Taiwan Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


Clouded Leopard

Junior Member
MND budget proves new cruise missile is in development

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By Hsu Shao-hsuen
STAFF REPORTER
Sunday, Sep 02, 2007, Page 1

Next year's budget request submitted by the Ministry of Defense (MND) to the Legislature yesterday officially revealed for the first time that the nation is developing the Hsiung Feng 3, (雄風三型) or Brave Wind 3 cruise missile.

The budget for the MND's Missile Command also revealed that the Hsiung Feng 3 is due be deployed next year.

Although the defense budget has reached 3 percent of Taiwan's GDP, the military still complains of a lack of money in a report on the five year plan to overhaul the armed forces submitted to the legislature.

The report states that the defense budget still shows a shortfall of NT$153.5 billion (US$4.64 billion) for the period between next year and 2013.

A report by the ministry on China's military strength said that Taiwan's growing democratic awareness and increasing pro-localization stance has meant that China has followed Chinese President Hu Jintao's (胡錦濤) policy to deal with Taiwan by "striving for talks while at the same time preparing to fight."

The report stated that although China's official defense budget is US$44.9 billion, the actual figure is closer to US$85 billion to US$125 billion, making Chinese military expenditure second only to that of the US.

Taiwan's military overhaul means there are plans to acquire a satellite information gathering and communication jamming systems next year and to complete studies of a low flying anti-tactical ballistic missile system this year, the report said.

Next year, the navy will begin purchases of submarine launched anti-ship missiles and develop remote-controlled mines, while the army will purchase a new type of helicopter, it said, adding that Japan will become a new focus in the country's military exchanges.
 

FuManChu

Senior Member
The budget for the MND's Missile Command also revealed that the Hsiung Feng 3 is due be deployed next year.
The article actually says:

In addition,the MND's Missile Command's increasing expenditure is being seen as an important indicator that large numbers of cruise missile,code-named Hsiung Feng-IIE ,will start production and deployment next year.

There's no confirmed news that the HF-III will be deployed next year.

So what do we have so far in news for 2008 and in the budget?

  • HF-IIE Will enter service next year
  • HF-III development continuing/reaching production stage?
  • Purchase of submarine-launched anti-ship missiles
  • "New helicopter", reported elsewhere as being 30 AH-64s and 60 UH-60Ms
  • Funds for the P-3C Orions, PAC-3, SSKs and F-16s

It's interesting to hear that the HF-IIE will enter service, more so that Taiwan is going to buy anti-ship missiles for submarines. Does this mean the 2005 study into modifying the Hai Lungs was successful? Or can this be seen as a vote of confidence in the US-built SSK programme?

Of course this could be another screw-up by reporters in confusing them with the ROCAF's purchase of Harpoons. Doubtless we shall find out in the coming weeks.
 
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Finn McCool

Captain
Registered Member
It's interesting to hear that the HF-IIE will enter service, more so that Taiwan is going to buy anti-ship missiles for submarines. Does this mean the 2005 study into modifying the Hai Lungs was successful? Or can this be seen as a vote of confidence in the US-built SSK programme?

Of course this could be another screw-up by reporters in confusing them with the ROCAF's purchase of Harpoons. Doubtless we shall find out in the coming weeks.
I was intrigued by that as well. I never heard any news claiming that the Hai Lungs were modified. If this purchase of missles is for hypothetical US-built SSKs, then I think the ROCN is getting a bit ahead of itself. If that is indeed what these missles are for they will probably be sitting a warehouse for years, and might not even end up being used on a actual submarine.
 

FuManChu

Senior Member
I never heard any news claiming that the Hai Lungs were modified.
I didn't say they had been modified. Only that there was a study taken on by a US company to see whether it was possible.

EDIT: In retrospect I see this more and more as a case of a reporter not understanding the difference between the two sorts of Harpoons.
 
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Violet Oboe

Junior Member
Regarding military topics the Taipei Times is a very unreliable source since their unabashedly pro Minjindang (DPP) stance often influences the papers articles by wishful thinking.

Indeed those sories about HF-3 and ´modified´ Hai Lung SSK's are at least imaginative...:confused:
 

FuManChu

Senior Member
Indeed those sories about HF-3 and ´modified´ Hai Lung SSK's are at least imaginative.
The Taipei Times has never said the Hai Lungs were modified. As to the HF-III, the news they carry is normally repeated or similarly reported by other Taiwanese media regardless of political leanings. Of course if you'd like to be more specific rather than just make vague claims....
 
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Clouded Leopard

Junior Member
KMT Defense White Paper:


A New Military for a Secure and Peaceful Taiwan

(Summary)

Kuomintang (KMT), 2007

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n National Security Conundrum:
The DPP’s provocative policy toward de jure independence has been creating tensions in the Taiwan Strait. In the face of growing PRC military capabilities, the DPP’s policy serves to strengthen Beijing’s determination against Taiwan, while impairing Taiwan’s international assistance, weakening our defense, and softening the popular morale and will to fight.



n Our Defense Vision:
The KMT’s defense policy is aimed at safeguarding national security and pursuing cross-strait peace, regional stability and domestic prosperity. If elected to power, we will strengthen our defense without being provocative in the cross-strait relations. We will try our best to maintain the status quo, resume cross-strait dialogue in order to avoid miscalculation and accidents, and assure peace in the Taiwan Strait and the well-being of the Taiwan people.



n Defense Aims:
We will build a new military based on a defensive “Hard ROC” strategy. We will harden up our defense to an extent that is unshakable with our high morale, undefeatable by blockade, unoccupiable under invasion, and uncrackble with our sustained resistance. When a war is unavoidable, we will effectively use our advantages in force, space and timing. We will attempt to win the first stage of conflict through rapid employment of forces, disturbing the enemy’s tempo of operations, and gain more time for international assistance.



A New and Strong Military


1. The force size, structure, and military infrastructure must be periodically reviewed. Effectiveness of national command, joint operation and joint staff composition prescribed in the Two Defense Laws will also be evaluated.

2. We will build a lean and strong military. Logistic and support systems must be broadly modernized. Training and exercises, especially of the live fire kind, should be increased and refined.

3. Officers’ professionalism, leadership and military virtues must be reinforced. The depth and breadth of civil-military and international interactions must be enhanced. It is also needed to help the officers and soldiers to develop high quality civilian skills and boost up their self-confidence and social status.



n An All-Volunteer System


1. We will enlarge the proportion of volunteers to conscripts in the armed forces. An all-volunteer system shall be realized in 4 to 6 years. We will recruit highly qualified and motivated youth into our new military. The minimum salary of solders will be at least double of the lowest wage prescribed by the Labor Law. Soldiers and sergeants of ground combat forces will be assigned and deployed near their registered residences to the extent possible.

2. Men and women will not be drafted in the peacetime, but will be mobilized at war time. By modifying current laws and regulations, qualified nationals at the draft age will only need to receive military training for three months in the summer and winter time. Such training is compulsory for the male but voluntary for the female. At war time, they will be organized as ground reserve force immediately.

3. To improve veteran services for work, study and living after their discharge or retirement, we will prepare our uniformed men and women with comprehensive programs, from their entry to exit, rendering them worry-free after completing their services. We will draft and pass bills similar to the Montgomery G.I. Act in the US, in order to financially satisfy veterans’ medical, employment, and study needs.



n Reinvigorate Our Will and Spirit to Fight


1. The military are armed forces of our nation, the Republic of China. Our military should be always loyal to our country and steadfastly safeguard security of the Taiwan area.

2. To reshape a tough military spirit, those dishonest, false, toady, and obsequious deeds must be strictly prohibited.

3. Great respect should be paid to the glorious tradition of our military. A strong sense of honor must be fostered. And we will promote the most talented and competent people to high ranks and positions, thereby creating a high-quality Officer Corps.

4. We will significantly improve military living standard and salaries, and raise morale among soldiers.



n Rationalize Defense Budget


1. Defense requirements, financial reality, cross-strait relations and public opinion are four cardinal considerations in shaping our defense budget. Actual defense spending will depend on the progress of the implementation of the all-volunteers system. In principle, however, the defense expenditure will not be lower than 3 % of the GDP.

2. The ratio of expenses on personnel, operations, and military investment will be 4: 3: 3 in the breakdown of defense budget. Special budget should not be used expect for unexpected circumstances.



n Improve Military Armament


1. To counter Mainland China’s military modernization, we must continue to import advanced weapon systems from abroad. This is also essential to maintaining our asymmetric advantage for the sake of Taiwan’s security.

2. We should flexibly utilize the governmental and commercial approaches for the arms transactions.

3. We will increase our military research and development spending and try to develop our own high performance and precision weapon systems.

4. We will strengthen our defense industries by effectively using technology transfers and industrial cooperation prescribed in the arms transactions.



n On Peace in the Strait


1. We demand that Beijing withdraw its missiles aimed against Taiwan.

2. We will initiate military-to-military exchanges, and negotiate to establish confidence-building measures (CBM) mechanism.

3. We will negotiate with Beijing on a peace accord in order to keep the Taiwan Strait peaceful and prosperous.



n On the nuclear weapons


1. We support denuclearization of the Taiwan Strait as well as East Asia.

2. We reiterate our long-standing and basic position of not developing nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction.

3. We will faithfully abide by all regulations in the UN Resolution 1540, passed on April 28, 2004, including preventing proliferation by not helping any country or non-state actor to develop nuclear, chemical and biological weapons.
 

akinkhoo

Junior Member
the move to a all-volunteer is a good one, with the people somewhat split between to fight or not to fight... forcing people into conscription in peacetime will not raise any morale, adds to the risk of having surrender or mass defection when you REALLY needed them.
 

Clouded Leopard

Junior Member
True, but I have to wonder whether Taiwan has the enthusiasm or resources necessary for an all-volunteer force. Already, few people want to be in the armed forces.


An all-volunteer force needs a lot more money for pay, benefits, and extras than a conscription force does.
 

FuManChu

Senior Member
"I hate to get all technical on you guys, but - all hands on deck! Swirly thing alert!"

(The Cat - Red Dwarf)

The good news we had been waiting for is finally here - Congressional notification for the P-3C Orions. If anyone asks, the SM-2 missiles are to give the Kidds a full load as their missile order was cut by the Taiwanese legislative yuan at initial purchase.

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The Pentagon announced Wednesday possible sales to Taiwan of a dozen P-3C Orion anti-submarine patrol aircraft and SM-2 anti-aircraft missiles worth more than 2.2 billion dollars.

"The proposed sale will help improve the security of the recipient and assist in maintaining political stability, military balance and economic progress in the region," the Defense Security and Cooperation Agency said in a statement.

It said the sale of 12 excess P-3C aircraft with engines and other equipment and three non-operational aircraft to be used for spares would cost 1.96 billion dollars if all options were exercised.

The DSCA, a Pentagon agency, also notified Congress of a possible sale to Taiwan of 144 SM-2 Block IIIA Standard missiles valued at as high 272 million dollars.
 
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