Chinese semiconductor industry


BoraTas

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As much as AI applications and servers do not need blazingly fast chips and may be supplied with China's own, without them China will lose market share to foreign brands as has happened to Huawei. Without them, she runs the risk of future sanctions from an insecure America. Then the technology can be applied elsewhere than smartphones. So let's not get smug and hope all should be well without top of the line chips.
Huawei lost market share because it doesn't have Google services and American-made apps anymore. In most countries American social media is the social media and there is no alternative to other American apps. A Huawei owner can't watch Netflix, accesses Youtube/Twitter/Instagram via the web, cannot download most apps without using APK, does a lot of things just to download Whatsapp, etc... This is the real dealbreaker. I don't even think most people even noticed the impact of the chip tech embargo.
SleepyStudent:
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USG trying to set up for decoupling. Need increased focus on subsystems, equipment and EDA

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Ha ha ha. For sure, no American tech was used in the DF-17. Americans are perpetual victims these days. BTW, software pirating is 50 year old support.
 
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quantumlight

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Huawei lost market share because it doesn't have Google services and American-made apps anymore. In most countries American social media is the social media and there is no alternative to other American apps. A Huawei owner can't watch Netflix, accesses Youtube/Twitter/Instagram via the web, cannot download most apps without using APK, does a lot of things just to download Whatsapp, etc... This is the real dealbreaker. I don't even think most people even noticed the impact of the chip tech embargo.


Ha ha ha. For sure, no American tech was used in the DF-17. Americans are perpetual victims these days.
One of the reasons Boris/UK reneged on the Huawei ban after stating they wouldn't ban Huawei but would cap it to no more than 35% marketshare etc was because Trump /US was able to force TW to compel TSMC to cut ties with Huawei... this changed the "security posture" of Huawei and esp Huawei 5G going forwards because even if SMIC/etc could pick up the slack in time and eventually catch up with TSMC, UK being one of the five eyes, it would have been unacceptable for them to go with Huawei when the chips were fabbed by China, in China... it was different when it was fabbed by a US friendly nation so that in time of war US can retain the option to cut China off and also US can plant their own hardware backdoors into Huawei hardware etc etc... basically when too many of the layers of the entire stack was not under Western control, it was deemed to be too risky.
 

quantumlight

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Ha ha ha. For sure, no American tech was used in the DF-17. Americans are perpetual victims these days. BTW, software pirating is 50 year old support.
Even if it was using off the shelf IC parts how many DF-17 does CHina need? its not like they are making millions of cars or graphcis cards or motherboards or smartphones for the mass consumer public... even if it was using off the shelf chips they would have stocked up enough for the rest of the 21st century
 

t2contra

Major
Huawei lost market share because it doesn't have Google services and American-made apps anymore. In most countries American social media is the social media and there is no alternative to other American apps. A Huawei owner can't watch Netflix, accesses Youtube/Twitter/Instagram via the web, cannot download most apps without using APK, does a lot of things just to download Whatsapp, etc... This is the real dealbreaker. I don't even think most people even noticed the impact of the chip tech embargo.


Ha ha ha. For sure, no American tech was used in the DF-17. Americans are perpetual victims these days. BTW, software pirating is 50 year old support.

Not just the Google ecosystem. It is the TSMC chips as well.
 

caudaceus

Junior Member
Registered Member
Huawei lost market share because it doesn't have Google services and American-made apps anymore. In most countries American social media is the social media and there is no alternative to other American apps. A Huawei owner can't watch Netflix, accesses Youtube/Twitter/Instagram via the web, cannot download most apps without using APK, does a lot of things just to download Whatsapp, etc... This is the real dealbreaker. I don't even think most people even noticed the impact of the chip tech embargo.


Ha ha ha. For sure, no American tech was used in the DF-17. Americans are perpetual victims these days. BTW, software pirating is 50 year old support.
From this and Republicans reactions to the MLB deal with China, it seems it doesn't want China to pay IP royalty anymore.
 

Tyler

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Huawei lost market share because it doesn't have Google services and American-made apps anymore. In most countries American social media is the social media and there is no alternative to other American apps. A Huawei owner can't watch Netflix, accesses Youtube/Twitter/Instagram via the web, cannot download most apps without using APK, does a lot of things just to download Whatsapp, etc... This is the real dealbreaker. I don't even think most people even noticed the impact of the chip tech embargo.


Ha ha ha. For sure, no American tech was used in the DF-17. Americans are perpetual victims these days. BTW, software pirating is 50 year old support.
Huawei's harmony OS will soon replace Google android worldwide.
 

Appix

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Biden administration slaps export controls on Chinese firms for aiding PLA weapons development​

The Biden administration on Thursday placed seven Chinese firms and government labs under U.S. export controls for their involvement in China’s effort to build supercomputers that help develop nuclear and other advanced military weapons.

All seven are linked to China’s ambition to build the world’s first exascale computer, Commerce Department officials said. An exascale computer — the next frontier in high- performance computing — can handle a million trillion calculations per second.

That’s the sort of speed necessary to more accurately model the heat and drag on hypersonic vehicles, a field of advanced weapons research in which the Chinese military is already engaged, using its current generation of supercomputers.

The move makes good on an effort begun under the Trump administration to add the entities to a Commerce Department trade blacklist known as the “Entity List.” The previous administration ran out of time, leaving the package up to its successor to approve.

The listing of the firms and labs means they may not use U.S.-origin technology without a Commerce Department license, which is very difficult to obtain.

“These are parties that are acting in ways that are contrary to our national security interests,” said a senior agency official, speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the matter’s sensitivity. “This is really about not having U.S. items contribute to China’s advancement of its military capabilities.”

Speaking broadly Wednesday about Biden administration trade policy toward China, Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo said, “What we do on offense is more important than what we do on defense.”

The designated entities include three semiconductor firms: Tianjin Phytium Information Technology (or Phytium), Shanghai High-Performance Integrated Circuit Design Center and Sunway Microelectronics.

The trio have links to the People’s Liberation Army. Phytium microprocessors have been used for the supercomputer at China’s largest aerodynamics research complex, which is conducting hypersonics weapons research.

The other four entities are the National Supercomputing Center Jinan, the National Supercomputing Center Shenzhen, the National Supercomputing Center Wuxi and the National Supercomputing Center Zhengzhou.

“These computers have plenty of legitimate civilian uses, but also are very important for weapons design, particularly advanced weapons design, nuclear weapons, cyber, missiles and even hypersonics,” the official said.

The Commerce Department began sanctioning entities linked to Chinese military high-performance computing in 2015 under the Obama administration. That year, for example, it placed the National University of Defense Technology and the National Supercomputing Center in Tianjin — both PLA institutions — on the Entity List. Both are closely linked to Phytium, which on Wednesday
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Feiteng Information Technology Co., Ltd.

Phytium uses American software design companies, which will now have to obtain a license to continue to do business with the Chinese chipmaker.

A decade ago, before the blacklisting, the Tianjin supercomputing lab used chips from Silicon Valley-based Intel in its supercomputer, the Tianhe 1. After the lab was placed under U.S. sanctions, the California chip giant could no longer provide it technology, so the lab turned to Phytium, according to Western analysts.

In 2019, the Commerce Department listed a second set of Chinese companies and labs for involvement with the military’s effort to develop an exascale supercomputer.

Because many advanced chips can be used for commercial as well as military purposes, they are perfectly suited to the Chinese Communist Party’s strategy of “military-civil” fusion, which uses civilian firms to produce or acquire goods and technologies for the PLA.

Shanghai High Performance and some of the sanctioned supercomputing centers support the PLA’s 56th Research Institute, which handles code breaking for communications intercepts, said a second senior Commerce Department official.

“All of this is a way to say that these companies have national standards for supporting the military,” the Commerce official said.

The official said the Commerce Department seeks to make its export controls more effective by conferring with allies to see what actions they might take “because many of them have similar concerns” about China. Taiwan, for instance, is a key player in the global semiconductor supply chain, and the world’s most advanced chip foundry is located there.

In a briefing Wednesday before the Commerce announcement, Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu said that Taipei would work with the United States to monitor its chip suppliers.

Taipei wants to “make sure that Taiwan’s semiconductor supply to China is in line with the U.S.’s broader strategic objectives,” he said. “The Taiwanese government has been working very closely with the United States on the kinds of norms that we need to follow to make sure the supply chain is beneficial not just to Taiwan but the broader international community, especially like-minded countries.”

To compete in the long run with China, Raimondo said Wednesday, “we have to work with our allies and find common ground where we can.”

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voyager1

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Phytium uses American software design companies, which will now have to obtain a license to continue to do business with the Chinese chipmaker.
Good. Deserved to be sanctioned. I wish the US sanctions similar companies doing the same thing.

If after all these years you still use US IP then you deserve to lose your business and to be sanctioned all the way back to the Stone Age
 

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