Pakistan Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


ohan_qwe

Junior Member
How creditable do you think Pakistan air support for taliban is?

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The fight for the border comes as a war of words heated up between the Kabul government and Islamabad after the Afghan Vice President accused the Pakistani military of providing "close air support to Taliban in certain areas".

Pakistan strongly denied the claim, with a foreign ministry statement saying the country "took necessary measures within its territory to safeguard our own troops and population".
 

plawolf

Brigadier
How creditable do you think Pakistan air support for taliban is?

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The fight for the border comes as a war of words heated up between the Kabul government and Islamabad after the Afghan Vice President accused the Pakistani military of providing "close air support to Taliban in certain areas".

Pakistan strongly denied the claim, with a foreign ministry statement saying the country "took necessary measures within its territory to safeguard our own troops and population".
Seems possible at least. Pretty much everyone thinks the US puppet government is a dead man standing with the US cutting and running, so Pakistan has little to loose and everything to gain to help the Taliban come to power quicker.
 

schrage musik

New Member
Registered Member
How creditable do you think Pakistan air support for taliban is?

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The fight for the border comes as a war of words heated up between the Kabul government and Islamabad after the Afghan Vice President accused the Pakistani military of providing "close air support to Taliban in certain areas".

Pakistan strongly denied the claim, with a foreign ministry statement saying the country "took necessary measures within its territory to safeguard our own troops and population".

This is most likely propaganda from the kabul regime. The rumor was spread by Amrullah Saleh, the afghan vice president and former chief of the notorious afghan NDS. Nobody is taking it seriously.
 

Mohsin77

Junior Member
Registered Member
Seems possible at least. Pretty much everyone thinks the US puppet government is a dead man standing with the US cutting and running, so Pakistan has little to loose and everything to gain to help the Taliban come to power quicker.

Not too quick though. We need a political solution and not complete chaos. This is also in the Taliban's own interest, as they want to govern a stable country. The Kabul govt needs to surrender politically and accept a 'junior-partner' role under an inevitable Taliban government. The Taliban have given a timeline of a month to present their peace plan, which Kabul needs to accept.
 

ohan_qwe

Junior Member
Seems possible at least. Pretty much everyone thinks the US puppet government is a dead man standing with the US cutting and running, so Pakistan has little to loose and everything to gain to help the Taliban come to power quicker.
Pakistan that is close to China and anti India could soon find itself in US sanction list. I wonder what geopolitical reason US have for not treating Pakistan like Iran.
 

plawolf

Brigadier
Pakistan that is close to China and anti India could soon find itself in US sanction list. I wonder what geopolitical reason US have for not treating Pakistan like Iran.

Well, previously they needed Pakistan ‘on side’, or at least not actively working against them to make their positions in Afghanistan somewhat viable. So their withdrawal does make serious sanctions more feasible.

However, I think the bigger question would be just how viable said sanctions can be.

Sanctions on Iran only works due to UN backing and active EU support, with both Russia and China not really in opposition due to their good relations with other regional powers that are downright hostile to Iran.

No such conditions for sanctions against Pakistan.

The EU has little reason to get involved, especially since China will throw its full weight behind Pakistan, so the EU trying to actually enforce said sanctions will result in a de facto economic war with China, which the EU have zero appetite for.

The US alone imposing sanctions on Pakistan will be painful, but hardly unbearably or cripplingly so.
 

Kaeshmiri

Junior Member
Registered Member
Pakistan that is close to China and anti India could soon find itself in US sanction list. I wonder what geopolitical reason US have for not treating Pakistan like Iran.
1. Access to Central Asia (which after the withdrawal wont be as important but nevertheless NATO would still need it)

2. Sanctioning Pak and destabilizing it isn't a good idea as Pak is a nuclear power. Thats the reason US always pressured Pak upto a point but never went beyond. There are plenty of extremist groups in the region who would love to get a hold on some of those nukes.
 

Mohsin77

Junior Member
Registered Member
Instead of sanctions, the US is being extra lenient on Pakistan right now vis a vis the IMF renegotiations, which are crucial for continued growth. It's actually surprising how Pakistan has rejected the IMF's demands and proposed alternatives, which the IMF is actually agreeing to for now (this usually never happens, just ask any of the other countries which the IMF has ever lent to.)

Once the US exit is complete and Afghanistan is stable (saving the US from further embarrassment), there is the possibility they will turn the pressure back on, but Pakistan only needs a small window of time in order to accelerate economic growth, which the PTI+Army need to win the next election with enough support so that they can perform a thorough restructuring.

The US also recently requested Pakistan to distance itself from China, which Pakistan flatly rejected in a very bold public statement, causing embarrassment for the US. It was a signal to Washington that our strategic position is strong enough that pressure won't work. This is why Biden is officially distant, but in reality, the US is going with the flow, for now.
 

j17wang

Junior Member
Registered Member
Instead of sanctions, the US is being extra lenient on Pakistan right now vis a vis the IMF renegotiations, which are crucial for continued growth. It's actually surprising how Pakistan has rejected the IMF's demands and proposed alternatives, which the IMF is actually agreeing to for now (this usually never happens, just ask any of the other countries which the IMF has ever lent to.)

Once the US exit is complete and Afghanistan is stable (saving the US from further embarrassment), there is the possibility they will turn the pressure back on, but Pakistan only needs a small window of time in order to accelerate economic growth, which the PTI+Army need to win the next election with enough support so that they can perform a thorough restructuring.

The US also recently requested Pakistan to distance itself from China, which Pakistan flatly rejected in a very bold public statement, causing embarrassment for the US. It was a signal to Washington that our strategic position is strong enough that pressure won't work. This is why Biden is officially distant, but in reality, the US is going with the flow, for now.

China can offer pakistan much more than the US ever could. Pakistan understands that right now, the US has thrown all its weight behind an expansionist hindutva India. Considering that, the notion of US as an ally of pakistan is completely laughable.
 

Mohsin77

Junior Member
Registered Member
It's not all about who can offer what... If we thought like that, we would've recognized Israel decades ago. It's the principle of the thing, and we have our own issues with the US, who also has no support within our population, regardless of whatever their offer is.
 

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