Yuan Class AIP & Kilo Submarine Thread


Tirdent

Junior Member
Registered Member
It does look too big to be a Yuan, so is likely nuclear - but don't all 093 versions known to date have a vertical sail trailing edge? Also the shape of the rudder is different, with a greater leading edge sweep.

To be honest, I'm inclined to dismiss it as fake though.
 

Tam

Major
Registered Member
It does look too big to be a Yuan, so is likely nuclear - but don't all 093 versions known to date have a vertical sail trailing edge? Also the shape of the rudder is different, with a greater leading edge sweep.

To be honest, I'm inclined to dismiss it as fake though.
Yes like a slight hump trailing on the back of the sail. The trailing hump seems to differ a bit among the variants, but I am confident to say this is an 093 variant. It also has a pitot on the tail fin for a TAS, which is another characteristic of the later 093 variants whatever its called (093II, 093G, 093B, whatever.)
 

lcloo

Junior Member
You will have to wait until they come up with details.

Translation from Russian:-
Russia and China can together create a next-generation non-nuclear submarine. This was announced by the official representative of the Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation (FSVTS) during the international military-technical forum "Army-2020."

According to the representative of FSVTS, Russia and China are currently engaged in joint design of a next-generation non-submarine submarine. At the same time, he did not explain what kind of submarine the parties want to receive, at what stage are the works and other details of the joint project.

"We are currently working with the Chinese side on the joint design of a next-generation non-nuclear submarine. It is too early to talk about the completion of the works."
 

Tam

Major
Registered Member
The question is why would russia want to co-develop a submarine with china for this purpose, if they already have submarines of their own for export? that will also mean the sharing of military tech.
Russia's own AIP efforts on the Lada class submarine flubbed, mainly because of the wrong direction, using fuel cells ala Germany, rather than Stirling engines, ala China and Sweden. The Russians would have to start from square one to restart in a new direction. Getting Stirling engines from China would be much easier. Another advantage the Chinese have would be Lithium battery technologies.
 

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