Taiwan Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


steel21

Junior Member
Registered Member
Excellent, walking (or rather rolling) war crime.

Disguising military equipment as civilian is not specifically listed as a war crime (because western special forces likes to use civilian vehicles for covert ops), but it would be pretty hard to argue against it being a war crime since doing so proactively endangers actual civilians by making it harder for opposing forces from positively distinguishing between military and civilian targets.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
Those vismods are useless.

I don't think they can function as IFV while in the vismod configuration, at least the turret is hampered.

Also, even with the vismods, they can operate in tactical formations, such as platoon wedge or stagger column. In order to blend in, these vehicles has to be dispersed and hidden. which more or less negates their combat effectiveness as part of a formation or unified command.

I also remember seeing them disguising a CM12 in a trash heap. Absolved of its mobility and much of its sensor, a tank is barely a functional pillbox, with very limited tactical impact in the C4ISR dominated modern mobile urban warfare.

This is the kind of shit you push around to full the ignorant masses. The energy and material it took to make that vismod can be better use in training. It says a lot about ROCA military leadership at the BN and below level if they go through with this nonsense, which is essentially a publicity stunt for the masses and froggy politicians.
 

Mr T

Senior Member
I think China will be able to takeover Taiwan without a fight once China achieves enough large GDP and military power. Taiwanese will essentially negotiate terms.
Beyond 2050 anything is possible. However, if the CCP wants peaceful absorption of Taiwan I think it would help being clearer about what post-unification for Taiwan means. Hong Kong was supposed to be the model for Taiwan, but given the events of the last 12 months it's unlikely to be desirable. Xi recently offering "Hong Kong Plus" is equally unhelpful, because it still suggests a form of autonomy that is at its core an illusion.

Also, unless Taipei sells out the island and lets the PLA just walk in to occupy it, negotiating Taiwanese politics would be difficult. Merging with the PRC means constitutional change, which in turn requires a supermajority in the legislative yuan and a successful public referendum. For that to happen would require decades of political engagement from Beijing (8 years of KMT rule with Ma didn't even get initial talks on political methods to achieve unification) and ideally no more military threats, as well as some sort of way to protect Taiwanese autonomy without the CCP having the right to revoke or curtail it because they were unhappy with an election result.

This is exactly what is happening now with Taiwanese provoking China pretty much every day by introducing bills to change national emblem, remove reunification clause from the constitution and changing the passport.
These are pretty minor issues that don't do anything to change the de jure position so cannot be called a provocation. Taiwan isn't even proposing to change its constitutional claims to bits of territory the PRC has surrendered to its neighbours.

There are also practical reasons for wanting to make those changes. For example, breaking the link the KMT fostered between itself and the ROC state. Taiwan is now a multi-party state, so it is understandable if non-KMT parties want to make it harder for it to pretend to be the natural party of government.

Similarly, as Taiwanese passport holders can get visa waivers to a much larger number of countries than Chinese ones do, there could be benefits in emphasising the difference to avoid confusion. Few immigration officers outside of Asia are going to immediately understand the difference between the ROC and PRC, but Taiwan is a lot clearer.
They can for example Fly over Taiwan and shoot down some Taiwanese planes. For even more forceful response, They can destroy some air force bases or defense installations.

A strong action would be to destroy all of Taiwan's Air force and air defenses and create a Chinese control Air space over Taiwan.
That's going to escalate matters, not act as a "warning". China could conceivably avoid a full military escalation or unilateral declaration of independence with an "accidental" shooting down of a single ROCAF plane. But intentionally attacking the Taiwanese military will probably lead to a UDI, because the assumption will be that an invasion is going to follow within the next 6-12 months. It would also have a high risk of making the US recognise Taiwan diplomatically or positioning military assets in a direct position to protect Taiwan.

If China wants to avoid conflict, destroying military assets and killing people isn't the way to do it. Waiting until past 2050 as you initially suggested would be much more sensible.
 

druid198405

New Member
Registered Member
This is an article about taiwan's next generation fighter jet. Basically, it looks just like a souped-up version of the IDF. Electronics aside which I assume Taiwan one can do well (looks at TSMC) my biggest concern would have to be the engine and overall cost. The engine still seems underpowered, and the overall cost is a lot lower than what Korea is spending.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 

Skywatcher

Captain
This is an article about taiwan's next generation fighter jet. Basically, it looks just like a souped-up version of the IDF. Electronics aside which I assume Taiwan one can do well (looks at TSMC) my biggest concern would have to be the engine and overall cost. The engine still seems underpowered, and the overall cost is a lot lower than what Korea is spending.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
Anything larger or more advanced than the Gripen E will be a waste of time and money (and even a IDF-II of that category might still break the back of the ROCAF budget).
 

gelgoog

Captain
Registered Member
The ROC basically needs a twin-engine aircraft because it is an island nation. I think they should just buy Super Hornets.
 

voyager1

Senior Member
Registered Member
Has Taiwan announced that they are buying any asymmetric capabilities? I dont think China would be bothered too much if Taiwan spend their limited resources on expensive and easily destroyed items.

iMO, China would be far more worried if Taiwan was investing in mines, EW systems, drones, submarines, midget submarines, mobile units, building a lot of missiles etc.
 

Skywatcher

Captain
Has Taiwan announced that they are buying any asymmetric capabilities? I dont think China would be bothered too much if Taiwan spend their limited resources on expensive and easily destroyed items.

iMO, China would be far more worried if Taiwan was investing in mines, EW systems, drones, submarines, midget submarines, mobile units, building a lot of missiles etc.
They are, but they're going to face a budget crunch in the next 5-10 years if they insist on pursuing both paths (and some of the drones and the submarines are not optimized for an asymmetric campaign).
 

druid198405

New Member
Registered Member
I've done some googling and this picture from the article appears to be a photoshopped image from Stavatti aerospace. I do suspect that the final aircraft might look similar due to the stealthy design and engine, but maybe it could be twin engined for better performance.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 
Hahaha they just shopped out the second seat, that's why the cockpit is so weirdly big
Second pilot heard the missile warning and bailed. First one's still checking his cellphone to see what causes that ring tone LOL

Yes I know he can't have ejected with the canopy still there; it's a joke, just like the "design."
 

Top