Indian Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


FORBIN

Lieutenant General
Registered Member
They never commissioned a frigate class equipped with VLS, only Shtil launcher arms, AFAIK none have Barak upgrades yet. The 2 Pr.11356 ships bought from Russia may change that in a few years.
He have a rate of fire 10 missiles/mn remains decent
AFAIK ? they have Barak 1, 32 on the graphic
 

Tyloe

Junior Member
He have a rate of fire 10 missiles/mn remains decent
AFAIK ? they have Barak 1, 32 on the graphic
Oops my bad, I didn't trust the graphic since Indian sources often make exaggerations. So Barak-1 VLS accommodates a much smaller space than expected. While Shtil is the primary SAM but uses a launcher arm that's less capable at dealing with multiple targets.
 

sanblvd

Junior Member
Registered Member
Barak-1 has max range of 12km... that's not much better than SeaRAM or FL-3000, and both of those 2 launcher can have up to 32 cells as well and I bet it will take a lot less space above deck then below deck Barak 1 VLS.

India have better luck buying SeaRAM instead.
 

Tyloe

Junior Member
It's a weird setup nevertheless. A point defence launch system for the primary SAM and a VLS to a local defence SAM. It's usually the other way around.
 

Tyloe

Junior Member
Apparently, Rafale M & F/A-18E/F can't operate on their current carriers, without modification and new certifications, due to lift constraints.

Despite recent reports that the two Western MRCBF competitors could operate from INS Vikramaditya in addition to the Indian Navy’s future carriers, this is simply not possible. The converted Soviet-era ‘aircraft carrying cruiser’ has two aircraft elevators that are located within the flight deck, instead of on the deck-edges, and both are too small to accommodate either the Super Hornet or the Rafale. The larger forward lift, beside the carrier’s superstructure, is 18.8 x 9.9 metres, while the Super Hornet’s wings fold to just under 10 metres and the Rafale’s wings, slightly less than 11 metres wide, do not fold at all. The aft lift is narrower, with an 8.6-metre width that is barely able to fit the MiG-29K’s 7.5-metre folded span. The Naval LCA, with a wingspan of a little over eight metres, would certainly have fit the forward lift if not the aft one – the Navy prefers for aircraft carrier elevators to be sufficiently larger than the aircraft they will carry for ease of aircraft handling and movement.

The real ‘show stopper’ for the entire MRCBF requirement, however, is the configuration of IAC-1. Unlike Vikramaditya, and like most contemporary carriers, the aircraft lifts on IAC-1 are positioned on the starboard edge of the deck allowing longer aircraft to ‘hang out’ over the water with only their landing gear on the platform. But because the carrier was designed around an air wing of MiG-29Ks and Naval LCAs, the lifts were sized for wingspans no larger than eight metres. 10 x 14 metres, to be precise. While MiG-29Ks and N-LCAs can fit on these lifts with parts of their noses or empennages hanging over the edges, the Super Hornet and Rafale once again cannot.
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FORBIN

Lieutenant General
Registered Member
HAL commences LCH production

Hindustan Aeronautics (HAL) has commenced production of the initial 15 Light Combat Helicopters (LCH) for the Indian army.

At a ceremony at HAL's helicopter production centre in Bengaluru, minister of finance, defence and corporate affairs Arun Jaitley oversaw the launch of LCH production.

The 5.8t LCH is designed with twin-tandem cockpits, a bearingless tail rotor, glass cockpit, 20mm gun in a chin turret, 70mm rockets, air-to-air missiles, and an electro-optical targeting pod. Survivability features include ballistics protection and features that minimise its visual, aural, radar, and infrared signatures.

HAL is expected to supply up to 114 LCHs to the Indian army.

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timepass

Brigadier
THE INDIAN AIR FORCE PUSHES FOR ADDITIONAL 36 RAFALE FIGHTERS

Egypt-Rafale-03-Dassault-692x360.png


The Indian Air Force (IAF) is eager to acquire an additional 36 Dassault Rafale multi-role fighters to join its 36 fighters already on order (from the $8.8 billion U.S. deal
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in September 2016).

The
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reports, citing Ministry of Defence (MoD) sources, that a follow-on Rafale order would cost 60% of the initial package’s value, which also includes weapon systems, India-specific customizations and a five-year support package guaranteeing an operational rate of 75%.

Although the notion of the IAF scaling the Rafale’s logistics and maintenance infrastructure for additional fighters was always plausible, the Times of India reported that the IAF presented additional Rafales as an alternative to the Sukhoi Su-57-based Fifth-Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA).

In the beginning of August, an MoD panel had recommended that India engage with Russia in the FGFA. The FGFA has seen some consternation in India on account of the program’s potential cost, especially with the IAF still requiring specific additions (such as an active electronically-scanned array radar).

The IAF plans to station its forthcoming Rafales to Hasimara and Ambala for positioning against China and Pakistan, respectively. If New Delhi approves subsequent Rafale batches, the IAF will augment its fleets in those air bases as each one is capable of supporting two Rafale squadrons each.

The IAF is also interested in acquiring a
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to join the Tejas in replacing the IAF’s legacy MiG-21 and MiG-27 jets. Currently, the Saab JAS-39E/F and Lockheed Martin F-16 Block-70 are the apparent frontrunners.

Notes & Comments:

The prospect of the IAF pursuing additional Rafales was to be expected. Ultimately, the fighter had been selected under the ill-fated Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) program, which had envisaged the induction of 126 fighters. The Rafale was selected to fulfill that objective, though subsequent issues regarding cost had required New Delhi to eschew the MMRCA bid and pursue 36 fighters off-the-shelf.

For its part, Dassault hopes to sell as many 200 Rafales to India over the next decade (
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). Dassault CEO Eric Trappier had hinted that subsequent orders could lead to the transfer-of-technology to enable India to take on a substantive share of the fighter’s sourcing. Besides expanding upon IAF orders, Dassault is also looking at the Indian Navy’s
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as an avenue for additional Rafale orders in the country.

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FORBIN

Lieutenant General
Registered Member
THE INDIAN AIR FORCE PUSHES FOR ADDITIONAL 36 RAFALE FIGHTERS

Egypt-Rafale-03-Dassault-692x360.png


The Indian Air Force (IAF) is eager to acquire an additional 36 Dassault Rafale multi-role fighters to join its 36 fighters already on order (from the $8.8 billion U.S. deal
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in September 2016).

The
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reports, citing Ministry of Defence (MoD) sources, that a follow-on Rafale order would cost 60% of the initial package’s value, which also includes weapon systems, India-specific customizations and a five-year support package guaranteeing an operational rate of 75%.

Although the notion of the IAF scaling the Rafale’s logistics and maintenance infrastructure for additional fighters was always plausible, the Times of India reported that the IAF presented additional Rafales as an alternative to the Sukhoi Su-57-based Fifth-Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA).

In the beginning of August, an MoD panel had recommended that India engage with Russia in the FGFA. The FGFA has seen some consternation in India on account of the program’s potential cost, especially with the IAF still requiring specific additions (such as an active electronically-scanned array radar).

The IAF plans to station its forthcoming Rafales to Hasimara and Ambala for positioning against China and Pakistan, respectively. If New Delhi approves subsequent Rafale batches, the IAF will augment its fleets in those air bases as each one is capable of supporting two Rafale squadrons each.

The IAF is also interested in acquiring a
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to join the Tejas in replacing the IAF’s legacy MiG-21 and MiG-27 jets. Currently, the Saab JAS-39E/F and Lockheed Martin F-16 Block-70 are the apparent frontrunners.

Notes & Comments:

The prospect of the IAF pursuing additional Rafales was to be expected. Ultimately, the fighter had been selected under the ill-fated Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) program, which had envisaged the induction of 126 fighters. The Rafale was selected to fulfill that objective, though subsequent issues regarding cost had required New Delhi to eschew the MMRCA bid and pursue 36 fighters off-the-shelf.

For its part, Dassault hopes to sell as many 200 Rafales to India over the next decade (
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). Dassault CEO Eric Trappier had hinted that subsequent orders could lead to the transfer-of-technology to enable India to take on a substantive share of the fighter’s sourcing. Besides expanding upon IAF orders, Dassault is also looking at the Indian Navy’s
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as an avenue for additional Rafale orders in the country.

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:cool: but 108 better :p
 

Dizasta1

Senior Member
Hmm ... that's interesting, not so long ago it was apparent that india didn't have the $$$ to buy more than 36 Rafales. But now it seems that they've found some for an additional 36 Rafales. Somehow I get the feeling that the indians will end up buying Rafales in incremental batches. As stated somewhere else on this forum (maybe this very thread), that Rafales are a "fall back" if things don't proceed as planned on their so-called FGFA program with Russia. Whatever the case, India managed to shoot itself in the foot when it had finalized the MMRCA contractor. It took a decade for this procurement to finally reach conclusion. And when it did, the vendor flat out refused to bear the responsibility of any draw backs to the aircraft if the necessary standards weren't met for the production of Rafales in india. Now here we are, with India buying Rafales instead of setting up an in-country production line.

Interesting times ahead indeed!!

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