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Brigadier
Colt Awarded Foreign Military Sales Contract for 10,000 M4s



Colt have been awarded to a contract worth nearly $60 million to produce M4 carbines for America’s allies. Back in July we reported that Colt, along with FN, Remington and Daniel Defense, had been selected to produce M4 carbines for Foreign Military Sales. Remington is believed to have been the first to have been awarded a Foreign Military Sales contract for production as a result of the Department of Defense’s downselection.

The latest Foreign Military Sales contract is worth just over $57 million to produce a batch of 10,000 carbines for export, which is almost double the earlier announced contract. This suggests that there is more to the contract than just 10,000 carbines. The purchasing country does not interact directly with the manufacturer, rather, the Department of Defense’s Defense Security Cooperation Agency acts as an intermediary. The agency places orders, organises the logistics of delivery to the purchaser. Purchasing countries must have proven credit or have deposited payment with the US Government.
Colt have been awarded a firm fixed price contract to produce M4s destined for Jordan, Morocco, Afghanistan, Senegal, Tunisia and Pakistan. These are participating countries which have been approved and authorised by the Department of Defense.

Here is the Department of Defense’s contact award announcement, posted on the 20th September, in full:

Colt’s Manufacturing Co. LLC, West Hartford, Connecticut, was awarded a $57,722,819 firm-fixed-price Foreign Military Sales (Jordan, Morocco, Afghanistan, Senegal, Tunisia and Pakistan) contract for procurement of up to 10,000 additional M4 and M4A1 5.56mm carbine rifles. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work will be performed in West Hartford, Connecticut, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 20, 2019. Fiscal 2018 foreign military sales funds in the amount of $57,722,819 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-18-F-0115).

The contract will be a much needed boost for Colt in the face of continuing legal and financial issues. The exact distribution of the 10,000 carbines between the countries listed in the announcement is unknown. Production and delivery is set to be completed in 12 months, by the 20th September 2019.

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Brigadier
100th P-8 Poseidon manufactured at Boeing facility.....


The Boeing P-8 Poseidon (Multimission Maritime Aircraft) is developed for the USN, The aircraft is a modified version of 737-800ERX. Currently P-8 is serving US Navy (89 in service 33 on order) Indian Navy (6 in service ,4 more on order)and The Royal Australian Air Force (2 in service, 10 on order)

>> Role:
Anti-submarine warfare (ASW)
Anti-surface warfare (ASUW)
Shipping interdiction
Early warning self-protection (EWSP)/Electronic support measures (ESM).

>> Weapons:
Torpedoes
Harpoon AshM
Mines
 

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Brigadier
The U.S. Navy Reveals Two Future Submarine Classes
New attack boats could cost $200 billion




Today the Navy possesses 65 submarines. All of them are nuclear-powered. They include 14 Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarines, or “boomers,” which the Navy expects to begin replacing with 12 new Columbia-class boomers starting in 2021.

The balance of today’s submarines include 35 1980s-vintage Los Angeles-class attack submarines, three attack boats of the 1990s Seawolf class, 13 newer Virginia-class attack boats and four old Ohios that the Navy converted into cruise-missile carriers during the early 2000s. Each of these old boats can carry as many as 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles.

Today around 10 attack subs are on patrol on any given day while the others undergo maintenance and crew training. Navy plans require as many as 35 boats to surge on short notice to a war zone during a major conflict.
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today's article

The Fiscal Calm before the Storm
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appears to be written before Yesterday at 8:57 PM
wow
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Trump campaigned on more money for the Pentagon, but his budget director appears to have won the fight for sweeping, across the board cuts to all federal agencies, including the Pentagon.
link:
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the text anyway:
Next year’s budget will face three pressures that make it unlikely to be characterized as sustained or predictable.

The Department of Defense recently released a
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aimed at showing the taxpayer where the extra dollars appropriated in 2018 for defense went. In its conclusion, it carries an important warning: “DOD is making significant progress, but without sustained and predictable funding, our gains will fade and investments will not realize their full potential.”

Even though the Pentagon started this fiscal year — 2019 —with authorization and appropriation bills in place, this was the
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. The military has had to rely on
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to start the fiscal year 13 times in the last 18 years, including every year between 2010 and 2018. Next year’s budget will face three different pressures that make it unlikely to be characterized as sustained or predictable. Sustainability is related to having enough funds to execute DOD’s mandate, whereas predictable is related to having appropriations in place before the start of a new fiscal year.

The first is the Budget Control Act, which limits federal spending for the next two annual budgets. Every two years, lawmakers have negotiated deals to raise its caps: the
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allowed the 2018 defense budget to exceed the cap by $80 billion and reach $629 billion; and for the 2019 budget, the cap was lifted $85 billion, allowing an allocation of $647 billion. For 2020, merely keeping funding flat will mean raising the BCA limit by $71 billion. No matter which party is leading Congress, it will be a tall order. This has the potential to affect the predictability of the resources, since the BCA caps were established Congress has delayed the budget and had to rely on continuing resolutions for the DOD every year since its passage with the exception of 2019.

A second pressure is self-created. Over time, some expenditures that should be in base budgets have crept into the Overseas Contingency Operations account, the BCA-exempt fund created to cover unexpected costs of overseas wars and other operations. It is what the
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the forth phase on OCO usage since 2001 – “using OCO funding to avoid budget caps.” For example: the
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, designed to check Russian influence. Since it has become a long-term program and thus an enduring expense, it belongs in the base budget. In the 2019 budget request, Pentagon officials said they would begin to correct the situation by asking to transfer some $49 billion in 2020 spending from OCO to the base budget. This is the right thing to do — but doing it this year means that the BCA cap must be raised by $120 billion ($71 billion plus $49 billion) just to keep spending flat.

A third pressure, also self-inflicted, comes from unrealized savings combined with a
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flat budget growth. In May, DoD leaders said various efficiencies and reforms would help make up the difference, providing some $46 billion over five years. But by August, just
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had been found. The
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was to put those savings toward in war-fighting capabilities that need to be funded. These savings would be even more important because the Department is not planning on asking for a budgetary increase. In summer 2017, Pentagon leaders said rebuilding the sadly depleted military would require annual budgets to rise 3 to 5 percent beyond inflation until 2023. But current budget projections for 2020 and beyond expect growth
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. Considering that inflation is likely to erode some of DOD’s purchasing power, this pressure will threaten the sustainability of the budget.

These three pressures will have to be tackled by a new Congress. For good or ill, the dispute over the last two years of the BCA caps will likely define what the incoming Congress will be able to achieve during its next two years.

Dispute over setting new BCA caps and disagreements on federal priorities have forced the DOD to operate under a continuing resolution for an
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of 138 days between 2011 and 2018. It is hard to imagine how 2020 would be an exemption to the norm. Todd Harrison at the Center for Strategic and International Studies is
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“a nice, long CR” to start the fiscal year 2020. The cap raises in 2018 were fueled by increased debt expenditures, which is unlikely to be repeated,especially considering that President Trump has started to
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. His emphasis on the debt has come as request for every agency to reduce its budget by 5 percent, which is going to affect the
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. Regardless of what the President requests from Congress, it will been challenging to reach it.

All this dispute is a byproduct of our
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. The federal government has recently generated a record-breaking deficit and the overall outlook is that the country will maintain that trajectory, which will undoubtedly making it harder to reach a budget deal without simply further increasing the debt – the undesirable route that fueled the agreement for 2018 and 2019.

Meanwhile, in defense the stakes are high as America must deal with a revanchist Russia, an expansionist and aggressive China, a belligerent Iran and a nuclear-armed North Korea. All threats that will require resources that are currently unavailable in the budget. Even without accounting for these threats, 2020 is shaping up to be a challenging time for the Department of Defense.
oops didn't know
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Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
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DSC01698.jpg
Boeing's Defense, Space and Security Division has rolled-out the 100th Boeing P-8 Poseidon for the United States Navy. The aircraft entered final assembly at Boeing's 737 Production Line in Renton, WA, this past April. The aircraft still must complete proper flight testing and be fitted with top secret equipment before being delivered as the 86th Boeing P-8 Poseidon for the United States Navy.

Approximately 100 Boeing employees gathered outside of Boeing's Renton facilities for a photo-op with the aircraft to celebrate the important milestone.
 

Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
The U.S. Navy Reveals Two Future Submarine Classes
New attack boats could cost $200 billion




Today the Navy possesses 65 submarines. All of them are nuclear-powered. They include 14 Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarines, or “boomers,” which the Navy expects to begin replacing with 12 new Columbia-class boomers starting in 2021.

The balance of today’s submarines include 35 1980s-vintage Los Angeles-class attack submarines, three attack boats of the 1990s Seawolf class, 13 newer Virginia-class attack boats and four old Ohios that the Navy converted into cruise-missile carriers during the early 2000s. Each of these old boats can carry as many as 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles.

Today around 10 attack subs are on patrol on any given day while the others undergo maintenance and crew training. Navy plans require as many as 35 boats to surge on short notice to a war zone during a major conflict.
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There are currently 16 Virginia class submarines active, SSN-790, USS South Dakota being the latest.. 17 have been built. Eight more are on order (meaning they are completely funded). Current plans, with the Block V SSGN version coming online after 11 more Block III (2) BLock IV (8) and V boats are built...meaning there will be 30 Virginia's without the additional Vertical launch missile silos. After the Block IVs, the plans call for building up to 20 Block V, VI, and VII ships, totaling 50 Virginia altogether, although current estimates could call for as many as 65 Virginias.

With the Block V and later, which will have the Virginia Payload Model (VPM). This is a new 80-100 foot section placed in the middle of the boat behind the sail which holds four large diameter tubes which can accommodate 7 Tomahawk cruise missiles each. These vessels would then carry a total of 40 cruise misiles and would then replace the four Ohio class SSGNs, each of which can carry 155 tomohawk missiles. In order to replace the 600 missiles carried by the current four SSGNs, at least 15 Virginia SSGNs would need to be built. The Navy plans to build at least 20 of them, and may build as many as 35.
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
VII ships, totaling 50 Virginia altogether, although current estimates could call for as many as 65 Virginias.
Actually Jeff there was a recent report that might change that.
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If accurate then the navy is thinking of replacing block VII with a new SSN (X) which would be more like the Sea Wolf class. The remaining cruise missile capacity to be spread across a Columbia class SSGN derivative.
 

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