UK Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
I believe the key phrase here is “Shot themselves in the foot”!





No replacement was found for the Mirage aircraft and now the refurbishment program that would have taken the A-4AR to 2028 has also been canceled. Just the other day the re-engine program for the IA-58 Pucara was canceled after 12 units. And the 40 IA-63 Pampa airframes are built but no engines or avionics have been ordered.:(

I will buy some balsa wood gliders to donate to the FAA this month.
Really, really sad my friend.

I mourn for your country.

Perhaps some day you will get an administration elected by the people, who will turn things around. I pray it is so.
 

Obi Wan Russell

Jedi Master
VIP Professional
Oh yes...I LIKE it...no...I LOVE IT!

And the beat goes one!
Well just think about it, a small firm in Cornwall can build you a lifesize realistic replica of an F-35B at a fraction of the price of the real thing... you could put one in your garden and be the envy of your neighbours! Another positive note I saw in the report was that as these GTAs have no engines, the Sea Harriers currently in use will be retained to provide a realistic training environment (Damned noisy things for their size!) so the SHAR lives on for many years to come!
 

Obi Wan Russell

Jedi Master
VIP Professional
Really, really sad my friend.

I mourn for your country.

Perhaps some day you will get an administration elected by the people, who will turn things around. I pray it is so.
In spite of everything that happened in the past, it saddens me and most British people to see a once proud ally fall so far. A decade ago we offered to split the potential South Atlantic Oil Revenues 50-50 with Argentina, a move which could have provided a major boost to their economy, but they wanted 100% or nothing. We extended the olive branch and they spurned it. There is still clearly a lot of animosity over the Falklands, but it is very much one sided.

A lot of good used second hand warships from the UK and other European Nations could have found their way into the Argentina Navy in recent years, but instead went to the breakers. 4xT22B3 for example, and they could have had a few T42s to supplement and help overhaul their own. They could have picked up a few ex-USN Spru-cans and Perrys for a song had they made efforts to improve relations with us, but instead they chose national pride on an issue they have no hope of winning, and now they have an Air Force with no planes, a Navy with no ammo for it's guns and no prospect of anything changing for the foreseeable future. I and my countrymen take no pleasure seeing an old friend fall on hard times.
 

Miragedriver

Brigadier
In spite of everything that happened in the past, it saddens me and most British people to see a once proud ally fall so far. A decade ago we offered to split the potential South Atlantic Oil Revenues 50-50 with Argentina, a move which could have provided a major boost to their economy, but they wanted 100% or nothing. We extended the olive branch and they spurned it. There is still clearly a lot of animosity over the Falklands, but it is very much one sided.

A lot of good used second hand warships from the UK and other European Nations could have found their way into the Argentina Navy in recent years, but instead went to the breakers. 4xT22B3 for example, and they could have had a few T42s to supplement and help overhaul their own. They could have picked up a few ex-USN Spru-cans and Perrys for a song had they made efforts to improve relations with us, but instead they chose national pride on an issue they have no hope of winning, and now they have an Air Force with no planes, a Navy with no ammo for it's guns and no prospect of anything changing for the foreseeable future. I and my countrymen take no pleasure seeing an old friend fall on hard times.

--OFF TOPIC--

Thank you so much my friend, and I whole heartedly agree with what you and Jeff said! If President Macri was in power back then things may have been different, but with the Kirchners that was impossible. This country is a lost cause now and there in no turning back the clock.

The problem is that Argentina has moved away from market oriented policies with imports substitution protectionist measures; national control over natural resources; a more predominant role for state companies and banks and discouraging foreign investments and the influx of capital. All of these policies have a negative impact for investors and consumers’ confidence, which on the long run has its influence on growth.

I wish that England and Argentina could be friends again one day, but sadly I don’t see that happening…Unless I was President! However, I would probably be dead within a week.

PS: I am working on an escape plan……….


--ON TOPIC--
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
Royal Navy Lynx HMA8 fleet bows out of service

  • 17 MARCH, 2017
  • SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM


A final flypast of four Royal Navy Westland Lynx HMA8 helicopters from 815 Naval Air Squadron, based at RNAS Yeovilton in Somerset, will take place on 17 March, before the type is officially decommissioned on 23 March.



Mark Kwiatkowski/FlightGlobal

The Lynx entered Fleet Air Arm service on 1 September 1976, and was flown in conflicts including the Falklands and Gulf wars. The HMA8 version has been replaced by AgustaWestland AW159 Wildcats.

Flight Fleets Analyzer records 111 legacy Lynx aircraft as being in operational use with 11 other nations following the RN retirement, with this total also including nine Lynx AH9As which will end their service lives with the British Army in March 2018.

AgustaWestland's new-generation Lynx Wildcat is in RN and Army Air Corps service for the UK, is also operated by the South Korean navy and is on order for the Philippines.
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The Lynx has been a widely popular utility and Maritime machine it set speed records only broken by non conventional rotorcraft , it was the first Helicopter to performed full loops and rolls never accomplished before by a helicopter.
 

FORBIN

Lieutenant General
Registered Member
The MoD have outlined basing plans for the British Naval base in Bahrain.

The base, HMS Juffair, at Mina Salman Port will play a central role in the Royal Navy’s ability to operate in the region, and reaffirms the UK’s determination to work with Bahrain to maintain security and stability in the Gulf. The facility will give the UK an enhanced and permanent presence in the region, allowing longer-term deployments in the Gulf.

The arrangement will improve onshore facilities at Mina Salman Port in Bahrain, the UK is planning to bolster the existing facilities at the Port in order to provide the Royal Navy with a forward operating base and a place to plan, store equipment for naval operations and accommodate Royal Navy personnel.

The following information comes
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Freedom of Information request response.

“How many ships will be based at Mina Salman following the construction of the new facility, what type of ships will they be and what type of operations will they be expected to conduct?”

The answer was:

“Today there are around half a dozen Royal Navy ships and units deployed in the region and well over 1,200 men and women.

This includes the Mine Counter Measures Force that have been located at the Bahrain facilities since 2003. This force of four Mine Counter Measures vessels, supported by one Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship will continue to be permanently located and supported from the new UK Mina Salman Support Facility (UK MSSF).

The UK MSSF will support all Royal Navy ships that deploy to the region that pass through Bahrain, but it is too early to say what the future scale of the Royal Navy’s deployment to the region will be and whether any further Royal Navy vessels will be permanently located at UK MSSF.”

Speaking at the ground breaking ceremony, then Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said:

“The beginning of construction work at Mina Salman Port marks a watershed moment in the UK’s commitment to the region. The presence of the Royal Navy in Bahrain is guaranteed into the future, ensuring Britain’s sustained presence east of Suez. The new facility will enable Britain to work with our allies to reinforce stability in the Gulf and beyond.”

Commander Joint Forces Command, General Sir Richard Barrons KCB CBE ADC, said:

“This is a reflection of the continued cooperation and engagement between the Bahrain Defence Forces and the UK Armed Forces. We welcome the continued support from Bahrain which enables the Royal Navy to operate in the Gulf region.”

The base is expected to be able to host the Queen Elizabeth class and Type 45 destroyers as well as frigates and mine-hunters.

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this is interesting (for me :)
MoD set for clash with defence sector over plan to cut profit level
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"Michael Fallon, defence secretary, is reducing the starting point for allowable profit on this type of contract from 8.95 per cent last year to 7.46 per cent for 2017 — a 30 per cent reduction since 2015."
 
now I read Labour blast government over aircraft carrier sea trial delay ‘farce’
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A delay to the start of sea trials of aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth have been branded a “farce” by a Labour Lord.

Lord Touhig said in a House of Lords session regarding the aircraft carrier:

“My Lords, we were told in the review of the SDSR that the carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth would begin sea trials in the spring.

Alas, in the words of Ella Fitzgerald, “spring will be a little late this year”, because Ministers now say that that will happen in the summer. But lo and behold, just two weeks ago, when my noble friend Lord West of Spithead asked whether summer was,

“defined as … from the summer solstice to the September equinox, or … June to August”,

he was told by the Minister that summer “was not defined” and that rather, it was a,

“broad indication of the likely timetable”.

This milestone in Britain’s maritime history is turning into a farce. I invite the Minister to come clean, tell us what has caused the delay and give us a firm date for the sea trials.”

Minister of State for the Ministry of Defence, Earl Howe, said:

“My Lords, perhaps I can clarify the timetable a little bit. “The summer” means “a little later than shortly”. To address the substance of his question, this is about the need to test systems.

The Queen Elizabeth class carriers are the largest and most complex warships ever built in this country. It is essential that we thoroughly test the ship’s many complex systems before she begins sea trials. None of the issues now being tested will affect acceptance of contract of HMS “Queen Elizabeth” later this year. The work is within the tolerance that we had anticipated in the contract schedule.”

Defence Procurement Minister Harriett Baldwin faced the Commons Defence Committee earlier in the year, she was asked Madeleine Moon what was behind the delay and responded by saying:

“The carrier is due in Portsmouth this year but what I can’t give the committee is the specific days of the week.

By the very definition of what you’re going through when you’re going through trials is that you’re potentially in that trial process have to make some corrections to something, that’s the whole point of a trial.”

The minister added that the crew of the aircraft carrier was ready.

Lt Gen. Mark Poffley, Deputy Chief of the Defence Staff for Military Capability, said:

“There have been a series of technical issues associated with bringing the vessel to the point where she can commence her sea trials.”

It is understood that this minor delay is ‘not outside the tolerance’ of the programme.

According to Bob Hawkins MBE, First Lieutenant of the aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth the plan was for the carrier to sail in March, he was quoted (in mid 2016):

“The build process continues up here in Rosyth. Some of you may have experienced this from the RN side of the house, perhaps in a new class of ship, in a new build. The frustrations are many and varied. Add to this the sheer scale and complexity of the Queen Elizabeth Class (QEC) aircraft carriers and you can imagine that each day brings a new challenge in moving towards Ships Staff Move On Board (SSMOB) then its sequel, Ready For Sea Date (RFSD).

SSMOB is planned for 9 January; RFSD 10 March. Using Andrew St George’s 12 principles of Leadership in the Royal Navy, I subscribe to his No.2, Cheerfulness. A glass half empty as opposed to a glass half full approach is a choice, and I choose to remain optimistic. Draw from that what you will.

Timing of First Entry Portsmouth (FEP) is dependent upon achieving RFSD and the subsequent success of Power and Propulsion Trials. This initial Contractor Sea Trials period we call euphemistically ‘5-1-5’, i.e. from RFSD, five weeks at sea, one week alongside (Invergordon), five weeks at sea, then FEP: a standard package that must be executed in full from whichever start date we achieve.

Clearly, FEP will shift right if RFSD does, or indeed if ‘5-1-5’ needs to be extended to accommodate any set-backs thrown up during the trials.”

Ian Booth, managing director of the Aircraft Carrier Alliance said:

“Pretty much everything is now installed in the ship and working. We’ve had lots of prior factory testing before putting systems on board and so far, it’s all looking pretty good.

Over the next few months we will finish compartment handovers, and complete work to coat the flight deck. We will also conduct harbour events and acceptance trials for virtually all systems – propulsion, steering, navigation, or communications – here [at Rosyth] before we go.”

It is my personal opinion that while there has been a slip in the timing of the vessel leaving Rosyth for trials, this really isn’t something to worry about as the vessel remains on track to enter service with the Royal Navy on time.

In such complex engineering projects, this type of occurrence isn’t a cause for concern nor is it unusual. HMS Queen Elizabeth, after all, is essentially a prototype and the Ministry of Defence can’t afford to get it wrong.
 

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