Indian Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


ougoah

Brigadier
Registered Member
Instead of Prithvi, China has a host of 1500km + cruise missiles, air launched ballistic missiles, ground and air launched HGVs, air launched stand off weapons, and the DF-100. All of which are in service in numbers hundreds of times greater than the number of Prithvi/Dhanush. The Indian one is a poor brute force method but uses much more materials and fuel to carry the same level of payload and yet also easier to intercept (being SRBM compared to terrain following cruise missiles and hypersonics).

Instead of buying Israeli radars or license producing them, China's domestic radar industry is actually one of its strong points and have long ago been done with the reverse engineering phase since Type 346 and various over the horizons and ground based and SAM radars for major projects. The scale of China's military developments and induction is at such a scale that despite orders of magnitude increases in domestic development and induction of new systems, there are simply too many units that require them and things to update step by step. India's development in every single military domain is not even just at a snail's pace, many simply don't even exist outside of PPT and feel good bs narratives.
 

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
Big woop these dump posts of India supa dupa and still at least 40 years behind even China. India's radars are made up of foreign AESA modules and technology. The vast majority of India's radar units are actually REBRANDED Israeli ones. 1:1 the same in some cases and often even made in Israel instead of India with license production. Has India exported a single radar unit or air defence system? Nope. China has been selling them since the 1990s and won competitions against Russian and American systems.

Haldilal I appreciate respectable responses but please don't pretend India is even close to 20 years behind China in these fields. It's not even got a real electronics or radar industry or a shipbuilding industry that is 10% of China's. India accounts for barely single digit global ship building and China is the ship builder of the world alongside South Korea.

Stop dumping post after post of what India has. If you did that, even filling posts with Israeli purchased stuff, it would be over in a few pages. If we did that with Chinese equipment, it would take dozens of pages.
I think India managed to export WLR to Armenia. But It didn't help Armenia win the war. I don't know the pedigree of the radar ( or better put, Google doesn't tell me quick enough). But here is an article on the development.
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This scathing observation catalysed the MoD into renewing efforts at acquisition and simultaneously tasking DRDO in April 2002 to commence development of an indigenous WLR, with a sanctioned amount of INR 200 Million within a timeframe of 40 months.

Aero-India 2003 saw the first prototype of SWATHI being unveiled. User-trials commenced in 2005 and in 2006, post advanced user trials, the WLR was announced to be ready for series production.



Aero India happened in February 2003. So, India suddenly got a prototype within 8 months. Incredible. That's Quicksilver speed. But there is more to the story.

India, in an all-out push to acquire this capability, subsequently inked an agreement with M/s Raytheon of US in 2002, post lifting of sanctions a year earlier- the first major Government-to-Government deal for military equipment (and part of an extended wish-list) between the two countries under the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) Program to purchase eight AN/TPQ-37 WLR. An additional four systems were ordered, with the total value of the contract topping out at a staggering US $200 million- close to INR 10 Billion even at then prevalent exchange rates! (exclamation not mine but the author's).

Very interesting development. While India says there has been no transfer of technology, the timelines just don't add up. The fact that India got a prototype radar within 8 months and the 10 billion sale to USA after lifting sanctions.
 

zxy_bc

Junior Member
Registered Member
I think India managed to export WLR to Armenia. But It didn't help Armenia win the war. I don't know the pedigree of the radar ( or better put, Google doesn't tell me quick enough). But here is an article on the development.
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This scathing observation catalysed the MoD into renewing efforts at acquisition and simultaneously tasking DRDO in April 2002 to commence development of an indigenous WLR, with a sanctioned amount of INR 200 Million within a timeframe of 40 months.

Aero-India 2003 saw the first prototype of SWATHI being unveiled. User-trials commenced in 2005 and in 2006, post advanced user trials, the WLR was announced to be ready for series production.



Aero India happened in February 2003. So, India suddenly got a prototype within 8 months. Incredible. That's Quicksilver speed. But there is more to the story.

India, in an all-out push to acquire this capability, subsequently inked an agreement with M/s Raytheon of US in 2002, post lifting of sanctions a year earlier- the first major Government-to-Government deal for military equipment (and part of an extended wish-list) between the two countries under the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) Program to purchase eight AN/TPQ-37 WLR. An additional four systems were ordered, with the total value of the contract topping out at a staggering US $200 million- close to INR 10 Billion even at then prevalent exchange rates! (exclamation not mine but the author's).

Very interesting development. While India says there has been no transfer of technology, the timelines just don't add up. The fact that India got a prototype radar within 8 months and the 10 billion sale to USA after lifting sanctions.
Pretty sus. Wondering if they just repackaged the US product with minimal efforts and put up an Indian stick.
 

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member

MiG-21 crashes in Rajasthan, IAF pilot killed​

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A MiG-21 Bison of the Indian Air Force (IAF) crashed in Rajasthan on Friday evening, killing the pilot, Wing Commander Harshit Sinha. This is the fifth crash involving a Bison jet this year. “This evening, around 8:30 pm, a MiG-21 aircraft of IAF met with a flying accident in the western sector during a training sortie...,” the IAF said in a statement. Later, in another tweet, the IAF confirmed the pilot’s death.

The crash has once again turned the spotlight on India’s longest-serving fighter plane, its safety record and the IAF’s plans to replace the ageing jets with newer ones in the coming years. The Bison is the latest variant of Mig-21 in IAF service. IAF operates four squadrons of MiG-21 Bison aircraft — a squadron has 16 to 18 fighter jets. The last of these upgraded MiG-21s are set to be phased out in three to four years.

More than 400 MiG-21s have been involved in accidents that have claimed the lives of more than 200 pilots during the last six decades, earning the fighters ominous epithets such as “Flying Coffin” and “Widow Maker”. Experts have said that more MiG-21s have crashed than any other fighter because they formed the bulk of the fighter aircraft in the IAF’s inventory for a long time.
IAF had to keep its MiG-21 fleet flying longer than it would have liked because of delay in the induction of new fighters.
 

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member

MiG-21 crashes in Rajasthan, IAF pilot killed​

View attachment 80385

A MiG-21 Bison of the Indian Air Force (IAF) crashed in Rajasthan on Friday evening, killing the pilot, Wing Commander Harshit Sinha. This is the fifth crash involving a Bison jet this year. “This evening, around 8:30 pm, a MiG-21 aircraft of IAF met with a flying accident in the western sector during a training sortie...,” the IAF said in a statement. Later, in another tweet, the IAF confirmed the pilot’s death.

The crash has once again turned the spotlight on India’s longest-serving fighter plane, its safety record and the IAF’s plans to replace the ageing jets with newer ones in the coming years. The Bison is the latest variant of Mig-21 in IAF service. IAF operates four squadrons of MiG-21 Bison aircraft — a squadron has 16 to 18 fighter jets. The last of these upgraded MiG-21s are set to be phased out in three to four years.

More than 400 MiG-21s have been involved in accidents that have claimed the lives of more than 200 pilots during the last six decades, earning the fighters ominous epithets such as “Flying Coffin” and “Widow Maker”. Experts have said that more MiG-21s have crashed than any other fighter because they formed the bulk of the fighter aircraft in the IAF’s inventory for a long time.
IAF had to keep its MiG-21 fleet flying longer than it would have liked because of delay in the induction of new fighters.
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some more images.
 
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Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
In Jai Hind India, only Muslims commit terrorism. Hindus just have very bad days.
I think these are Sikh people and not Muslims or Hindus. They want a separate country.
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And somehow also Pakistan's Intelligence agency is involved. I posted here a day ago, China doesn't need to place assets in Sri Lanka as India itself is quite porous.

Add that to a pretty big list of people who want a separate nation from free and democratic India.
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Mohsin77

Senior Member
Registered Member
What they might be suggesting here would be to offer the Manufacturing technology behind the M88 Hot section Turbines for Kaveri core or a license to use the 'process'.

You can give a country everything they need to develop a turbofan in a lab, but to reliably produce hundreds of engines at scale requires extreme engineering tolerances across the entire industrial chain, which they themselves have to achieve and maintain. To produce a few turbine blades for a prototype is one thing, but to produce tens of thousands of them reliably at scale, that's a whole other level entirely. Even if India gets all the classified specs, licenses and the technology its wants today for a F119, they wouldn't be able to reliably manufacture it until 2040 probably, by which time US/EU/China would already be fielding variable cycle engines and working on the next gen motor. Turbofan manufacturing is like the pinnacle of overall industrial strength, and India isn't anywhere close to such benchmarks.

This was the real reason why the original Rafale deal (for the local manufacture of a 126 aircraft) collapsed. The Indians demanded that the French guarantee the reliability of the locally produced Rafales in India. That would mean that the French would be responsible if the Indian factories failed to produce the parts reliably (even after having been given all the specs and the tech to produce them.) The French rejected the deal. This whole issue got politicized later, but the actual problem was industrial:

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Crang

Captain
Registered Member
You can give a country everything they need to develop a turbofan in a lab, but to reliably produce hundreds of engines at scale requires extreme engineering tolerances across the entire industrial chain, which they themselves have to achieve and maintain. To produce a few turbine blades for a prototype is one thing, but to produce tens of thousands of them reliably at scale, that's a whole other level entirely. Even if India gets all the classified specs, licenses and the technology its wants today for a F119, they wouldn't be able to reliably manufacture it until 2040 probably, by which time US/EU/China would already be fielding variable cycle engines and working on the next gen motor.

Turbofan manufacturing is like the pinnacle of overall industrial strength, and India isn't anywhere close to such benchmarks. This was the real reason why the original Rafale deal (for the local manufacture of a 126 aircraft) collapsed. The Indians demanded that the French guarantee the reliability of the locally produced Rafales in India. That would mean that the French would be responsible if the Indian factories failed to produce the parts reliably (even after having been given all the specs and the tech to produce them.) The French rejected the deal. This whole issue got politicized later, but the actual problem was industrial:

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India very advanced tho. They can produce Hyperloop train running on hydrogen @Nobaru
 

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