Chinese shipbuilding industry


ThatNiceType055

New Member
Registered Member
Why are new orders declining? Is it because of too many orders the previous year?
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Here is the stat of ship industry 2022, the columns are world, South korean, Japan and China respectively.
Basically you have three stats, shipbuilding output which is the first two rows, new order which is the next two rows, and total unfinished order which is the last two rows. You can see that the number in the last two rows is much larger.
Usually there will be a cycle in which in some years China get a lot of new orders, and in next year SK get a lot of new orders. But now everybody in the industry is getting orders, because the global demand for new ships is huge.
 
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Tam

Brigadier
Registered Member
Prices are going up. I wonder how it will affect the PLAN naval buildup.


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"Ship prices, in nominal terms, are now at their highest level since 2009. Further increases are likely, as raw material and energy prices continue to climb.

Newbuilding prices vary across ship types, Clarkson noted, with container ships climbing most. A 15,500 teu vessel now costs close to 50% more than it did 15 months ago, at the beginning of 2021. Capesize bulkers are up by almost a third, MR tankers by 21%, and LNG carriers by some 18%.

The price of steel is one factor, with Chinese plate costing more than $800 a tonne, up by $250 over the last 24 months. "
 

sndef888

Senior Member
Registered Member
Prices are going up. I wonder how it will affect the PLAN naval buildup.


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"Ship prices, in nominal terms, are now at their highest level since 2009. Further increases are likely, as raw material and energy prices continue to climb.

Newbuilding prices vary across ship types, Clarkson noted, with container ships climbing most. A 15,500 teu vessel now costs close to 50% more than it did 15 months ago, at the beginning of 2021. Capesize bulkers are up by almost a third, MR tankers by 21%, and LNG carriers by some 18%.

The price of steel is one factor, with Chinese plate costing more than $800 a tonne, up by $250 over the last 24 months. "
Naval ships are typically smaller so I think the effect of steel prices will be less than in civilian ships

No idea about effects of labour cost and energy though
 

Overbom

Colonel
Registered Member
Prices are going up. I wonder how it will affect the PLAN naval buildup.


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"Ship prices, in nominal terms, are now at their highest level since 2009. Further increases are likely, as raw material and energy prices continue to climb.

Newbuilding prices vary across ship types, Clarkson noted, with container ships climbing most. A 15,500 teu vessel now costs close to 50% more than it did 15 months ago, at the beginning of 2021. Capesize bulkers are up by almost a third, MR tankers by 21%, and LNG carriers by some 18%.

The price of steel is one factor, with Chinese plate costing more than $800 a tonne, up by $250 over the last 24 months. "
This would also affect global shipbuilding though, right? As long as the comparative advantage against Western shipbuilding remains the same, then it is ok. I expect the PLAN to push for minimal price increases
 

ZeEa5KPul

Captain
Registered Member
Prices are going up. I wonder how it will affect the PLAN naval buildup.
They're going up in dollars because the dollar is undergoing a process the technical term for which, I believe, is "toilet paperization." RMB prices are less affected. In any event, the Chinese MIC are all SOEs so if the Chinese government needs them to keep a lid on any inflation in procurement costs, they will.
 

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