CV-17 Shandong (002 carrier) Thread I ...News, Views and operations


Anlsvrthng

Senior Member
Registered Member
There are videos in the internet. Only one fighter can be liftet and the pitot tube has to be tilted down.

True.


The lift run with higher speed than on the sightseeing video.

Means it running with variable speed.

So, the hangar-deck movement only four times slower than on the Nimitz.
 

Intrepid

Captain
shilang-hangar-00.jpg

I found a deck plan of Kuznetsov on my computer. With 002 it should be the same arrangement of bulkheads and rooms:

Kuznetsov_Decksplaene.jpg

Your hangar plan seems to be a little to optimistic.
 

Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
I am hoping we quickly see her deck repainted and her go to sea, with J-15s flying out to her at sea and lading onto her to truly begin testing her.

I find it amazing, as quickly as they moved for with the Liaoning that here we are, two years now since she was launched, and we have not seen her working up her airwing yet...nothing like what we saw with the Liaoning.

The Liaoning was completed by the end of July in 2011. She went to sea the first time in August 2011. In Novemebr of 2012, her aircraft began landing on her decks and they moved over the space of a year or so, always a little more aircraft to where she ultimately got 14 aircraft working up off of her decks. She was commissioned in November 2012. A little over a year to 18 months later she was operating with 14 or more J-15s.

The new carrier was launched 26 April 2017, and her first sea trials were 23 April 2018...a year ago. . We have not seen a J-15 on her deck yet...two years after her launch,a year after her first sea trials.

15 months after the Liaoning first went to sea, she was commissioned and had had J-15s operating off of her in small numbers. I expect after she gets her deck painted and goes to sea, that we may well see her first deplyment of J-15s in her next naval trials, starting with a few, and then over a nine-12 month time frame increasing. It will probably about three years after launch before we see her with those 14+ J-15s on her decks is my guess at this point.

The PLAN is very methodical about what it does. She is still producing J-15s I believe and she will produce them until she has the second air wing completed.

Time will tell all.
 

gelgoog

Captain
Registered Member
I am hoping we quickly see her deck repainted and her go to sea, with J-15s flying out to her at sea and lading onto her to truly begin testing her.

I find it amazing, as quickly as they moved for with the Liaoning that here we are, two years now since she was launched, and we have not seen her working up her airwing yet...nothing like what we saw with the Liaoning.

The Liaoning was completed by the end of July in 2011. She went to sea the first time in August 2011. In Novemebr of 2012, her aircraft began landing on her decks and they moved over the space of a year or so, always a little more aircraft to where she ultimately got 14 aircraft working up off of her decks. She was commissioned in November 2012. A little over a year to 18 months later she was operating with 14 or more J-15s.

The new carrier was launched 26 April 2017, and her first sea trials were 23 April 2018...a year ago. . We have not seen a J-15 on her deck yet...two years after her launch,a year after her first sea trials.

15 months after the Liaoning first went to sea, she was commissioned and had had J-15s operating off of her in small numbers. I expect after she gets her deck painted and goes to sea, that we may well see her first deplyment of J-15s in her next naval trials, starting with a few, and then over a nine-12 month time frame increasing. It will probably about three years after launch before we see her with those 14+ J-15s on her decks is my guess at this point.

The PLAN is very methodical about what it does. She is still producing J-15s I believe and she will produce them until she has the second air wing completed.

Time will tell all.

To be honest I also expected them to proceed more quickly. But it is quite likely this carrier has a lower priority than we think.
This might be more a proof of ability ship to guarantee they dominate the carrier construction process, this is not a carrier they want to put into service and manufacture in quantity.

In a way it reminds me of the Chinese human space program. Which has a lot of milestones, sometimes many years apart, and is made in deliberate steps to get to a point where they can make something like a Mir space station. But with a lot of steps in between which basically replicate most of the Soviet space program in terms of milestones. Like manned orbital mission, dual manned orbital mission, spacewalk, etc.

The program is deliberately made this way to ensure they understand the technology properly and get a firm grip on how it works. This means they have less of a chance of having a program failure because of aiming for a technology which is too complex for them to dominate. The Chinese had a lot of issues like that during the Great Leap Forward era like their civilian airliner or heavy tank programs.

The goal of the CV-17 might have been not to get a working carrier in use quickly but to evaluate their large ship construction and integration methods. That's why they are having such a long and morose demonstration and evaluation program. Any issues they find in the process of building CV-17 will be rectified in CV-18/CV-19 while they are still under construction.

In a way going for EMALS in the next carriers is a considerable risk for them and goes against this kind of development process.
 
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