QBZ-191 service rifle family


by78

Brigadier
It could also be a picture of a testing field for the modifications and attachments or even a leaked photo of dummy weapons for a movie or something like that. The reason is that we have never seen PLA SOF and to a certain degree PAP SOF equipped to this extent.

Given the sheer variety of other weapons, I assume that the QBZ-191s are real, though some parts of them look a bit suspect to me. For example the side picatinny rail piece on the side of the handguard of the QBZ-191 sitting closest to us, it appears a bit different and the guns themselves look a bit... rubbery.
This might just be the picture as I can't see why they would try to put a fake or practice QBZ-191 among other real guns.

This particular Weibo poster definitely works in the small arms industry. In what capacity, that I don't know. His Weibo feed features many genuine weapons, including models that are or were under testing but are not in service. That's not to say the QBZ-191s in this most recent image are real. The hand guards look too shiny and is of different design from what we had seen so far. It's possible they're the realistic training dummies we've heard about. Another possibility is that they are tinkering further with different hand guard designs and associated accessories. For all we know, these two examples could even be earlier prototypes from the rifle's develop stage.
 

by78

Brigadier
The new issue of Small Arms Magazine possibly hints at an inside look at the development of the new assault rifle by the 208 Institute. The issue is dedicated to the 60th anniversary of the 208, and promises to detail the institute's achievements and product developments. I will keep you all posted when images and texts become available.

 

plawolf

Brigadier
Does anyone know why QBZ-191 doesn't have a folding stock? I'm not a firearm expert, but with PLA getting increasingly mechanized, I think a folding stock looks pretty enticing for the cramped confines of the IFV and Mengshi.

In addition to the excellent points already raised, I think the main reason the PLA is moving away from folding stocks is because it’s just not great for general military applications.

With most folding stock guns, you either need to unfold the stock, which takes time, or shoot with folder and have terrible accuracy, especially on burst and full auto modes.

Folding stocks are probably most useful for SMGs in the civilian and law enforcement arenas, since the much less powerful cartridges used, and the likely much closer engagement ranges negates much of the accuracy issues with firing the weapon pistol style; while you get the maximum benefits for conceal carry purposes.

Another factor to consider is that folding stocks tend not be adjustable, which is more of an issue on full length assault rifles compared to small SMGs. Especially for general issue en mass.
 

steel21

New Member
Registered Member
In addition to the excellent points already raised, I think the main reason the PLA is moving away from folding stocks is because it’s just not great for general military applications.

With most folding stock guns, you either need to unfold the stock, which takes time, or shoot with folder and have terrible accuracy, especially on burst and full auto modes.

Folding stocks are probably most useful for SMGs in the civilian and law enforcement arenas, since the much less powerful cartridges used, and the likely much closer engagement ranges negates much of the accuracy issues with firing the weapon pistol style; while you get the maximum benefits for conceal carry purposes.

Another factor to consider is that folding stocks tend not be adjustable, which is more of an issue on full length assault rifles compared to small SMGs. Especially for general issue en mass.
I would not be surprised if the QBZ-191 has an ability to swap out stock component much like the G3.

Also, I think the QBZ-191 might be able to use AR-15 pistol grips.
 

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TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
I would not be surprised if the QBZ-191 has an ability to swap out stock component much like the G3.
That again comes back to how the weapons bolt carrier group reciprocate.

The question is how far does the bolt go in its cycle. G3, MP5 and the legacy HK rifles have a short receiver extension vs AR10, AR15. This short extension means that all you really have is a cap at the end of the extension onto which the stock models are affixed. This means you can fit the double wire telescoping stock like MP5, a fixed stock, M4 style or a folder. If however the extension and reciprocal stroke is longer like an M4 than it becomes more difficult. You can replace the Stock module but it’s all really just a shoe for the receiver extension which is the foot. Unless you conduct some major changes to the extension then the size of the stock module is limited to a fixed minimal size. Like trying to fit a size 6 shoe on a size 9 foot, unless you are into foot binding it’s not an option.
If we were talking about CS/LR 17 rifles or QBZ03 okay no problem good to go. These are designed around a mechanical system that evolves from the Type 81 rifle they were designed to have a folding stock capacity.
the QBZ191 though it seems is based on a different concept. The suspected early prototype of the system had an implied recoil cycle like an AR. This demands a larger stock boot.
farther I would point out that during the launch of the new rifle and what we have seen of the type we have three versions. The compact, the Carbine and the DMR. All three have the same stock. Troops in the parade who might have been issued an even smaller version of one was available had SMG with wired telescoping stocks.
That makes me more so suspect a fixed degree of flexibility in the furniture here. First because it’s so new, Second because realistically for a weapon that will only be built for the PLA why make it more complicated?.
 

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