China's Defense/Military Breaking News Thread


Hendrik_2000

Brigadier
Or it could be a f16 or f15 or f18... Unless the Venezuelan air force send a plane over to visually check out, which is not likely, can't know for sure it's a f22.
Because if it show on standard radar then it will be f16, f15, f18 But if it didn't show on standard radar but did show on JY27 radar then it must be F22
I am pretty sure the Venezuelan has other radar beside JY27
 

Hendrik_2000

Brigadier
Defense budget still growing at 179 billion US dollar albeit at slower rate but considering covid 19, 6.6% is as good as you can get
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China slows defense budget growth to 6.6 % in 2020
By Liu Xuanzun Source:Global Times Published: 2020/5/22 9:56:42 Last Updated: 2020/5/22 12:00:36
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Inforgraphic: GT

China set its 2020 defense budget growth target at 6.6 percent, resulting in a draft budget of 1.268 trillion yuan ($178.2 billion), lower than the 7.5 percent growth in 2019.

The figure was made public on Friday in a draft budget report to be submitted to the annual session of the National People's Congress (NPC).

This also marks the lowest defense budget growth rate in recent years.

This means China can provide sufficient funding for military development despite the economic impact brought by the COVID-19 outbreak, and while the growth has slowed down, it matches China's current economic situation in the wake of COVID-19, analysts said on Friday.

China's defense budget for 2019 was 1.19 trillion yuan, up 7.5 percent from 2018. China has maintained single-digit growth in its annual defense budget since 2016.

Song Zhongping, a Chinese military expert and TV commentator, told the Global Times on Friday that it is very normal that compared to last year's 7.5 percent growth rate, this year's 6.6 percent is not a significant slowdown considering the effect brought by the pandemic.

China is facing national security threats, including those taking place very nearby to China and in non-traditional security fields. Compared to these threats, China's military expenditure was far from enough, Song said.

China is in need of moderate military budget growths to support its national defense, without which China's economic achievements could be lost, Song said.

Wei Dongxu, a Beijing-based military analyst, told the Global Times on Friday that the increased defense budget can ensure the Chinese military's major programs and key spending fields are not affected by the pandemic and will remain on schedule.

While the growth rate declined, which may prompt the Chinese military to make some choices in allocating expenditure, China's overall national defense construction and the development of the military will not see a major impact, as enough funding is still available to key areas such as the development of new weapons and equipment, troops' salaries and benefits and training expenses, Wei said.

The decreased growth rate is partially decided by China's actual situation, and the pandemic has had an impact on economic growth in all countries, Wei noted.

Reasonable growth

China has scrapped a numerical economic growth target this year for the first time in decades.

China has kept its military expenditure/GDP ratio to under 2 percent in the past three decades, while other major countries like the US have been keeping this ratio to 3 to 4 percent in recent years.

With China's economic volume growing, corresponding military strength is needed to protect it. Back when China's economy skyrocketed at the beginning of reform and opening-up, military expenditure growth remained slow. Increasing the defense budget is only making up for what was lost back then, analysts pointed out.

Song said the defense budget growth rate of 6.6 percent for 2020 is not a high figure at all even under the COVID-19 pandemic.

China's defense expenditure is categorized by application, namely personnel expenses, training maintenance fees and equipment spending, according to China's
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.

The Chinese military needs to procure a huge amount of expensive, advanced weapons and equipment to replace its vast arsenal of outdated ones; it is also boosting the intensity and extent of training; as the CPI increases, benefits of soldiers and officers also need to improve, Song pointed out.

The 6.6 percent growth rate of this year alone cannot solve China's problem of the lack of military funding, but it is a process of gradual improvement, Song said, noting that if next year's economic situation can be better, the military budget growth rate for next year should be higher.

The continued growth in the Chinese military budget comes at a time when the US is becoming increasingly aggressive and has conducted repeated military provocations against China in regions like the South China Sea and the Taiwan Straits.

Both regions have become flashpoints, which military observers say face the risk of escalating into actual military conflicts. The US has been sending warships and warplanes to waters and airspace near China more frequently, with some trespassing into Chinese territories. China has also been conducting patrols and exercises to safeguard its national sovereignty and territorial integrity.

China has huge national defense demands, which is a crucial factor in the military budget, a Chinese military expert who asked not to be named told the Global Times on Friday.

In the post-pandemic period, China faces more military threats from other countries, mainly the US. With Taiwan secessionists becoming more and more rampant, reunification by force with the island of Taiwan is always on the table, the expert said, noting that in this situation, increasing the defense budget must not stop.

China takes the development of the economy and the demands of national defense into consideration when deciding on the appropriate scale and composition of defense expenditure, according to the national defense white paper issued by the State Council Information Office in July 2019.

The 2020 defense budget should be seen as reasonable and appropriate, analysts said.
 

Inst

Senior Member
Defense budget still growing at 179 billion US dollar albeit at slower rate but considering covid 19, 6.6% is as good as you can get
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China slows defense budget growth to 6.6 % in 2020
By Liu Xuanzun Source:Global Times Published: 2020/5/22 9:56:42 Last Updated: 2020/5/22 12:00:36
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!




Inforgraphic: GT

China set its 2020 defense budget growth target at 6.6 percent, resulting in a draft budget of 1.268 trillion yuan ($178.2 billion), lower than the 7.5 percent growth in 2019.

The figure was made public on Friday in a draft budget report to be submitted to the annual session of the National People's Congress (NPC).

This also marks the lowest defense budget growth rate in recent years.

This means China can provide sufficient funding for military development despite the economic impact brought by the COVID-19 outbreak, and while the growth has slowed down, it matches China's current economic situation in the wake of COVID-19, analysts said on Friday.

China's defense budget for 2019 was 1.19 trillion yuan, up 7.5 percent from 2018. China has maintained single-digit growth in its annual defense budget since 2016.

Song Zhongping, a Chinese military expert and TV commentator, told the Global Times on Friday that it is very normal that compared to last year's 7.5 percent growth rate, this year's 6.6 percent is not a significant slowdown considering the effect brought by the pandemic.

China is facing national security threats, including those taking place very nearby to China and in non-traditional security fields. Compared to these threats, China's military expenditure was far from enough, Song said.

China is in need of moderate military budget growths to support its national defense, without which China's economic achievements could be lost, Song said.

Wei Dongxu, a Beijing-based military analyst, told the Global Times on Friday that the increased defense budget can ensure the Chinese military's major programs and key spending fields are not affected by the pandemic and will remain on schedule.

While the growth rate declined, which may prompt the Chinese military to make some choices in allocating expenditure, China's overall national defense construction and the development of the military will not see a major impact, as enough funding is still available to key areas such as the development of new weapons and equipment, troops' salaries and benefits and training expenses, Wei said.

The decreased growth rate is partially decided by China's actual situation, and the pandemic has had an impact on economic growth in all countries, Wei noted.

Reasonable growth

China has scrapped a numerical economic growth target this year for the first time in decades.

China has kept its military expenditure/GDP ratio to under 2 percent in the past three decades, while other major countries like the US have been keeping this ratio to 3 to 4 percent in recent years.

With China's economic volume growing, corresponding military strength is needed to protect it. Back when China's economy skyrocketed at the beginning of reform and opening-up, military expenditure growth remained slow. Increasing the defense budget is only making up for what was lost back then, analysts pointed out.

Song said the defense budget growth rate of 6.6 percent for 2020 is not a high figure at all even under the COVID-19 pandemic.

China's defense expenditure is categorized by application, namely personnel expenses, training maintenance fees and equipment spending, according to China's
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
.

The Chinese military needs to procure a huge amount of expensive, advanced weapons and equipment to replace its vast arsenal of outdated ones; it is also boosting the intensity and extent of training; as the CPI increases, benefits of soldiers and officers also need to improve, Song pointed out.

The 6.6 percent growth rate of this year alone cannot solve China's problem of the lack of military funding, but it is a process of gradual improvement, Song said, noting that if next year's economic situation can be better, the military budget growth rate for next year should be higher.

The continued growth in the Chinese military budget comes at a time when the US is becoming increasingly aggressive and has conducted repeated military provocations against China in regions like the South China Sea and the Taiwan Straits.

Both regions have become flashpoints, which military observers say face the risk of escalating into actual military conflicts. The US has been sending warships and warplanes to waters and airspace near China more frequently, with some trespassing into Chinese territories. China has also been conducting patrols and exercises to safeguard its national sovereignty and territorial integrity.

China has huge national defense demands, which is a crucial factor in the military budget, a Chinese military expert who asked not to be named told the Global Times on Friday.

In the post-pandemic period, China faces more military threats from other countries, mainly the US. With Taiwan secessionists becoming more and more rampant, reunification by force with the island of Taiwan is always on the table, the expert said, noting that in this situation, increasing the defense budget must not stop.

China takes the development of the economy and the demands of national defense into consideration when deciding on the appropriate scale and composition of defense expenditure, according to the national defense white paper issued by the State Council Information Office in July 2019.

The 2020 defense budget should be seen as reasonable and appropriate, analysts said.

The way the budget was covered internationally was that much of China's government spending was cut, but the defense budget was retained.

So defense allocations as a proportion of total government spending in China definitely increased.

This is a big break with previous Chinese policy, as Chinese defense spending increases, when adjusted both for GDP growth and GDP deflator growth tended to keep Chinese defense spending at 2% of GDP.
 

Lethe

Senior Member
dafug is this....railgun lauched missile ??!!

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I can't read this, but my understanding is that one of the major challenges for railgun applications is designing even guidance systems -- let alone propulsion systems -- that can survive the tremendous acceleration imparted to the projectile at launch. If China has made progress in this area, it would be a considerable step towards a practical weapon.
 

taxiya

Colonel
Registered Member
dafug is this....railgun lauched missile ??!!

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The article states that it launches the rocket to certain altitude before the rocket motor starts. It also states that its main purpose is to reduce the energy "waste" while accelerating the rocket from speed 0 and altitude 0.

From these words, I am sure that the launching mechanism is the same as Catapult/Meglev using electromagnetic coils for relatively low acceleration, instead of a railgun type whose G-force will destroy anything but a solid block.

The main advantage that I can think of this application is the higher energy density of diesel fuel (to electricity to em launching) being 3 to 4 times of the solid rocket propellant. Taking into consideration of efficiency (diesel to electricity being 40-50%, then electricity to launching motor 90%) 45%, we have about 2 times of the energy density of solid rocket fuel. That can be translated to double rocket/firepower per unit. There may be other benefit that I am not aware of.
 
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Phoenix_Rising

Junior Member
AHhhh, academican Ma Weiming, not surprising at all.
He is in charge of some insane projects, a magnet-accelerated
dafug is this....railgun lauched missile ??!!

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Well, that's Ma Weiming, you know, the most talented man on EMALS in China, probably on this planet.
If something has a slightest in-theory possibility to be done by an EMALS, he can make it happen.
 

Josh Luo

Senior Member
Registered Member
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Is it true that Russia suspended S-400 deliveries to China due to espionage, Russian fear of reverse-engineering, and Sino-Indian conflict? I don't trust the Indian source ANI, but it seems like the original source came from NetEast and Sohu.
 

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