Natural disasters thread


siegecrossbow

Lieutenant General
Staff member
Super Moderator
So it begins.

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Provincial leader in Zhejiang are being proactive with the Typhoon rescue measures.

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DarkStar

Junior Member
Registered Member
Used to be that in the West, there was a perception or attitude that climate change would really only affect the third world developing nations and that white countries wouldn't need to worry too much about it.
Fast forward to today and now we're seeing wildfires, drought, mass flooding in first world nations like the US, germany, australia.
I don't hear much opposition to climate change now compared to 10 years ago.
 

KYli

Brigadier
Don't want to sound like "that guy" , but the tunnel was like 2 miles long which means a 1 mile walk if you picked the right direction. One of the guy interview by globaltimes who decided to flee early when the water reach his 3/4 wheels said the water cover the top of the cars by 20 minutes once he got to elevated ground. He mention stuborn people did not leave even as he was warning them while walking / banging on their cars. Maybe there are escape stairs in the middle.
Most people fled when they see others were fleeing. Twenty minutes is more than enough time to escape. Another interview I watched, the guy said that he was able to convince most people to flee with him. It is just human nature when you see the water is rising and people are fleeing then you would do the same.
 

weig2000

Senior Member
Zhengzhou government did send out red alert through text message. However, most people dismissed it due to the fact that a red alert in Henan for heavy rain never was a concern. So people just go on with their business without paying much attention. The Zhengzhou government did fail to shut down the subway and roads and tunnels that is on the government. To be honest, I doubt anyone expected things would deteriorate this quickly.

My question is: Is a rainfall of such magnitude forecastable? It's hard to believe that weather forecasting did not see any sign of it. And if it's forecastable within a reasonable range of time, the subway and tunnels should be shutdown. There are probably still some lessons that can be learned from this disaster. They'll have to review everything.
 

KYli

Brigadier
My question is: Is a rainfall of such magnitude forecastable? It's hard to believe that weather forecasting did not see any sign of it. And if it's forecastable within a reasonable range of time, the subway and tunnels should be shutdown. There are probably still some lessons that can be learned from this disaster. They'll have to review everything.
I don't think the Zhengzhou government realized the magnitude of the rainfall until much later. However, it doesn't dissolve the fact that the Zhengzhou government should be held accountable for not having an emergency response plan. Many coastal provinces over the years have learned to adopt an emergency response toward evacuating its citizens even if there were uncertainty over the severity of the typhoon. Same thing with the Zhengzhou government, even though it might not anticipate the magnitude and severity, it still should have closed the tunnel and shut down the subway as a precaution.
 

solarz

Brigadier
Zhengzhou government did send out red alert through text message. However, most people dismissed it due to the fact that a red alert in Henan for heavy rain never was a concern. So people just go on with their business without paying much attention. The Zhengzhou government did fail to shut down the subway and roads and tunnels that is on the government. To be honest, I doubt anyone expected things would deteriorate this quickly.

My question is: Is a rainfall of such magnitude forecastable? It's hard to believe that weather forecasting did not see any sign of it. And if it's forecastable within a reasonable range of time, the subway and tunnels should be shutdown. There are probably still some lessons that can be learned from this disaster. They'll have to review everything.

Considering they sent out an alert, they probably forecasted the rainfall, but failed to predict the extent of disaster.
 

weig2000

Senior Member
I don't think the Zhengzhou government realized the magnitude of the rainfall until much later. However, it doesn't dissolve the fact that the Zhengzhou government should be held accountable for not having an emergency response plan. Many coastal provinces over the years have learned to adopt an emergency response toward evacuating its citizens even if there were uncertainty over the severity of the typhoon. Same thing with the Zhengzhou government, even though it might not anticipate the magnitude and severity, it still should have closed the tunnel and shut down the subway as a precaution.

Considering they sent out an alert, they probably forecasted the rainfall, but failed to predict the extent of disaster.

Yeah, it's probably the case that heavy rainfall was forecasted, and it was severe enough for the government to send out an alert. Still they have never had experienced such thing before, say the subway gets flooded or tunnels gets filled up even if not as bad as this time. It's just off their experience chart as an inland city.

I hope all the inland cities will learn from the lesson and establish procedures for alerts and other appropriate precautionary measures.
 

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