China demographics thread.


ansy1968

Major
Registered Member
Those Chinese who can afford to employ foreign helpers are usually affluent and are more likely to be generous.
@badoc bro most of those Chinese mainlanders who came here are ordinary people, with hard work they're able to flourish. Most affluent Chinese prefer the West and the US and why would they come here? Like my father before me, since he came from a poor family their is an affinity , he see himself in them as most of the domestic helpers came from the provinces.
If flood gates are opened, and ah mao ah gou can employ helpers so they can work to supplement expenses, it will be no different than the situation in Singapore and Hong Kong.
I'm not generalizing but those Filipino domestic helpers contribute a lot to the economy of Singapore and HK. Without them, the wife need to care for the children instead of working. What I'm imploring is that they gave due respect and dignity befitting a fellow human being.
 

t2contra

Major
Those Chinese who can afford to employ foreign helpers are usually affluent and are more likely to be generous.
If flood gates are opened, and ah mao ah gou can employ helpers so they can work to supplement expenses, it will be no different than the situation in Singapore and Hong Kong.

It is generally easier to work for those who dislike housework, so they may not be so demanding.
Woe betide those working for people who are meticulous in doing their housework and in their attention to their children and spouses and they had to work due to financial considerations, and had to leave their "baobei" to the helper's care.
.

Also, don't forget the mainland Chinese employers in the Philippines are employing locals, unlike those in Singapore.
 

badoc

Junior Member
Registered Member
Also, don't forget the mainland Chinese employers in the Philippines are employing locals, unlike those in Singapore.
Haha, they better treat their local helpers well if they want to return to China alive.
Many Filipinos have guns at home and willing to use it, I know this personally.

When these women go to work overseas, they dare to do things they wouldn't do in the PH.
They are more uninhibited in a foreign land and are more willing to do whatever necessary to earn more for their families back home and have less fear of being shamed.

I have used Pinay helpers for 20+ years and have good knowledge of the nasty things that some(I estimate 50%) of them do..
So I am neutral on why some paranoid Singapore employers take extreme measures to control their helpers.
Most of us don't care what others do, but it is different when that somebody is staying in your house
with access to your loved ones.

Not a good feeling when you found out your helper brought their Indian boyfriends home to have fun while you and your children are away at school and at work.
My brother's helper goes out secretly after midnight to meet her Indian boyfriend.
I kept quiet bearing in mind not to alarm my brother and mom.
.
 

ansy1968

Major
Registered Member
Haha, they better treat their local helpers well if they want to return to China alive.
Many Filipinos have guns at home and willing to use it, I know this personally.

When these women go to work overseas, they dare to do things they wouldn't do in the PH.
They are more uninhibited in a foreign land and are more willing to do whatever necessary to earn more for their families back home and have less fear of being shamed.

I have used Pinay helpers for 20+ years and have good knowledge of the nasty things that some(I estimate 50%) of them do..
So I am neutral on why some paranoid Singapore employers take extreme measures to control their helpers.
Most of us don't care what others do, but it is different when that somebody is staying in your house
with access to your loved ones.

Not a good feeling when you found out your helper brought their Indian boyfriends home to have fun while you and your children are away at school and at work.
My brother's helper goes out secretly after midnight to meet her Indian boyfriend.
I kept quiet bearing in mind not to alarm my brother and mom.
.
@badoc I share your concern, BUT you don't seem to understand what I'm saying, the Chinese mainlanders had employed the domestic helpers here in the Philippine, unlike those from Singapore and HK thru AGENCY. Therefore they had established a kind of relationship. Working abroad Filipinos are vulnerable, they don't know who their employers are, the living condition, so abuses and recrimination happen. And most of the girls are young and not suited to work abroad, such is the demand for Filipino Domestic help ( hard working, can speak and understand English) that such concern is being sweep under the rag.
 

Hendrik_2000

Lieutenant General
Haha, they better treat their local helpers well if they want to return to China alive.
Many Filipinos have guns at home and willing to use it, I know this personally.

When these women go to work overseas, they dare to do things they wouldn't do in the PH.
They are more uninhibited in a foreign land and are more willing to do whatever necessary to earn more for their families back home and have less fear of being shamed.

I have used Pinay helpers for 20+ years and have good knowledge of the nasty things that some(I estimate 50%) of them do..
So I am neutral on why some paranoid Singapore employers take extreme measures to control their helpers.
Most of us don't care what others do, but it is different when that somebody is staying in your house
with access to your loved ones.

Not a good feeling when you found out your helper brought their Indian boyfriends home to have fun while you and your children are away at school and at work.
My brother's helper goes out secretly after midnight to meet her Indian boyfriend.
I kept quiet bearing in mind not to alarm my brother and mom.
.
Yeah this is a problem after all they are human has a need for affection and companionship. Yes sometime they cross the boundary and do nasty thing like inviting stranger to the house. Or met stranger outside the house ghosh I hate to think about it what they do and bring back disease. But in Taiwan they have to be 24X7 available and only have 1 day off per month that is cruel. Anyway since most southern Chinese have already 25 Austronesian gene a couple more austronesian gene does not make a difference. who care about racial purity? Here is the result of Gnome project initiated by the NUS and TPAS(Peranakan society of Singapore) They found out that 10% of baba are pure Chinese with no traces of Malay DNA at all! but 90% do. They were surprise and didn't expect it at all. The result struck a chord with baba community Phone ring didn't stop and Inbox mail is floodedPeranakan DNA.jpg
Peranakan DNA_2.pngKebaya_5.png
 
Last edited:

Appix

Junior Member
Registered Member

Ignore the two last paragraphs and the overall tone (crackdown needs to be regulations) of the article but what do you expect from Japanese media. They seem to prefer hypercapitalism and "free market" to run rampant a la HK destroying the whole society along the way.​

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China pushes private schools to turn public in 'fairness' lesson​

cc6d534612150217b7fe6402520321f65a79a4fd.webp



Soaring education costs places many families in financial bind. China's crackdown on for-profit education gained steam this month as authorities push to make private elementary and middle schools public under a banner of promoting fairness in education.
The rise of the private sector in education has caused costs to soar, with parents spending tens of thousands of dollars a year to get the best education for their child. This has made many young couples think twice about starting a family.

The government looks to nationalize private schools and regulate fees for after-school tutoring and test-prep companies -- so-called cram schools -- to correct disparities and to promote births. But the trade-off could be the loss of quality education due to lack of state funding.

More than 16 million students attended private elementary and middle schools last year. The number includes close to 15% of all middle school students and 9% of all elementary students.

But early this month, the education officials for the inland province of Shaanxi told reporters that they will encourage operators of private schools providing compulsory education to transfer their assets to local governments and convert to public schools.

In Foshan, a city of 7.2 million in Guangdong Province, there is a plan to purchase private schools in some districts. The cities of Changsha and Zhoukou aim to reduce the ratio of elementary and middle-school students attending private schools to less than 5% by the end of next year.

Over 30% of Zhoukou's elementary to middle-school students are taught in private schools. To get that number below 5%, it is estimated that the government would need to purchase at least 60 private institutions, shut down at least 200 other schools, and direct more than 80,000 students to public learning.

This clampdown on private school traces back to directives sent in May by the Communist Party and the State Council. Barring exceptions, no new private school will be permitted to open, according to local media reports.

Some private schools serve migrant workers who cannot enroll their children into area public schools because the families are not entered into home registries. These private schools will continue to operate, but local governments will manage budgets.
There are private schools in China jointly operated by public schools and enterprises. For example, a real estate group might help fund a branch institution of a well-known public school.

The elite public school gets access to funds while the real estate company can use the brand to build and sell condominiums around the new private school. However, the central government has told local authorities to convert the majority of these schools into fully public schools by mid-2023.

The May notice cast a critical eye on excessive education fees. In Beijing, some private elementary and middle schools can cost over 200,000 yuan ($31,300) a year. The government is mandating that private elementary and middle schools be nonprofit, just like cram schools.

Private institutions that will not become public will be notified by the government of standard tuitions. The schools will not be allowed to collect donations, nor can they select students through tests or interviews. Gaining admission in an outside school district will be strictly regulated as well.

Public reaction to the measures have been mixed. While some applaud the efforts to level the educational playing field, others are cynical.

"The government does whatever it pleases," said one online commentator.
This campaign against private schools has been juxtaposed with the "common prosperity" initiative launched by President Xi Jinping's administration this summer.

One potential pitfall is that local governments would face ballooning expenses for education. The lack of public resources in outlying areas is one big reason the private sector stepped forward to run schools. If government spending does not keep up with the rising share of public schools, it could lead to a deterioration of facilities and staff.

Elementary and middle schools have been required to teach "Xi Jinping Thought," the president's political ideology, since the September school term. The conversion of private schools into public schools suggests that the government seeks friendlier venues to consolidate loyalty and control.

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Last edited:

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member

Ignore the two last paragraphs.​

-------------------------------​

China pushes private schools to turn public in 'fairness' lesson​

cc6d534612150217b7fe6402520321f65a79a4fd.webp



Soaring education costs places many families in financial bind.
China's crackdown on for-profit education gained steam this month as authorities push to make private elementary and middle schools public under a banner of promoting fairness in education.
The rise of the private sector in education has caused costs to soar, with parents spending tens of thousands of dollars a year to get the best education for their child. This has made many young couples think twice about starting a family.
The government looks to nationalize private schools and regulate fees for after-school tutoring and test-prep companies -- so-called cram schools -- to correct disparities and to promote births. But the trade-off could be the loss of quality education due to lack of state funding.

More than 16 million students attended private elementary and middle schools last year. The number includes close to 15% of all middle school students and 9% of all elementary students.

But early this month, the education officials for the inland province of Shaanxi told reporters that they will encourage operators of private schools providing compulsory education to transfer their assets to local governments and convert to public schools.

In Foshan, a city of 7.2 million in Guangdong Province, there is a plan to purchase private schools in some districts. The cities of Changsha and Zhoukou aim to reduce the ratio of elementary and middle-school students attending private schools to less than 5% by the end of next year.

Over 30% of Zhoukou's elementary to middle-school students are taught in private schools. To get that number below 5%, it is estimated that the government would need to purchase at least 60 private institutions, shut down at least 200 other schools, and direct more than 80,000 students to public learning.
This clampdown on private school traces back to directives sent in May by the Communist Party and the State Council. Barring exceptions, no new private school will be permitted to open, according to local media reports.

Some private schools serve migrant workers who cannot enroll their children into area public schools because the families are not entered into home registries. These private schools will continue to operate, but local governments will manage budgets.
There are private schools in China jointly operated by public schools and enterprises. For example, a real estate group might help fund a branch institution of a well-known public school.

The elite public school gets access to funds while the real estate company can use the brand to build and sell condominiums around the new private school. However, the central government has told local authorities to convert the majority of these schools into fully public schools by mid-2023.

The May notice cast a critical eye on excessive education fees. In Beijing, some private elementary and middle schools can cost over 200,000 yuan ($31,300) a year. The government is mandating that private elementary and middle schools be nonprofit, just like cram schools.

Private institutions that will not become public will be notified by the government of standard tuitions. The schools will not be allowed to collect donations, nor can they select students through tests or interviews. Gaining admission in an outside school district will be strictly regulated as well.

Public reaction to the measures have been mixed. While some applaud the efforts to level the educational playing field, others are cynical.

"The government does whatever it pleases," said one online commentator.
This campaign against private schools has been juxtaposed with the "common prosperity" initiative launched by President Xi Jinping's administration this summer.

One potential pitfall is that local governments would face ballooning expenses for education. The lack of public resources in outlying areas is one big reason the private sector stepped forward to run schools. If government spending does not keep up with the rising share of public schools, it could lead to a deterioration of facilities and staff.

Elementary and middle schools have been required to teach "Xi Jinping Thought," the president's political ideology, since the September school term. The conversion of private schools into public schools suggests that the government seeks friendlier venues to consolidate loyalty and control.

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I'm not sure about the long term impact of this. I don't think it is going to bear positive fruits in terms of retaining wealthy / high income class and their positive evaluation towards life in China.


I agree with those who disagree. The government should plough in more money to improve Public schools. I'm sure they can do it.
 

Overbom

Captain
Registered Member
I'm not sure about the long term impact of this. I don't think it is going to bear positive fruits in terms of retaining wealthy / high income class and their positive evaluation towards life in China.


I agree with those who disagree. The government should plough in more money to improve Public schools. I'm sure they can do it.
I personally don't have too much of a negative opinion against private schools

Except that they should not be allowed to become a wealthy plaything where the rich people's children are cut off from the real world of the middle-poor class people

This means that I support private schools as long as there is a sufficient quota for non-rich children. And lastly, the costs of attending private schools should be strictly controlled to not be excessive

As long as these things are addressed, then I am ok with private schools
 

Overbom

Captain
Registered Member
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This is a good development imo, the west generally use their universities to influence foreign students on their campus to adopt a more pro western behaviour and ideology
Believe it or not, most of the Chinese who go to the West for education, return back to China a lot more pro-China than before

You have to live there for a couple of years to understand what racism/yellow-peril actually is
 

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