News on China's scientific and technological development.


vincent

Senior Member
Parler.com nearly died because it outsourced its whole IT operation to the cloud. You say that a near-death expericence is "not a good metric"? Do you want the Mainland Chinese companies to copy Parler's stupid action?
Parler.com would have gotten kicked off the net regardless whether its servers are on-prem or on the cloud. Thus its fate is not a valid example of "cloud-based is bad"
 

Nutrient

Junior Member
Registered Member
Parler.com would have gotten kicked off the net regardless whether its servers are on-prem or on the cloud. Thus its fate is not a valid example of "cloud-based is bad"
The fact is that Parler.com outsourced its IT to a cloud provider. In doing so it took on a lot of extra risks (compared to having its own servers). Its near-death experience is something China's companies should learn from and avoid.
 

BrightFuture

New Member
Registered Member
The fact is that Parler.com outsourced its IT to a cloud provider.
Parler didn't outsourced its "IT", it probably just switched from one server provider to another. Most companies (especially small ones like Parler) rarely own and maintain their own servers.

In doing so it took on a lot of extra risks (compared to having its own servers).
The point remains, clouds aren't bad. If anything, develop domestic cloud services is the right thing to do.

Parler would have gotten shut down regardless of begin hosted by Amazon, other server provider, or themselves. If the US government, its intelligence agencies, and so want you out, you are going to go out. If anything, Parler should have hosted its website in a place out of reach of the US, like China.

Its near-death experience is something China's companies should learn from and avoid.
Yes, they learned to develop their clouds, and only trust domestic server providers.
 

FriedRiceNSpice

Senior Member
The fact is that Parler.com outsourced its IT to a cloud provider. In doing so it took on a lot of extra risks (compared to having its own servers). Its near-death experience is something China's companies should learn from and avoid.
Avoiding the cloud is equivalent of having an auto manufacturer to design and manufacture all the nuts and bolts as well as every single part used in their vehicles. Sure, they will have absolute security over their supply chain. They will also be out of business.

Why do you just repeat the exact same statements over and over without taking into account anyone else's points?
 

Nutrient

Junior Member
Registered Member
The fact is that Parler.com outsourced its IT to a cloud provider. In doing so it took on a lot of extra risks (compared to having its own servers). Its near-death experience is something China's companies should learn from and avoid.
It's obvious you don't know IT
It's obvious that you have no answer for my statement that any company that outsources its IT to a cloud service is taking on a lot of extra risks (compared to having its servers in-house). Parler's near-death experience is very strong evidence.
 

Nutrient

Junior Member
Registered Member
Parler didn't outsourced its "IT", it probably just switched from one server provider to another. Most companies (especially small ones like Parler) rarely own and maintain their own servers.
I don't care what Parler was doing before it went to Amazon. The fact is that Parler.com indeed went to Amazon -- and was nearly killed by Amazon. You cloud worshippers continually attempt to obscure this basic fact, because you have no answer for it. Why should a company take so many extra risks by using a cloud provider?


The point remains, clouds aren't bad.
You are just making an unsupported assertion. You have not demonstrated that clouds aren't bad.


If anything, develop domestic cloud services is the right thing to do.
The right thing for China to do is to avoid using cloud services altogether. Why take so many extra risks?

I notice that many New Members have been squealing since I started opposing the cloud services. Did I hit a sensitive nerve?
 

Nutrient

Junior Member
Registered Member
Avoiding the cloud is equivalent of having an auto manufacturer to design and manufacture all the nuts and bolts as well as every single part used in their vehicles.
False. Internet companies do not make their own computers. They do not educate their IT personnel. They build on lots of others' work. They just do not have to outsource their IT to the cloud and take on many extra risks.


Sure, they will have absolute security over their supply chain. They will also be out of business.
You guess that they will be out of business. Parler.com really was out of business for a while. Reality is stronger than your guesses.


Why do you just repeat the exact same statements over and over without taking into account anyone else's points?
Because none of you have answered my point, that any company which outsources its IT to cloud servers takes a lot of extra risks (compared to keeping their servers in-house). All of you continue to avoid this basic issue. You attempt to obscure it as much as possible, so I bring it back front and center, as Parler's near-death experience is THE basic problem with cloud providers.
 

sinophilia

Junior Member
Registered Member
I happen to have looked into the inventors in the American company Qualcomm and the number of granted patents they were involved in. Most 4G mobile phone modems have either the Qualcomm or the Samsung chips and both involve significant number of Qualcomm patents. Among the Qualcomm top 20 inventors half are of Chinese/Korean ancestries.

Company=Qualcomm, NInventor=9688, from 1990-06-19 to 2021-04-27
-----
Rank| NPatent | Name
1| 961 | Peter Gaal
2| 906 | Wanshi Chen
3| 844 | Tao Luo
4| 592 | Junyi Li
5| 577 | Hao Xu
6| 501 | Marta Karczewicz
7| 487 | Tingfang Ji
8| 369 | Yongbin Wei
9| 368 | Aleksandar Damnjanovic
10| 366 | Juan Montojo
11| 339 | Durga Prasad Malladi
12| 314 | Xiaoxia Zhang
13| 307 | Naga Bhushan
14| 293 | Jing Sun
15| 247 | Joseph Binamira Soriaga
15| 247 | George Cherian
17| 232 | Jing Jiang
18| 227 | Ye-Kui Wang
19| 223 | Gavin Bernard Horn
20| 217 | Simone Merlin
 

sinophilia

Junior Member
Registered Member
The US census has a dataset that shows the distribution of surnames among the ethnicities, e.g. Surname Lee has a higher probability (0.5778) of being non-Asian in US:

name: Lee | pctwhite 35.95 | pctblack 16.33 | pcthispanic 1.89 | PctAsi 42.22 | pctNonAsi 57.78

Thus mapping the census distribution onto the set of American Qualcomm inventor's surnames can give an estimation of the percentage distributions of the ethnicities. It is clear that in the American Qualcomm company from 2010 onwards the number of inventors with Asian ancestry exceed those with White ancestries. It is also obvious that the surname distribution for Qualcomm inventors is not the same as that for the general US population, i.e. the %Asi will be drastically underestimated.

Year %Whi %Asi
1990, 99.36 0.64
1992, 94.98 5.02
1993, 97.94 2.06
1994, 90.58 9.42
1995, 92.13 7.87
1996, 90.02 9.98
1997, 86.70 13.30
1998, 84.78 15.22
1999, 77.80 22.20
2000, 80.20 19.80
2001, 64.92 35.08
2002, 61.09 38.91
2003, 62.09 37.91
2004, 61.81 38.19
2005, 62.48 37.52
2006, 61.36 38.64
2007, 60.62 39.38
2008, 58.83 41.17
2009, 54.04 45.96
2010, 48.07 51.93 <---
2012, 39.21 60.79
2013, 38.50 61.50
2014, 39.55 60.45
2016, 32.30 67.70
2017, 34.40 65.60
2018, 31.38 68.62
2019, 26.90 73.10
2020, 24.49 75.51
2021, 23.23 76.77
 
Last edited:

Top