Indian Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


siegecrossbow

Lieutenant General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!


For the first time ever, the government of Vietnam today confirmed - albeit carefully - that it has acquired BrahMos anti-ship cruise missiles from India. At a time when Delhi and China are locked in
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
, sources in the Defence Ministry denied selling the missile systems to Vietnam, though they did not want to comment on record.

The acquisition of the BrahMos
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
by Vietnam to protect its claim to the
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
, which Beijing claims entirely as its own.


Vietnamese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Le Thi Thu Hang, when asked a specific question on the acquisition of the BrahMos said earlier today, "The procurement of defence equipment by Vietnam is consistent with the policy of peace and self-defence and is the normal practice in national defence." She added that the Vietnam-India Comprehensive Strategic Partnership which includes co-operation in defence has "been making a practical contribution to peace, stability, cooperation and development in the region."

The Vietnamese government statement was widely interpreted by local media as confirmation that the BrahMos missile deal, discussed for years, has climaxed. Senior Vietnamese journalists indicated to NDTV that the first batch of missiles may have arrived a few days ago.

For the first time ever, the government of Vietnam today confirmed - albeit carefully - that it has acquired BrahMos anti-ship cruise missiles from India. At a time when Delhi and China are locked in
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
, sources in the Defence Ministry denied selling the missile systems to Vietnam, though they did not want to comment on record.

The acquisition of the BrahMos
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
by Vietnam to protect its claim to the
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
, which Beijing claims entirely as its own.

Vietnamese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Le Thi Thu Hang, when asked a specific question on the acquisition of the BrahMos said earlier today, "The procurement of defence equipment by Vietnam is consistent with the policy of peace and self-defence and is the normal practice in national defence." She added that the Vietnam-India Comprehensive Strategic Partnership which includes co-operation in defence has "been making a practical contribution to peace, stability, cooperation and development in the region."

In April this year, the Chinese People's Liberation Army Daily said, "The deployment of BrahMos missile is bound to increase the competition and antagonism in the China-India relations and will have a negative impact on the stability of the region." The armies of both countries are in the midst of a lengthy standoff on the Doklam plateau, located over the Sikkim border. China says the region belongs to it; India and Bhutan agree it's part of the tiny Himalayan kingdom. In June, Indian soldiers crossed over to stop the Chinese army from building a road that would give it strategic access to the "Chicken's Neck" - the narrow sliver of land that connects the Northeast states with the rest of India.


Vietnam has deep concerns at Beijing's rapid conversion of shoals and tiny islands into full-fledged military bases with runways for use by military aircraft. Several countries in the region in addition to the US, Japan and India have repeatedly said China should not in any way threaten or impede the free movement of shipping in what are international waterways. In 1979, both countries fought a brief but bloody war in which there were thousands of casualties with China being unable to prevent Vietnam's involvement in neighbouring Cambodia.

India and Vietnam enjoy a very close military partnership. India has trained Vietnamese sailors in Visakhapatnam to operate Russian built 'Kilo'-Class submarines which are operated by the Navies of both countries and has supplied patrol vessels. India has also been training Vietnamese soldiers at the School of Counter-Insurgency and Jungle Warfare in Vairengte in Mizoram.
 

timepass

Brigadier
>> India looks to America for aerial protection from threat of enemy rockets, drones and aircraft as the capital plans to go anti-ballistic

India is considering an American anti-missile 'umbrella' to protect the Delhi region from enemy rockets, drones and aircraft.
Seeking to provide protection to dignitaries, including the President and Prime Minister, India is looking into the system, as part of the Delhi Area Defence project.
'The National Advanced Surface to Air Missile System (NASAMS) is being considered for the Delhi Area Defence project to provide aerial protection to the capital from airborne threats,' government sources told Mail Today.

The programme is being undertaken as the threat from incoming enemy missiles, drones and aircraft is perceived to be on the rise, because of their increasing use by organisations such as the Lashkar-e-Taiba.
US defence officials have given presentations to the Air Force and other concerned agencies, and the proposal is now being considered by the government.
The same anti-missile system is used by the Americans to guard their national capital region in Washington DC and has been in deployment there since 2005.

The Indian Air Force has been using missile systems originating from Russia to help protect the national capital, as well as important assets.
The Americans claim the NASAMS as being a state-of-the-art air defence system that can maximise the ability of the users to quickly identify, engage and destroy enemy aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles or emerging cruise missile threats.
'It is owned by seven countries and has been integrated into the US national capital region's air defence system since 2005.
'In addition to the US, it is in service in Norway, Finland, Spain and the Netherlands,' said the firm which manufactures the missile system for the US government.

Government sources said this programme would be running simultaneously with the indigenous Ballistic Missile Defence shield project, under which protection would be provided to key cities such as Delhi and Mumbai from incoming ballistic missiles.
Under the DRDO project, the plan is to take down long range ballistic missiles coming in from up to 2,000 km, at heights of 30 to 120 kilometres.
In the past few years, India has been taking significant steps to improve its air defence capabilities as a number of new mechanisms to take on hostile aerial action have been introduced and many more new systems will be added in the near future.
India recently started inducting the long-delayed `20,000 crore SPYDER missile systems into the Air Force and some of the systems have already been deployed on the western frontier to thwart any misadventure from the Pakistan side.
India has also signed a deal worth `17,000-crore for medium-range-surface-to-air-missile (MRSAM) system with Israel to equip the Army Air Defence Corps to take out enemy planes and drones at ranges of up to 70 kilometres in the air.
The DRDO has also started a programme to develop a quick-reaction surface-to-air missile system to enable the armed forces to bolster air defence capabilities in both the western and eastern sectors.
Indian agencies are considering the NASAMS at a time when defence ties between India and the US are on a high and New Delhi has contracted for military hardware worth over `75,000 crore in the last one decade.
The Indian Air Force has acquired various systems from the US including the C-17 Globemaster heavylift aircraft, C-130J Super Hercules Special Operations planes, Apache attack choppers and the Chinook heavy-lift helicopters in the last seven to eight years.
The Navy has also acquired 12 P-8 anti-submarine warfare and surveillance aircraft from the US for looking after its vast maritime zone and replace its Russian Tupolev spy planes.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!



21032436_707045202799310_8271005926055118399_n.jpg


20915142_707045236132640_6311105637686697468_n.jpg
 

sanblvd

Junior Member
Registered Member
Creates issues for integration but if they can manage to get it going it is still an achievement

I think its possible, this is just like China's Type 052 destroyer build in the 1990s, french radar and SAM, US propulsion, Italian sonar. But soon China is able to produce its own and stop using them.

As for whatever India is capable of following China's footsteps, we'll see.
 

kurutoga

Junior Member
Registered Member
I think its possible, this is just like China's Type 052 destroyer build in the 1990s, french radar and SAM, US propulsion, Italian sonar. But soon China is able to produce its own and stop using them.

As for whatever India is capable of following China's footsteps, we'll see.

People are saying, for example, Sejong The Great destroyer from Korea (KDIII)'s Korean made VLS system and Mk41 must run in different processing systems.
 

Hendrik_2000

Lieutenant General
I think its possible, this is just like China's Type 052 destroyer build in the 1990s, french radar and SAM, US propulsion, Italian sonar. But soon China is able to produce its own and stop using them.

As for whatever India is capable of following China's footsteps, we'll see.

Type 52 Luhu class DDG never worked properly because of the difficulty of integrating disparate component that is not meant to work overwhelmed the effort. It is nightmare Luhu class never enter service and only 2 were built

Only recently after midlife refit that they reached their intended function as DDG
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 

plawolf

Brigadier
With modern military weapon systems becoming all about sensor fuse, seamless data sharing and co-operative engagement etc, India's Frankenstein's monster style of cobbled together military assets will far further and further behind the curve.

It's hard and expensive enough to integrate all the different systems like that when you make them all domestically, and all the different firms were working closely together from the conceptual design stage with the ultimate goal of integrating all their different systems together seamlessly.

Even if India somehow managed to get all their foreign parts markers to share source codes (which would be pretty much near unprecedented) to allow them to attempt to properly integrate everything together, the sheer technical difficulty will likely be beyond them (or anyone for that matter).

Future wars will be won by the military that can get their assets to work best as a seamless system rather than a collection of individuals assets. But that is what the Indian military procurement decisions have cursed the Indian military to be stuck with for decades to come - a hodge podge pick and mix of assets and systems from all over the world with little to no apparent regard to how those assets are supposed to all work together.
 

Top