Hong-Kong Protests


AssassinsMace

Brigadier
Something that has always sat weird with me about these riots is that the terrorists wear black t-shirts and you can see their arms are so skinny they look like the type to get shoved into lockers 3 times a week at school. If someone like that got in my face, I couldn't even take him seriously; I'd think some asshole frat was putting this nerd up to it (which is probably an extremely accurate analogy in this case). When they get violent in a group, it looks like an anime convention gone wild; my eyes see it but my head is still trying to wrap around what I'm looking at... I guess the best comparison would be how your brain feels if it were to see an 85 pound 12 year old Asian kid with glasses wearing a dew rag, XXL t-shirt, fake gold chains, tattoos covering both arms, come-up to you and spit slang and curses in your face.
Yes it's interesting. When there are riots here in the US, you would see multiple columns of smoke rising into the sky. Even with fire these protestors seem impotent. The guy that got shot... Was he stupid or crazy going after a policeman pointing a gun at him? When protestors tried to harass the PLA garrison in Hong Kong, they seem to break it up quickly on their own. Were they afraid of getting shot? I mentioned this before but maybe there's a cult involved. The Falun Gong sprung up from nowhere supposedly shocking the communists of their existence. Taiwan has the largest number of cults per capita in the world. Why would Hong Kong be any different?
 

Equation

Lieutenant General
You don't need to be interested in politics to be know your identity.

Huawei experienced a surge of sales in China after being targeted by the US. Most of those who opted for Huawei instead of Apple or Samsung probably never thought of politics.

The problem with HK is not a disinterest in politics, it's the fact that a large segment of the population do not feel pride at being Chinese.
Yup, all thanks to decades of no real Chinese history being taught at school during British rule as well as brainwashed by religious institutions.
 

supersnoop

Junior Member
Registered Member
Cultural Revolution didn't die on its own. What's happening in HK now is very very similar to what happened during the Cultural Revolution
Everyone sees the parallels, but there's a huge difference, no Jiang Qiang. Someone mentioned the idea of "leaderlessness" was a tactic to maximize chaos. It's working well. Just to continue on the cult mentality road, many of these radicals have turned on their own parents who tell them not to engage in the violence.

You don't need to be interested in politics to be know your identity.

Huawei experienced a surge of sales in China after being targeted by the US. Most of those who opted for Huawei instead of Apple or Samsung probably never thought of politics.

The problem with HK is not a disinterest in politics, it's the fact that a large segment of the population do not feel pride at being Chinese.
That's probably true for the radical and anti-PRC groups, I don't think that's true for the "silent majority" that was being discussed. If you were totally apolitical, a strong China is good for the economy from an HK perspective. There are some non-political downsides, loss of Cantonese identity, even more crowding, but I don't think those things alone would create a feeling that you are "not Chinese".

I still say that the "silent majority" is not apathetic, but simply at a loss when it comes to a solution. "If the police/government can't solve it, what can I do?"

As an aside, Huawei's surge in sales isn't simply because of patriotism, they have some of the best engineered camera modules, best non-Apple phone/tablet CPU, some of the first 5G phones. It was as much a coincidence as it was politics.

Something that has always sat weird with me about these riots is that the terrorists wear black t-shirts and you can see their arms are so skinny they look like the type to get shoved into lockers 3 times a week at school.
Not the first time someone has pointed this out. They are so weak looking, just sad really. Someone get these guys some steak, eggs, and some milk!
Anyone Asian and 180+ lbs. stands out like a sore thumb there.

Great video of foreigners telling it how it is!
Allan Zeman is not a "foreigner". He has lived in HK for decades. Sadly, this is precisely the sort of atmosphere that the rioters have created. They are extremist in their identity, that even Taiwanese students are leaving.
 

vincent

Senior Member
Everyone sees the parallels, but there's a huge difference, no Jiang Qiang. Someone mentioned the idea of "leaderlessness" was a tactic to maximize chaos. It's working well. Just to continue on the cult mentality road, many of these radicals have turned on their own parents who tell them not to engage in the violence.
Jiang Qing was a cheerleader, not a leader. No one controlled the Red Guards. The Western media is the cheerleader now, just like Jiang Qing. The Chinese government had to sent an entire generation of teenagers to the country side to stop the madness. No such option exists today. HK will continue to rot and China as a whole will not be affected by it.
 

Pika

Junior Member
Registered Member
the bottom-line question
Is Beijing ready to step in to stop Hong Kong protests?
the article basically answers with 'no'; follow the link
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
if interested
They don't need to. Just sit back, watch the city implode--the economy already is. The violence from those in blacks is already dwindling the number of protesters. The movement loses its attractiveness to those in HK and abroad. Of course some will still blame the police but others will start blaming the protesters.

Beijing just needs to sit back and wait as they destroy their own city. From the ashes, HK will never be same; more tightly controlled than ever.
 

supersnoop

Junior Member
Registered Member
Jiang Qing was a cheerleader, not a leader. No one controlled the Red Guards. The Western media is the cheerleader now, just like Jiang Qing. The Chinese government had to sent an entire generation of teenagers to the country side to stop the madness. No such option exists today. HK will continue to rot and China as a whole will not be affected by it.
The idea is still the same, it's the message is that "This stops now, we are starting from the top". There is no "top" to speak of, maybe the student union leaders? They should probably capture surveillance of them shooting an arrow or throwing a molotov. I'm sure they've done something stupid. Try them in court of public opinion first, then go in for the coup de grace and arrest them. By "leaking" the evidence ahead of time, only the most radical of the group will remain so steadfast.

Sadly, I almost think this generation needs to be sent to the countryside to learn what a hard life is like.
"This is what happens when you destroy everything, this is what your parents/grandparents worked so hard to avoid"

It doesn't even have to be like a hard labour camp, just a really poor village for like 6 months. Those ones where they are still burning coal or collecting sticks for heat. The deal can be, no prison/no criminal record for non-bodily assault charges, but you have to go to these poor villages as community service.
 

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