The Q-5, J-7, J-8 and older PLAAF aircraft


Deino

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I am trying to figure out why the first batches of PLAAF JJ-7 have a c/n with a 'A' (like A0718) and later batches have a c/n with a 'L' (like L1508).

But I recently found PLAAF JJ-7 with c/n A0607 and PLAAF JJ-7 with c/n L0607.
Could JJ-7 A0607 had a MLU (i.e. re-equipped with J-7E or J-7G systems?) and assigned the new suffix 'L'?

Jeroen


Wow ... you always learn something each day.

Even if by all i know early JJ-7 batches are called JJ-7 and later ones JJ-7A - as standard by the Chinese nomenclature - I never noticed this.
 

by78

Brigadier
J-8 assembly line from days of long past.

50860457013_dce549a0d9_k.jpg
 

Hendrik_2000

Brigadier
The sign of time J 7 will be retired soon
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China to replace J-7 fighter jets with advanced models
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Published: Mar 14, 2021 09:14 PM

Two J-7 fighter jets attached to an aviation brigade of the air force under the PLA Western Theater Command take off simultaneously for a live-fire flight training exercise on March 22, 2018. (eng.chinamil.com.cn/Photo by Xi Bobo and Cao Jiang)

Two J-7 fighter jets attached to an aviation brigade of the air force under the PLA Western Theater Command take off simultaneously for a live-fire flight training exercise on March 22, 2018. (eng.chinamil.com.cn/Photo by Xi Bobo and Cao Jiang)

The Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) Air Force has started to gradually decommission its fleet of J-7 fighter jets and replace them with more advanced, next generation ones, recent media reports revealed.

J-7 fighter jets attached to an aviation brigade affiliated with the PLA Western Theater Command Air Force recently conducted a series of combat-oriented exercises, and these exercises were the curtain call performance of the J-7s in this particular brigade, as the unit will receive new aircraft to replace them soon, China Central Television (CCTV) reported on Thursday.


In the exercises, a JJ-7, a trainer variation of the J-7 played the role of the enemy and two J-7s took off to intercept it, the report said.

As the main force in China's second-generation fighter jet fleet and the country's most experienced fighter jet currently still in service, the J-7 has a ceiling of more than 20,000 meters and a top speed of Mach two, making it the most high-reaching and fastest aircraft from the 1960s to the 1990s of the PLA and the absolute main force in fighting for aerial superiority, CCTV said.

Even today, it can integrate with third generation fighter jets and early warning aircraft to play unique roles in combat, CCTV reported, noting that the J-7 also trained pilot cadets to fly more advanced fighter jets.

The J-7 is a classic second-generation fighter jet that significantly contributed to safeguarding China's airspace, Wei Dongxu, a Beijing-based military expert, told the Global Times on Sunday.

China also ran a lot of modifications and upgrades on the J-7, gaining experiences in the process, and eventually developed variations like the JL-9 trainer jet, Wei said, noting that the J-7 also saw many export deals.

The PLA Air Force is now commissioning third-generation fighter jets in large numbers, including the J-10, J-11 and J-16, with fourth-generation fighter jet the J-20 also entering service, and it was only a matter of time before the outdated second-generation J-7 retires, analysts said.

Third-generation fighter jets like the J-10 perform better in both aerial combat and land attack, as their radar capability and maneuverability are superior to the J-7 in all fronts, Wei said.
 

by78

Brigadier
Oppositional research. A full-size model of J-8 is being hoisted into an anechoic chamber somewhere in America.

50998511550_bbd9b30369_o.jpg
 

Deino

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if i count correctly there are more than 2 dozen J7 units (including training ones), how long would the complete retirement take? i guess at least 5 years


This is via
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at the CDF after we had a discussion on this report

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"Deino, thanks for the check. You are right on 71 being in CTC. I've corrected it below and merely reflected it as a brigade since I'm assuming all fighter units have converted to brigades. I haven't noted any operational difference between how regiments are operated vis brigades yet.

On 94, this was previously under Nanjing (ETC) but later merged with Jinan MR training base - per scramble, which technically puts it under CTC. However scramble lists it under NTC (not sure why). Location wise, I think it is unlikely to be under NTC control but borderline between CTC & ETC. Considering the depot status, I would provisionally put it under CTC instead.

Updated.
CTC: 20 (Tangshan), 21 (Yanqing), 53 (Wudangshan), 71 (Xishanbeixiang), 94 (Xuzhou) – depot
STC: 27 (Pulandian), 52 (Wuhan), 132 (Xiangyun)
ETC: 42 (Zhangshu)
NTC: 44 (Bikeqi), 88 (Dandong), 91 (Liuhe)
WTC: 1 Tng Bde (Jiuquan), 2 Tng Bde (Hami) – only training units left

Article:China to replace J-7 fighter jets with advanced models
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I estimate J-7s may be withdrawn from combat service within the next 5 years and clearly won't go past this decade in frontline combat service."
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So in summary, he comes to the same conclusion! ;)
 
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Franklin

Captain
This is via
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at the CDF after we had a discussion on this report

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Deino, thanks for the check. You are right on 71 being in CTC. I've corrected it below and merely reflected it as a brigade since I'm assuming all fighter units have converted to brigades. I haven't noted any operational difference between how regiments are operated vis brigades yet.

On 94, this was previously under Nanjing (ETC) but later merged with Jinan MR training base - per scramble, which technically puts it under CTC. However scramble lists it under NTC (not sure why). Location wise, I think it is unlikely to be under NTC control but borderline between CTC & ETC. Considering the depot status, I would provisionally put it under CTC instead.

Updated.
CTC: 20 (Tangshan), 21 (Yanqing), 53 (Wudangshan), 71 (Xishanbeixiang), 94 (Xuzhou) – depot
STC: 27 (Pulandian), 52 (Wuhan), 132 (Xiangyun)
ETC: 42 (Zhangshu)
NTC: 44 (Bikeqi), 88 (Dandong), 91 (Liuhe)
WTC: 1 Tng Bde (Jiuquan), 2 Tng Bde (Hami) – only training units left

Article:China to replace J-7 fighter jets with advanced models
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I estimate J-7s may be withdrawn from combat service within the next 5 years and clearly won't go past this decade in frontline combat service."
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So in summary, he comes to the same conclusion! ;)
What does CTC, NTC and ETC mean ? And just how many J-7's are there in frontline service in total ?
 

crash8pilot

Junior Member
Registered Member
What does CTC, NTC and ETC mean ?
TC=Theater Command, C/N/E=Central/Northern/Eastern

And just how many J-7's are there in frontline service in total ?
Each fighter brigade has ~24-30 airframes. Afaik all frontline units have switched out their J-7/8s for 4+ generation fighters, remaining J-7 brigades serve as second line units or are used to retain pilot currency while the unit transitions to airframes fresh off the production line or older fighters (think Su-27SK/J-11As and older J-10As) rotated in from other units that have received new planes.
 
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