Taiwan Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


adeptitus

Captain
VIP Professional
I'm surprised that this deal actually went off at all, considering all the thing that could have gone wrong. However, mainly because the US doesn't really have diesel sub building capability readily available, this might take a while to come to fruition. Perhaps the Taiwanese will obtain an upgraded version of whatever the last US diesel sub was and produce it in Taiwan.
The last USN diesel submarine warship in service was probably the Barbel class, built in 1950s. Someone had already edited the wiki entry for Barbel class to speculate that the US might either sell plans for this sub, or build an upgraded version for ROCN:
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But I'm really iffy on this 50+ year old design...

Ideally, I'd like to see TW obtain plans and tech assistance from HDW/Germany for local build/assembly. Type 212 w/tech transfer is probably impossible, so Type 209 (or even downgraded 214) is more likely. I'm not very optimistic however.

I believe TW's defense industry is perfectly capable of constructing planes, ships, subs, tanks, missiles, etc. Certain high tech components may require import (i.e. high performance aircraft engines), but they should be able to handle the integration and assembly like S. Korea. CSC has already proven itself in constructing 8 OH Perry class Frigates locally.

It may cost more to do local construction, but in the long run it's better than taking hand-me downs or beg other countries to sell to you. Buying completed weapon systems is often controversial and mired in politics, but license production plans, components, sub-assemblies, etc. are smaller ticket items individually and may have better chances of slipping through.
 

Clouded Leopard

Junior Member
Military spending to increase 16.4% next year


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The Cabinet approved a 4.4 percent increase in government spending for next year with more than a fifth of the NT$1.7 trillion budget earmarked for Taiwan's growing military program.

The budget approved by the Cabinet yesterday morning projects a NT$97.9 billion deficit in 2008 based on an estimated 7.6 percent rise in government revenues to NT$1.6 trillion, the Directorate General for Budget, Accounting and Statistics said.

The budget still requires legislative approval, but its military spending provisions could make that difficult.

The government has requested a defense funding increase of 16.4 percent to NT$341 billion, and includes NT$19.2 billion to purchase military hardware such as P-3C Orion anti-submarine patrol aircraft and NT$10 billion to purchase fighter jets.

The Legislature didn't pass the 2007 budget until June, in part because of disputes over a weapons package offered by the United States in April 2001, which has been in limbo in the lawmaking body since approved by the Cabinet in June 2004.

Taiwan is boosting defense spending to keep up with China, whose defense budget rose a record 17.8 percent to 350 billion yuan (US$46 billion) this year.

Defense accounts for the largest share - 20.1 percent - of Taiwan's spending plans for next year.

Education will claim the second largest slice of the budget, with NT$318 billion earmarked, up 2.3 percent from this year, followed by social welfare spending at NT$298 billion, up 0.7 percent. The social welfare spending includes an increase of NT$1.67 billion for elderly welfare subsidies and a new national pension for the handicapped and an NT$8.46 billion increase in living allowances for aged farmers.

Economic development will take the third largest chunk of proposed government spending at NT$202 billion, up 0.8 percent, the DGBAS said.

Some NT$77.3 billion is set aside for the central government's "Project for the Expansion of Public Construction for 2008," which includes NT$15 billion for a center of excellence project for top universities, NT$7.4 billion for national historical and cultural centers, NT$5.6 billion for the M-Taiwan project to enhance the country's telecommunication and internet service infrastructure, NT$6.9 billion for transforming the Taiwan Railway Administration into a short-haul metropolitan mass rapid transit system, NT$9.3 billion for freeway construction, NT$22.7 billion for metro system development in northern, central and southern Taiwan, NT$8.1 billion for sanitary sewer construction, and NT$2 billion for water supply improvement projects.

Although unsubstantial, a potential flash point in the budget is the additional NT$20 million earmarked for the president's state affairs fund that would restore it to its original NT$50 million level. Taiwan's first lady is currently on trial for allegedly misusing the fund, while President Chen Shui-bian (陳水扁) was spared an indictment for the same offense because of his presidential immunity.

In the wake of the allegations, the opposition-controlled Legislature cut the fund by NT$20 million in 2007.

The Cabinet also approved a 10-measure proposal to save energy and develop reusable energy, including encouraging motorists not to drive one day each week, the statement said.
 

Clouded Leopard

Junior Member
Taiwan's AIDC proposes future fighter

By Siva Govindasamy
28/08/07

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Taiwan's Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation (AIDC) is studying the development of a successor to its F-CK-1 Indigenous Defence Fighter (IDF), with the so-called F-CKX to enter service by the end of the next decade given approval by the nation's defence ministry.

Government funding is necessary for the project to go ahead and AIDC could ask for it from the 2009 fiscal year, says chairman Kent Feng. For now, the company's first priority is to get funding for the upgraded IDF, which AIDC calls the F-CK-2. "These upgrades are essential for the F-CK-1 fleet. We've test flown two aircraft now, and we hope to get the budget to go ahead with them from the 2008 fiscal year," says Feng.

Upgraded and new fighters are essential for Taiwan's air force, with its Northrop F-5s in need of replacement and around half of its Dassault Mirage 2000s grounded due to a lack of spare parts. Taipei wants to buy 66 Lockheed Martin F-16C/Ds to bolster its fleet of around 130 F-16A/Bs, but the $1.3 billion deal is unlikely to be approved by the US administration until next year. It is also interested in Lockheed's F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, but is not a programme partner and will be low in the exports priority list. Some observers estimate that the earliest it would get the F-35, if it is even allowed to due to the design's use of stealth materials, will be well into the 2020s.

"Taiwan needs to replenish its air force in the next decade and our next-generation fighter could be the answer. A new aircraft would take at least 10 years to develop, so we must start now," says Feng, who concedes that AIDC needs massive investment if it is to gain the technological know-how and industrial capability to design and produce a new fighter. Collaboration with foreign partners is possible, and Feng says: "If Western companies want to help us, we are willing to talk to them."

However, Whether western manufacturers would be willing to work with the company is another issue, says one Taipei-based observer. "I don't see how the legislature will give its approval for such a big project, given that all military procurements are facing difficulty in getting funding, and especially when it would be far cheaper to just go and buy new aircraft outright," the observer notes.

"Next, all Western manufacturers now have a good relationship with China, and the USA is keen on good ties with the mainland as well. Would they risk that by helping Taiwan build a new fighter? I doubt it. This project will be an uphill task for AIDC and Taiwan."
 

Finn McCool

Captain
Registered Member
This is excellent news for the Taiwanese Air Force. They need an indigenous fighter so they do not have to jump through hoops to get their hands on aircraft that aren't even top quality. An indigenous fighter also solves the missle and spare part shortage problem. I and several others been saying for a long time that the Taiwanese could do this and produce more weapons at home. This a major step in the right direction for them.

They will need foreign help though. Especially in engine technology. The original F-CK suffered/s from underpowered engines. I also was not aware that the Mirages were so badly off in the area of spares.
 

FuManChu

Senior Member
This is excellent news for the Taiwanese Air Force. They need an indigenous fighter so they do not have to jump through hoops to get their hands on aircraft that aren't even top quality.
Certainly a locally designed and made plane would be a great asset. It will be a difficult road but one I think that should be pursued.

I also was not aware that the Mirages were so badly off in the area of spares.
It was reported (I think in July) that was the case. However, as far as I know the problem was only due to a temporary supply problem. Spare parts were scheduled to be shipped, either arriving in September or this month to allow the fleet to be brought up to speed next month.
 

unknauthr

Junior Member
Taiwan's AIDC proposes future fighter
An interesting idea, but with a couple of holes that still need to be filled. The biggest one will be the supply of jet engines. Only a handful of nations in the world have the capability to design and produce all of the components necessary for a modern fighter engine. Taipei will need to strike a deal with one of the existing, Western jet engine suppliers if they have any shot at all of this.

If South Korea's experience is any indication, neither the US nor the Europeans are eager to spool-up another potential competitor. Taiwan would probably be offered an older, smaller engine model (F404 perhaps), to ensure that whatever airplane is produced will have limited range and limited resale value. That doesn't mean that they shouldn't consider this option, but they need to be aware of what they are signing up for.
 

Clouded Leopard

Junior Member
Supposedly the US will allow AIDC to co-manufacture the engines for the Block 52 F-16C/D if the 66-jet deal goes through. That would be a good engine. Taiwan might not be permitted to use the engines for some sort of IDF-Goshawk fighter though.
 

FuManChu

Senior Member
Supposedly the US will allow AIDC to co-manufacture the engines for the Block 52 F-16C/D if the 66-jet deal goes through. That would be a good engine. Taiwan might not be permitted to use the engines for some sort of IDF-Goshawk fighter though.
Are you talking about the IDF upgrade or the proposed "advanced IDF"? Also which article did you get the news that the US would allow co-production of the engines from?

Either way, AIDC being able to co-manufacture engines of the new F-16s would give them more experience that could help them developing a new engine with foreign help in the future.
 
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FuManChu

Senior Member
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There was one bit that got my attention.

Taiwan is currently pushing the U.S. government to release 66 F-16 fighters to replace its aging F-5 Tigers, and approval for 12 P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft is expected to be granted soon.
That's sounding more positive than news from a few weeks ago.
 

Clouded Leopard

Junior Member
all of this Taiwan gaining extra defence from the US is the reason there is so much stife between the taiwan strait.
Hardly. US arms sales and support help preserve the status quo (and peace); if Taiwan were allowed to become significantly weak vis-a-vis China, it could encourage Beijing to attack.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.


(Looks at Gollevainen): I hope I am not turning this too political?
 

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