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Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
You can give a country everything they need to develop a turbofan in a lab, but to reliably produce hundreds of engines at scale requires extreme engineering tolerances across the entire industrial chain, which they themselves have to achieve and maintain. To produce a few turbine blades for a prototype is one thing, but to produce tens of thousands of them reliably at scale, that's a whole other level entirely. Even if India gets all the classified specs, licenses and the technology its wants today for a F119, they wouldn't be able to reliably manufacture it until 2040 probably, by which time US/EU/China would already be fielding variable cycle engines and working on the next gen motor. Turbofan manufacturing is like the pinnacle of overall industrial strength, and India isn't anywhere close to such benchmarks.
Never implied India would have it easy. And I thought it was very much common knowledge/sense that Mass production is a very different challenge compared to R&D.

But India would be listing all these when they prepare their demand ( if they have learned a thing or two). Industrialization of a powerplant is a necessity to achieve India's plans for future aircrafts with whatever fancy acronyms they come up. And India is not that incapable compared to some other countries since it seem to have atleast limited knowledge of manufacture/ Overhaul/assembly of Turbofans AL31FP, RD33, Trumansky R25 etc. So, I am not going to nitpick on the "there is a difference between mass manufacturing and R&D" and wave it against the Indians.

In a sense, Turbofans are a reflection of accumulated experience, existing base and comprehensive technological capability of a country.

This was the real reason why the original Rafale deal (for the local manufacture of a 126 aircraft) collapsed. The Indians demanded that the French guarantee the reliability of the locally produced Rafales in India. That would mean that the French would be responsible if the Indian factories failed to produce the parts reliably (even after having been given all the specs and the tech to produce them.) The French rejected the deal. This whole issue got politicized later, but the actual problem was industrial:

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Indeed, And I think it was posted here before. HAL was rated as subpar by the visiting Dassault reps or so the story goes.
 

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member

Really, that makes no sense...
It would make sense when you consider Tejas as a project rather than an Aircraft. Mig21 is an aircraft that fills a role for Indian airforce. Tejas is a failed aircraft that is being tended to still, doing its role as a project to acquire 4th Generation and further Aviation capabilities. India still has to develop and integrate 4th generation technologies ( like radar Radome, AESA, Avionics suite, etc) and they are in various stages of development.

Tejas Mark 2 would be an enlarged version of the current Tejas and Indians cross their hearts that it would replace Mig21.
 

pakje

New Member
Registered Member
But the mig is killing indian pilots every year over and over. I don't think its an exaggeration that a replacement should be fast-tracked
 

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