US Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Actually Jeff there was a recent report that might change that.
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!

If accurate then the navy is thinking of replacing block VII with a new SSN (X) which would be more like the Sea Wolf class. The remaining cruise missile capacity to be spread across a Columbia class SSGN derivative.
I heard of that...but just do not believe they will use a Columbia that way...it puts too many SLCM in one place where more Virginias gives you very strong SSN capabilities on that front as well as spreading out the SLCMs so they are not so many in one place to lose when you lose one vessel.

I still believe continuing the Virginias which have been an example of how to manage a Naval project...ahead of schedule and below cost...lets keep that going.

A new SSN (X) would be nice with an updated Sea Wolf, but it would end up either not being that much better than the Virginia later blocks and more expensive...or, if they push the envelope, will end up taking a lot longer.

Sooner or later we will have to do the next SSN...but I believe the Virginia with block iterations can keep us well ahead of adversaries for some time to come.

They should begin doing an SSN(X) design study starting in the 2030s to 2040s.
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
I heard of that...but just do not believe they will use a Columbia that way...it puts too many SLCM in one place where more Virginias gives you very strong SSN capabilities on that front as well as spreading out the SLCMs so they are not so many in one place to lose when you lose one vessel.
We already do that with the Ohio SSGN. A Columbia based would have a smaller number of missiles then those big former boomers.
Columbia class in the SSBN aims for 16 missile tubes, Ohio has 24. In the SSGN configuration the Ohio boats use 22 of those to hold 7 SLCMs for 158 missiles. Presumably a Columbia class SSGN derivative would simmiliarly use 2 tubes for other functions meaning 14 cruise missile launch cells for 98 missiles.
 

Jura

General
I heard of that...but just do not believe they will use a Columbia that way...it puts too many SLCM in one place where more Virginias gives you very strong SSN capabilities on that front as well as spreading out the SLCMs so they are not so many in one place to lose when you lose one vessel.

I still believe continuing the Virginias which have been an example of how to manage a Naval project...ahead of schedule and below cost...lets keep that going.

A new SSN (X) would be nice with an updated Sea Wolf, but it would end up either not being that much better than the Virginia later blocks and more expensive...or, if they push the envelope, will end up taking a lot longer.

Sooner or later we will have to do the next SSN...but I believe the Virginia with block iterations can keep us well ahead of adversaries for some time to come.

They should begin doing an SSN(X) design study starting in the 2030s to 2040s.
quoting from p. 18 of
An Analysis of
the Navy’s
Fiscal Year 2019
Shipbuilding Plan
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!

:
"Under the 2019 shipbuilding plan, submarines would
consume the lion’s share of shipbuilding funds over
the next 30 years—almost half of the amount needed
for new-ship construction (see
Table 6). The Navy
currently operates 14 Ohio class ballistic missile
submarines, 4 Ohio class guided missile submarines
(SSGNs) modified from the SSBN version, and
50 attack submarines of several classes. Over the next
three decades, the Navy plans to buy 12 new SSBNs,
with the first purchase occurring in 2021. In a major
departure from the last five shipbuilding plans, the Navy
also wants to purchase 5 “large payload submarines”
that are intended to replace the capability provided
by the SSGNs that will be retired in the mid- to late
2020s. It also plans to buy 60 new attack submarines,
including 30 Virginia class submarines that will carry
more weapons than existing Virginias and 30 attack
submarines of a new, advanced design. Production of
those ships is set to begin in 2034."

and here's the chart (p. 12; 16 of 33 in PDF):


from what I figured, the Pentagon underestimated the cost of making this plan a reality
Oct 20, 2018
"Using this size, the CBO estimates building the new Seawolf-class type of submarine will cost about $5.5 billion per sub. In contrast, the Navy’s shipbuilding plan estimates SSN(X) production will run about $3.1 billion per sub."

inside
Navy’s New SSN(X) Attack Sub To Be Faster, More Lethal – And More Expensive
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!


!
plus, in a related development Friday at 8:57 PM
wow
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!

Trump campaigned on more money for the Pentagon, but his budget director appears to have won the fight for sweeping, across the board cuts to all federal agencies, including the Pentagon.
link:
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 

timepass

Brigadier
Boeing Is Developing A New High-Speed Apache Gunship With A Pusher Prop On Its Tail



The revised design could be a contender Army's new scout helicopter requirements and help the service keep its Apaches combat capable past 2050.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 

timepass

Brigadier
Moveover, 355-ship Navy: New report calls for an even larger fleet



PARIS – The U.S. is woefully short of ships and even the Navy’s target
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
is well short of what the country needs to prepare for two simultaneous major conflicts and maintain its
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
with excess capacity for surge operations and combat casualties.

That is the major finding of
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
from the conservative think tank The Heritage Foundation, an organization prominent in the Trump era because of its
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
.


Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 

timepass

Brigadier
Pentagon's No. 2 confirms plans for defense budget cuts



The Trump administration is planning cuts to next year’s defense budget, the Pentagon’s No. 2 civilian confirmed Friday.

Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan told reporters that the administration has requested the Pentagon plan for a national defense budget of $700 billion for fiscal 2020, down from $716 billion this fiscal year.

“Imagine we’ve been going through this very disciplined process for the whole year to build a budget that’s $733 billion, and then last week, we were directed, build us a $700 billion budget,” Shanahan said at the Military Reporters and Editors Associations conference.

The national defense budget encompasses both Pentagon and non-Pentagon defense items such as the Department of Energy’s nuclear weapons programs.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
first floated a budget cut last week,
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
every Cabinet head for a 5 percent cut next fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1, 2019.

At the time it was unclear what that would mean for defense. Asked about the Pentagon, Trump said last week that the budget “will probably be $700 billion.” That would be an increase from $686.1 billion if he was referring solely to the Pentagon budget, or a 2.2 percent decrease if he was referring to the entire national defense budget.

Because the Pentagon was already finalizing a budget in line with a $733 billion national defense budget when the administration asked for the cut, the department’s comptroller will present parallel budget documents, Shanahan said.

The two proposals will allow Defense Secretary
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
to see the “trade offs,” Shanahan said.

The defense budget has enjoyed two years of significant hikes under the Trump administration in order to address what officials have called an urgent readiness crisis.

While defense hawks on Capitol Hill have acknowledged continued budget hikes could be a heavy political lift depending on the results of the Nov. 6 midterm elections, they have said the budget needs to remain steady to maintain progress on addressing readiness issues.

Congress ultimately decides funding levels.

Mattis, meanwhile, has talked about the need for 3 percent to 5 percent budget growth each year in order to successfully repair readiness.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 

timepass

Brigadier
Air Force secretary details plans to increase fighter readiness

GRAPEVINE, Texas —The Air Force has submitted a plan to improve the mission-capable rates of F-22, F-35 and F-16 squadrons, which currently is
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
.

The plan’s submission was confirmed by Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson, who laid out some details in an exclusive interview at the Airlift Tanker Association’s annual symposium outside Dallas.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 

Top