of arrests it made and fines and citations it issued, and no one noticed?

Such seems to have been the case in New York City last month, as police officers apparently began a deliberate work slowdown - labelled a "virtual work stoppage" by the New York Post, which first reported the numbers (independently confirmed by the BBC).

For the week of 22 December, citywide traffic tickets dropped 94% from the same period in 2013. Court summons for low-level offences, like public intoxication, also dropped 94%. Parking tickets were down 92%. Overall arrests were down 66%, as well.

The proximate cause of the slowdown, according to the Post, was the murder of two New York police officers - Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu - by a gunman who had taken to social media earlier in the day to cite police abuses in New York and Ferguson, Missouri, as his motivation.

Other police concerns appear to be at play, including the the department's rocky relationship with New York Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

The NYPD needed to be reminded that chain of command exists, and that they are not at the top of it”

Ben Domenech
The Federalist
"Police sources said Monday that safety concerns were the main reason for the drop-off in police activity, but added that some cops were mounting an undeclared slowdown in protest of de Blasio's response to the non-indictment in the police chokehold death of Eric Garner," the Post reporters write.

The New York Daily News found that the two police precincts where the murdered officers worked issued only one ticket or criminal summons in the seven days following the attack, down from 626 made during the previous week.


New York Mayor Bill de Blasio is said to be facing an "open rebellion" in his city's police force
The massive drop in law enforcement has prompted a mix of concern and - perhaps surprisingly - hope among some police critics. The hope is revealed as some commentators wonder whether the public at large will start viewing the previously high levels of police activity as unnecessary for keeping the city safe.

They've used the opportunity to push back against the "broken windows theory" of law enforcement, in which low-level crimes are vigorously prosecuted as a way to prevent the occurrence of more major infractions. The principle has been a staple of New York City policing since Rudy Giuliani became mayor in 1994, but has been criticised as leading to a disproportional punishment of minorities.

Several writers point to a particular line in the Post piece - that police are now "turning a blind eye to some minor crimes and making arrests only 'when they have to'" - as prime evidence of ongoing police overzealousness.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

It's tough to run a protection racket when people don't feel threatened”

Harry Siegel
New York Daily News
"Well, we can only hope the NYPD unions and de Blasio settle their differences soon so that the police can go back to arresting people for reasons other than 'when they have to'," Scott Shackford of the libertarian Reason magazine wryly notes.

One of those "other" reasons numerous critics on the left and right point to is the financial boon for city coffers that comes from fines and court fees generated by law enforcement.

The police slowdown "shines a light on the use of police officers to make up for tax shortfalls using ticket and citation revenue", writes Rolling Stone's Matt Taibbi.

"It's wrong to put law enforcement in the position of having to make up for budget shortfalls with parking tickets, and it's even more wrong to ask its officers to soak already cash-strapped residents of hot spot neighbourhoods with mountains of summonses as part of a some stats-based crime-reduction strategy," he continues.

What if these latest developments show that the New York police can "safely cut arrests by two-thirds", asks the Atlantic's Matt Ford. The implications are immense, he says. Fewer people could be arrested and sent to prisons that often have brutal conditions.

"A brush with the American criminal-justice system can be toxic for someone's socioeconomic and physical health," he says.

The New York Daily News's Harry Siegel writes that while New York police have "real reasons to be upset" about Mr de Blasio's efforts to expose law enforcement officers to greater criminal prosecution, they shouldn't have launched this "unprecedented, deeply disturbing, police rebellion".

He compares the slowdown to attempted extortion. "Nice city you got here," he writes. "Be a shame if something happened to it."

But with crime in the city dropping in 2014, and the streets apparently calm even during the latest police (in)action, the move could backfire.

"It's tough to run a protection racket when people don't feel threatened, and New York ended 2014 with new lows in murders, rapes, burglaries, grand larcenies and robberies," he writes. "For over 20 years, crime has dropped as the NYPD has doubled and redoubled its enforcement efforts. At some point, the chemo is deadlier than the cancer."

The Federalist's Ben Domenech goes even farther, calling the police move a threat to democracy more reminiscent of a Latin American coup d'etat.

"The NYPD needed to be reminded that chain of command exists, and that they are not at the top of it," he writes. "Instead, what New York City is experiencing now amounts to nothing less than open rebellion by the lone armed force under the worst kind of weakened junta, one led by a figure ideologically radical and personally weak, who has lost control of his bureaucracies and may soon be devoured by them."

There are clearly storm clouds looming over New York City. But will the end result be newly discovered silver linings or an impending deluge?
This article is like a case study of a lot of things that are fundamentally wrong and rotten with American law enforcement.

You have corrosive and probably corrupt practices of law enforcement effectively extorting money from some of the poorest people in society to make up for shortfalls in city and even police department budgets through "over-zealous" enforcement of minor offences or even legalised highway robbery as is the case with many if not most civil forfeiture seizers.

That creates a climate of mistrust and resentment by the people to the police, which can lead to violence against the police, as the tragic murder of those two officers are a vivid example of.

Then you have a toxic police 'buddy' culture where the police close ranks to protect their own irrespective of whether their fellow officers might have done something wrong or not, often taking the law into their own hands in doing so. That leads to even more mistrust and resentment, and move hostility towards the police, which in turn makes them close ranks more, and often employ more brutal enforcement methods than necessary or warranted.

Its a vicious circle that has created a relationship that is actually more like an occupying foreign force and the occupied rather than the protect and serve relationship the police are supposed to have with the public.

I think that is one of the reasons why there was such a strong reaction to the police reaction in Ferguson recently, as that image of the police looking like a military occupation force struck a chord with many Americans even if they did not consciously recognised that's what current US police often feels like to millions of Americans.
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
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Interesting Concept by Sabb

well there are similarities.
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but in terms of concept and role it's night and day. the Saab concept resembles A10 because that design is optimized for CAS. the straight broad wing gives good lift for short take off the twin above the wing engines protects there intakes from ground fire. The double tail allows it to take damage to the tail surfaces well still operational. the Cockpit offers all around armor.
He 162 was designed as a Cheap fighter with good guns fast construction and fair maneuverability it has a reverse swept wing it's tail is not straight but up swept and designed to give clearance to the engine exhaust. It was meant to be nimble, fast and disposable.
 

Jura

General
well there are similarities.
...
seeing He-162 and What the Heck?! ... something came to my mind: in an incredibly high-tech attack, an unknown bomber-version of German jet-powered Me-262 at 1740 hours of May 6, 1945 hit "with surgical precision" (this term unknown 70 years ago, heck) the Prague building of the Czech Radio (the objective was to shut down the broadcasting ASAP) with a 500 kg bomb ... they were careful not to cause collateral damage because they were attacking in the area (which is downtown Prague!)
(a picture from the Czech Radio Archives:
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;
for the background you may visit
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)
 
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delft

Brigadier
Well, first off, this is a real serious story, but its contents are so incredulous I thought it best to post it here.

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This article is like a case study of a lot of things that are fundamentally wrong and rotten with American law enforcement.

You have corrosive and probably corrupt practices of law enforcement effectively extorting money from some of the poorest people in society to make up for shortfalls in city and even police department budgets through "over-zealous" enforcement of minor offences or even legalised highway robbery as is the case with many if not most civil forfeiture seizers.

That creates a climate of mistrust and resentment by the people to the police, which can lead to violence against the police, as the tragic murder of those two officers are a vivid example of.

Then you have a toxic police 'buddy' culture where the police close ranks to protect their own irrespective of whether their fellow officers might have done something wrong or not, often taking the law into their own hands in doing so. That leads to even more mistrust and resentment, and move hostility towards the police, which in turn makes them close ranks more, and often employ more brutal enforcement methods than necessary or warranted.

Its a vicious circle that has created a relationship that is actually more like an occupying foreign force and the occupied rather than the protect and serve relationship the police are supposed to have with the public.

I think that is one of the reasons why there was such a strong reaction to the police reaction in Ferguson recently, as that image of the police looking like a military occupation force struck a chord with many Americans even if they did not consciously recognised that's what current US police often feels like to millions of Americans.
Parliament ( Federal, State Congress, City Council ) protects the citizens in a functioning democracy from such unreasonable persecution by the State. That has been the first duty of Parliament, even before supervising the finances of the State, from the introduction of Parliaments in Europe in the Middle Ages in statelets in what is now the South of France. After all if the state can get its money by robbing the people why would it ask parliament for financial aid.
 

delft

Brigadier
Yesterday I was thinking about airliner crashes - not strange at this time. I looked at the crashes of Lockheed Constellations in KLM service: of 48 in service with that company seven crashed. In only one case all occupants survived but in most all perished. KLM used 15 DC-7C's of which none crashed despite using the same unreliable ( at least according to our norms ) engines as the later Constellations. I remember a KLM DC-7C having an engine fire and seeing that engine drop into the North Sea after which the aircraft landed on Schiphol.
In the fifties air travel was already safer than other forms of travel but that has since been improved dramatically.
 
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