Chinese Engine Development


Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
Just the usual “we must meet deadlines because of Xi Jinping thoughts blah blah blah” garbage. Typical bags with no useful info other than that CJ1000 will meet a deadline this year.
Do foreign component suppliers need to be wary of Xi Jingpings mandates? I thought cj1000 would be in temporary cold storage after AECC getting into the prestigious sanctions list.

How do they meet the deadlines despite the sanctions and barriers?
 
D

Deleted member 15949

Guest
F-135 is an F-119 with a much bigger fan to achieve a substantially higher thrust and higher subsonic fuel efficiency through a much higher bypass ratio, plus provision to drive an additional external fan via a clutch through the front of the engine.
More advanced in every way?
 
D

Deleted member 15949

Guest
Do foreign component suppliers need to be wary of Xi Jingpings mandates? I thought cj1000 would be in temporary cold storage after AECC getting into the prestigious sanctions list.

How do they meet the deadlines despite the sanctions and barriers?
AECC isn't banned from importing foreign products*

*ish
 

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
AECC isn't banned from importing foreign products*

*ish
But could be. Foreign suppliers need to obtain licenses, it seems. So the CJ1000 seems more like a technology demo endeavor rather than a reliable engine which can be upgraded and serviced long term.

Things would be more bright if China initiated a program to replace the component supplier with Chinese or Russian ones. Anyway...
 
D

Deleted member 15949

Guest
But could be. Foreign suppliers need to obtain licenses, it seems. So the CJ1000 seems more like a technology demo endeavor rather than a reliable engine which can be upgraded and serviced long term.

Things would be more bright if China initiated a program to replace the component supplier with Chinese or Russian ones. Anyway...
Requiring licenses for engine intermediaries isn't an AECC specific sanction though if you deal with that political uncertainty anyway, would surprise me significantly if they weren't already working on replacing it
 

Xsizor

Captain
Registered Member
Requiring licenses for engine intermediaries isn't an AECC specific sanction though if you deal with that political uncertainty anyway, would surprise me significantly if they weren't already working on replacing it
Considering CJ1000 was the product of a different international political climate, yes, political uncertainty will affect the product.

They ought to have initiated working parallel on a replacement. If they didn't, they would be now. Anyway, the reveal next year certainly wouldn't include these replacements. But it'll verify the engine core and other Chinese components.
 

latenlazy

Brigadier
But could be. Foreign suppliers need to obtain licenses, it seems. So the CJ1000 seems more like a technology demo endeavor rather than a reliable engine which can be upgraded and serviced long term.

Things would be more bright if China initiated a program to replace the component supplier with Chinese or Russian ones. Anyway...
I imagine most parts that use foreign suppliers are easily substitutable and not a meaningful point of leverage for sanction targets. With engines most of the components that would be vulnerable to sanctions are probably already blocked via tech exports.
 
D

Deleted member 15949

Guest
I imagine most parts that use foreign suppliers are easily substitutable and not a meaningful point of leverage for sanction targets. With engines most of the components that would be vulnerable to sanctions are probably already blocked via tech exports.
The export control regime is that any component specifically designed for aircraft engines is controlled and requires a license to ship so back in the more amicable times, they probably weren't blocked. I don't know the mechanics of what is shipped and what hasn't though
 

taxiya

Brigadier
Registered Member
Regarding the impact of sanction on CJ1000. I think,
  1. Most of foreign supplied components have their domestic counterparts being developed in parallel.
  2. Majority of these foreign components are from Europe. Not that easy for US to block.
  3. CJ1000 is still in prototype testing. There are 3 test engines built already. Hopefully all components for test engines are already shipped.
I think the message is talking about some test milestone that is to be met by the end of the year. We know there are couple of tests ongoing. These test articles are already built.

The sanction would have real impact on serial production if:
  1. By the time of certification, domestic components are not ready.
  2. US is able to strong-arm Europeans to impose sanctions on China, or US can extend their sanction to include European components because of a US made screw.
These would be something to see in the next 2 years, but for now I don't think it will slow down the development.
 

latenlazy

Brigadier
Regarding the impact of sanction on CJ1000. I think,
  1. Most of foreign supplied components have their domestic counterparts being developed in parallel.
  2. Majority of these foreign components are from Europe. Not that easy for US to block.
  3. CJ1000 is still in prototype testing. There are 3 test engines built already. Hopefully all components for test engines are already shipped.
I think the message is talking about some test milestone that is to be met by the end of the year. We know there are couple of tests ongoing. These test articles are already built.

The sanction would have real impact on serial production if:
  1. By the time of certification, domestic components are not ready.
  2. US is able to strong-arm Europeans to impose sanctions on China, or US can extend their sanction to include European components because of a US made screw.
These would be something to see in the next 2 years, but for now I don't think it will slow down the development.
And after the wave of bans in 2019 there’s no way they aren’t already working on supply chain hardening for the parts that have narrow range of substitutes.
 

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