Infantry Combat Equipment (non-firearm): Vests, Body Armor, NVGs, etc.


MwRYum

Major
These drills have 0 practical use. I don't know why China keeps doing these kinds of training.
This is the kind of things that recruiter won't tell you but universally does once in.

Or perhaps because the Sino-India "skirmishes" has been knuckles-and-legs-and-stick-and-shield affair, even during the tense period of the last 12 month, you think that the basic craft can be ignored?

Who could guarantee that it won't go hot this afternoon because Modi need to have the ratings up by 10%+?

Or who could guarantee that Sleepy Joe decided that "US need to go all the way" to make China yield?

Even with all the fancy gear, it's always up to the infantrymen to carry the final yards and finish the job.
 

Sunbud

Junior Member
Registered Member
Doesn't matter how much high tech big budget gear you have. Infantry will almost always have to close with the enemy to finish the job. Rifle, grenade and bayonet. Often in a more brutal and desperate struggle than we see in these drills, but that is how its done.
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But the. Again we’ve never seen a proper documentary that follows PLA recruit training in any sort of detail. They normally only show the first few days of receiving and familiarising the recruits, and a few snippets of range practice and obstacle course. We are not shown the rest like camouflage, going on exercises, assaulting an enemy position, punishments for failing a room or weapon inspection, conducting ambushes, CBRN Warfare etc. PLA recruit training is near enough 6 months, it should be relatively comprehensive. And this is of course excluding continued learning, training and professional development which the PLA places emphasis on throughout a soldier’s career.
 

voyager1

Junior Member
Registered Member
Usually in the military, stupid drills are mainly to enforce discipline.
How else can you ensure people are going to stay in line besides making them do a mindnumbing activity without freaking out and screaming "WTF"?
I can easily see them when they have nothing to do in the army bases their officers can have them do these exercises at the afternoon so they are constantly busy.

So nothing harmful with these drills, they enforce discipline, and they have something to do when they dont have any other job to do.

Remember, bored soldiers = trouble.
 

supersnoop

Junior Member
Registered Member
I can easily see them when they have nothing to do in the army bases their officers can have them do these exercises at the afternoon so they are constantly busy.

So nothing harmful with these drills, they enforce discipline, and they have something to do when they dont have any other job to do.

Remember, bored soldiers = trouble.
Well from their location, I'm not sure there's a lot of trouble to get into.
That being said, I wouldn't be surprised if most of the drill was just adapting certain things for TV.

What I do find questionable is the dropping to prone with the pack on. That is really bad for your back, and not the standard practice which is why there are usually quick release straps. That being said, my guess they are just filled with a little bit of clothes to puff it up.
 

Aniah

Junior Member
Registered Member
I just find those rolls on the ground at 0:40 rather redundant and make no tactical sense.

Also shooting while running. There is no way to maintain aim like that.
I don't think it meant to actually hit the target but to keep them suppressed enough to push forward. Sometimes you will be in angles where a machine gunner won't be able to hit especially if you are charging or moving forward.
 

tch1972

New Member
I don't think it meant to actually hit the target but to keep them suppressed enough to push forward. Sometimes you will be in angles where a machine gunner won't be able to hit especially if you are charging or moving forward.

Suppression fire should mainly come from SAW and GMPG.
 

plawolf

Brigadier
Well from their location, I'm not sure there's a lot of trouble to get into.
That being said, I wouldn't be surprised if most of the drill was just adapting certain things for TV.

What I do find questionable is the dropping to prone with the pack on. That is really bad for your back, and not the standard practice which is why there are usually quick release straps. That being said, my guess they are just filled with a little bit of clothes to puff it up.
This is a good example of where I think western ‘combat experience’ against rag tag jihadis will come back to bite them hard on their backsides in combat against a peer or near-peer opponent.

Dropping packs only make sense when you always win the fight and win it easily so can come back afterwards to reclaim them. That might be so against the odd local farmer using his grandad’s second hand AK, but if you do that when fighting against a peer opponent, you are fucked.

Congratulations, your entire unit has just dumped the bulk of its equipment, supplies and ammo out in the open and within sight and range of the enemy dug in positions. Good luck winning that engagement without 24/7 unimpeded friendly air and artillery support and being able to call in armour to back you up any time you want.

Also, if you are fighting against enemy professional soldiers with good rifles and modern optics, it’s not a good idea to be jogging away while messing about with quick release flaps. In which case hitting the dirt as quickly as possible will save lives, as will the ability to rapidly move while prone or crouched. The forward roll might look stupid, and will probably hurt, but it will get you out of the danger zone a lot faster and safer than crawling or hunched running.
 

LawLeadsToPeace

Junior Member
Registered Member
This is a good example of where I think western ‘combat experience’ against rag tag jihadis will come back to bite them hard on their backsides in combat against a peer or near-peer opponent.

Dropping packs only make sense when you always win the fight and win it easily so can come back afterwards to reclaim them. That might be so against the odd local farmer using his grandad’s second hand AK, but if you do that when fighting against a peer opponent, you are fucked.

Congratulations, your entire unit has just dumped the bulk of its equipment, supplies and ammo out in the open and within sight and range of the enemy dug in positions. Good luck winning that engagement without 24/7 unimpeded friendly air and artillery support and being able to call in armour to back you up any time you want.

Also, if you are fighting against enemy professional soldiers with good rifles and modern optics, it’s not a good idea to be jogging away while messing about with quick release flaps. In which case hitting the dirt as quickly as possible will save lives, as will the ability to rapidly move while prone or crouched. The forward roll might look stupid, and will probably hurt, but it will get you out of the danger zone a lot faster and safer than crawling or hunched running.
Well from their location, I'm not sure there's a lot of trouble to get into.
That being said, I wouldn't be surprised if most of the drill was just adapting certain things for TV.

What I do find questionable is the dropping to prone with the pack on. That is really bad for your back, and not the standard practice which is why there are usually quick release straps. That being said, my guess they are just filled with a little bit of clothes to puff it up.

According to this US veteran(link to response:
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), aside from the usual nationalistic jargon usually spewed by soldiers of all nations, he mentioned this at the end of his response: "We immediately return fire, locate the threat [then] [manuever] to cover. Once there we drop the rucks so we can be much more mobile and faster. Sometimes we use the ruck as a supported firing position. You name it. But that Ruck is your lifeline".

So, no, they don't dump their ruck immediately and then run for cover. In fact, they keep it with them until they get cover. So in the case of the Chinese troops doing prone manuevers with rucks on, I would guess that they are practicing for a scenario in which there is no cover. Yes, it's bad for their back, but they have to prepare for the worst scenario. That is just part of their job. As for the barrel roll, I question its usefulness. Its great as an exercise for keeping the body nimble. Otherwise, all it does is hinder your ability to return fire.
 

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