CV-17 Shandong (002 carrier) Thread I ...News, Views and operations

Intrepid

Senior Member
With this drawing of typical flight deck layout of a supercarrier anyone can imagine the position of the landing area foul lines and safe shot lines:
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On Liaoning there is no place to park aircraft left of the landing area while recovery is in progress. The
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is always inside of the landing area.
 

Bltizo

Moderator
Staff member
With this drawing of typical flight deck layout of a supercarrier anyone can imagine the position of the landing area foul lines and safe shot lines:
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On Liaoning there is no place to park aircraft left of the landing area while recovery is in progress. The
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is always inside of the landing area.
If the presence of the uncovered arrester cable on the sides really are a prohibiting factor which makes either aircraft parking or general flight deck maintenace of the aircraft near it impossible, then I expect subsequent carriers to adopt a variant of the arrestor cable where the sides are not exposed.

edit: in fact, installing a fitted, minimal thickness and minimally high metal cover over it could probably do the job of mitigating the dangers of the uncovered arrestor cable on the sides completely during arrest of an aircraft.
 
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Iron Man

Major
Registered Member
With this drawing of typical flight deck layout of a supercarrier anyone can imagine the position of the landing area foul lines and safe shot lines:
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!

On Liaoning there is no place to park aircraft left of the landing area while recovery is in progress. The
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is always inside of the landing area.
You can spot 2 aircraft at that location without the wheels touching any arresting cables. In fact those two spots are marked on the flight deck:
Liaoning.jpg
 

Intrepid

Senior Member
You can spot 2 aircraft at that location without the wheels touching any arresting cables. In fact those two spots are marked on the flight deck ...
Arresting cables swing in all directions. I do not believe that until I see a plane catching a wire while at this point another aircraft is parked. Foul Line is the dotted line. On the other side it is marked, but not on this side.
 

Intrepid

Senior Member
If the presence of the uncovered arrester cable on the sides really are a prohibiting factor which makes either aircraft parking or general flight deck maintenace of the aircraft near it impossible, then I expect subsequent carriers to adopt a variant of the arrestor cable where the sides are not exposed.

edit: in fact, installing a fitted, minimal thickness and minimally high metal cover over it could probably do the job of mitigating the dangers of the uncovered arrestor cable on the sides completely during arrest of an aircraft.
I don't remember any aircraft carrier on earth, where are aircraft parked over arresting cables while recovery is in progress. We can all search the internet for photos about this.
 

Bltizo

Moderator
Staff member
I don't remember any aircraft carrier on earth, where are aircraft parked over arresting cables while recovery is in progress. We can all search the internet for photos about this.
Well, I think there is a difference between arresting cables which are "free" i.e. the part of the cable meant to be caught, vs the part of the cable which is exposed between the sheave and the under-deck parts of the arresting cable apparatus (boxed in blue, below).

Obviously the free part of the cable is much more mobile and able to move and potentially flop about during the catch process, but the "blue" parts of the cable between the sheave and the under-deck apparatus has far less freedom for movement during the catch process.
Therefore, I think the biggest "danger" of the blue parts of the cable is the rapid tension and flat movement of the cable at that location which may present some danger to deck crew operating near that part... however the movement of the cable will mostly be flat rather than vertical. I think the biggest danger therefore is crew accidentally stepping on top of the wire, which would result in significant physical risk to them due to the sudden movement of the wire during the arrest process.
I think there is very minimal danger of the blue part of the cable to aircraft which are parked above it without having any part of the aircraft or personnel in physical contact with the blue part of the wire.

Of course, on USN carriers, the "blue" part of the cable is partly below deck and the more exposed parts of the cable are covered up by a small unobtrusive "roof" thus allowing crew to potentially step "atop" the blue part of the cable" and still remain safe during arrest operations. I imagine a small unobtrusive cover could be a viable solution for Liaoning and other carriers as well if they adopt the same arresting gear type.

 

Bltizo

Moderator
Staff member
On no carrier on earth the
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is part of the parking area. The foul line is allways outside of the sheave.
The "sheave" (round pulley) is different to the exposed cables between the sheaves and the under deck parts of the cable apparatus.

On the Liaoning, if the foul line was similar to say, USN carriers, then the foul line would be like so (orange lines):



similar to:





The problem, such as it is, for Liaoning, is that the exposed cables (indicated in blue in my last post) between the sheaves and the under deck apparatus extends the "foul line" more than it needs to be, and could be solved by a cover over the deck for that part of the cable... assuming it is a significant problem to begin with.
 

Iron Man

Major
Registered Member
On no carrier on earth the
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is part of the parking area. The foul line is allways outside of the sheave.
I have no idea why you keep sticking to this line since there is photographic evidence that proves you wrong. I'm sure the people who painted those spot markers know more about what they are doing than internet observers:
Liaoning spots.jpg
 
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