COMAC C919

gelgoog

Brigadier
Registered Member
Yes. Without the joint licensing process it will take a lot of time. EASA might even demand to make modifications to the aircraft. Still it seems like something worth trying. At least one company in Europe, Ryanair, entertained the idea of buying the C919 at one point. Which is more than I can say for the US market. The order from GECAS in the US doesn't count since it is just a token gesture. Basically a vote of confidence because it uses the CFM Leap engine. It took Airbus decades to properly crack the US market. It is really though to sell an aircraft there that competes with Boeing.
 

weig2000

Captain
Yes. Without the joint licensing process it will take a lot of time. EASA might even demand to make modifications to the aircraft. Still it seems like something worth trying. At least one company in Europe, Ryanair, entertained the idea of buying the C919 at one point. Which is more than I can say for the US market. The order from GECAS in the US doesn't count since it is just a token gesture. Basically a vote of confidence because it uses the CFM Leap engine. It took Airbus decades to properly crack the US market. It is really though to sell an aircraft there that competes with Boeing.

GE has joint venture with AVIC,
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, to develop and market avionics solutions. They're a
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to C919. This is the main reason that GECAS had signed
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(LOI) for 10 C919's with five firm purchases and options for five additional aircraft even back in 2010, as a vote of confidence. LEAP-1C is from CFM, a 50-50 joint venture between GE Aerospace and French SNECMA. GE is much less concerned about CFM's reputation than that of Aviage Systems, a relatively new venture in a mature market with much more established suppliers.
 

tphuang

Lieutenant General
Staff member
Super Moderator
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Registered Member
Yes. Without the joint licensing process it will take a lot of time. EASA might even demand to make modifications to the aircraft. Still it seems like something worth trying. At least one company in Europe, Ryanair, entertained the idea of buying the C919 at one point. Which is more than I can say for the US market. The order from GECAS in the US doesn't count since it is just a token gesture. Basically a vote of confidence because it uses the CFM Leap engine. It took Airbus decades to properly crack the US market. It is really though to sell an aircraft there that competes with Boeing.
Ryanair will never buy c919.

if you want to certify with easa. They have to be involved from the beginning. It’s an entirely bureaucratic system to protect incumbents.
 

taxiya

Brigadier
Registered Member
Here is the Chinese copy of the CAAC/EASA certification agreement if anyone is interested in knowing how it works.
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1704564819396.png
1704564873941.png

In case of C919, 审定当局 (certification authority) is CAAC, 认可当局 (acknoledge/acceptance authority) is EASA.

Chapter 4.4.4.2
Acceptance authority shall issue certification when all of the following conditions are fullfilled
  1. Certification authority has issued its own certification.
  2. Certification autority has provied evidences that the product fulfills chapter 4.4.3
  3. All extra issues that Acceptance authority raised during the acceptance phase have been addressed.
  4. Applicant (COMAC) has fulfilled other requirements.
Item 3 is EASA's work right now. Assuming CAAC and COMAC work proactively, they would have provided their documents to EASA during CAAC's certification process, EASA would be able to conduct its acceptance procedure almost simutanously with CAAC's certification prcedure. I don't know how long (extra) time EASA needs to finish its part, but can't be years.

Also from the agreement, CAAC would be conducting acceptance procedure for any future Airbus types. So I think it is to the best interests of both sides to keep it to professionalism.
 
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HeiTangSeng

New Member
Registered Member
China Eastern seems to be confident enough with C919 to put the first C919 (B919A) in commercial service (MU5137/5138) on the SHA-PKX route. After the inaugural flights MU9191/9192 on May 28, 2023, this is the first time C919 will be in regular service between Shanghai Hongqiao and Beijing Daxing.

I can't find any English or Chinese press releases about this. Here are some screen shots from my China Eastern app and 航旅纵横.
C919MU5138PKX-SHA20240109.jpgC919MU5137B919A.jpgC919MU5137SHA-PKX20240109.jpg
 

Overbom

Brigadier
Registered Member
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Some 737 max are again grounded...a 3 months old plane. Comac 919 is clearly an asset need to be made in numbers asap !
The lesson here is not to rush with anything. Slow and steady is the name of the game, especially for a newcomer in the aircraft building industry.

Comac 919 should be extensively tested in real world commercial usage first before aggressively ramping up production rate
 

Atomicfrog

Captain
Registered Member
The lesson here is not to rush with anything. Slow and steady is the name of the game, especially for a newcomer in the aircraft building industry.

Comac 919 should be extensively tested in real world commercial usage first before aggressively ramping up production rate
For sure but in the meantime, it's important to aggressively ramping up funding rate and put all the necessaries fondations to make that aircraft independent of foreign influences. That aircraft right now is the corner stone of China commercial aviation. Cost of CJ-1000 vs Leap 1C is not a concern if it deliver near the same performances. Just losing some money with it for Chinese government is way better than getting messed up with Boing/Airbus duopoly.
 
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