China - Pakistan Economic Corridor - CPEC


But somebody has to provide for the blast, detonation and intelligence to the terrorist group about the upcoming bus that was targeted.
it might be just any bus coming, plus in that country there'd be millions of volunteers around with their "gear"

I think we have to wait and see if there's yet another attack against Chinese personnel/assets soon, then yeah (I don't tend to believe in coincidences)
 

timepass

Brigadier
oh there're so many Tangos in Pakistan that they might now even know who's the target ... somebody wanted to blast her/himself, so s/he did

just another day in Pakistan, I guess

it might be just any bus coming, plus in that country there'd be millions of volunteers around with their "gear"

I think we have to wait and see if there's yet another attack against Chinese personnel/assets soon, then yeah (I don't tend to believe in coincidences)

Come on, how on Earth someone can give such sweeping statements when they never ever visited the country & basing their senseless statements purely on biased media reporting & CIA/RAW reports.....

I don't have to say anything further....
 

Orthan

Junior Member
According to this reuters article, a pakistani official made critical comments about CPEC. Later, he said that his statements were misconstrued.

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But what do you think of this? taking into account what already happened in malaysia, is it possible that somewhere in the future, pakistan could renegociate or even cancel the CPEC, or at least parts of it? And what about the broader relationship betwen the 2 countries?
 

taxiya

Colonel
Registered Member
According to this reuters article, a pakistani official made critical comments about CPEC. Later, he said that his statements were misconstrued.

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But what do you think of this? taking into account what already happened in malaysia, is it possible that somewhere in the future, pakistan could renegociate or even cancel the CPEC, or at least parts of it? And what about the broader relationship betwen the 2 countries?
At the end of that article
Pakistan is struggling to avert a foreign currency crisis that could force it to seek a bailout from the International Monetary Fund. Its foreign currency reserves have dwindled to $9.9 billion last month from around $16 billion in mid-2017.

The rupee has been devalued four times since late last year, falling by more than 20 percent.

In June, Beijing gave Pakistan $1 billion in loans to boost foreign reserves ahead of the July 25 election.

You get everything about what it is about. IMF is the US tool. Pakistan's current problem is no different from other emerging markets like Turkey and India etc. who is suffering the surge of USD going up depleting their foreign exchange reserve.

Two options, go to IMF for support which means surrender to the pressure of US, remember the continuous criticism from US to Pakistan, or Turkey? The other option is stick to China and Russia. Besides IMF, ADB has the cash to support Pakistan.

It is all geopolitics, NOT about budget or debt. One does not need to cancel the project to lessen the burden, just adjust the speed to cope with the change, that means delay.

Last but not the least, every country has some people who is always dragging their feet to sabotage their own country to serve the interest of their foreign pay master. China has it, no surprise that Pakistan has that too. But they will fail in the long run, after all everybody need powerplant and road to boost economy which will increase the wealth not reducing it.

We will wait and see.
 
hi, you might recall
Aug 12, 2018
But somebody has to provide for the blast, detonation and intelligence to the terrorist group about the upcoming bus that was targeted.
now
China confirms, condemns attack on consulate in Pakistan's Karachi
Xinhua| 2018-11-23 17:48:07
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The Chinese Embassy in Pakistan confirmed on Friday an attack against the Chinese Consulate-General in Karachi in south Pakistan, and strongly condemned the terrorist attack, adding that all Chinese nationals in the diplomatic compound are safe.

The embassy also expressed the condolence to the two policemen killed during the attack, according to a statement from the embassy.

Police and security forces said they have completed the operation in the site, where also several foreign missions are located in.

All three terrorists involved in the attack were killed, according the Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR), the media wing of Pakistan army.

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan has condemned the attack and ordered a complete inquiry into the incident and has desired that elements behind the incident must be unearthed.

Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi condemned the attack and said police and security forces responded promptly and eliminated all the militants involved in the attack.

At least seven people, including two policemen, two civilians and three terrorists, were killed in the attack, police said.

Javed Alam, deputy inspector general of police of karachi south region, said that three terrorists armed with automatic guns, hand grenades, suicide jackets and explosive devices reached the area in a white colored vehicle and opened fire at the police personnel deployed for security in the Chinese diplomatic compound in the Clifton area of Karachi.

The heavily-guarded area is considered a red zone, and it is home to a number of upscale restaurants and schools.

Director of the Jinnah Hospital Karachi Seemi Jamali told media that overall five bodies and one injured have been shifted to the hospital so far.

Soon after the attack, police and security forces rushed to the site and cordoned off the area and launched an operation against the terrorists. All roads leading to the diplomatic area were blocked for public and media.

Following the gunshots and blasts of hand grenades, heavy smoke was rising from the site.

According to the reports, the terrorists also torched three vehicles present at the site.

An eyewitness said that three terrorists reached the area and started firing and also hurled hand grenades at the police personnel.

Police, security forces and the bomb disposal squad have cleared the area after search operation and diffusing the explosive devices planted by the terrorists, police said.

A heavy cache of explosive material, weapons, bullets, dry fruits, first aid medicines and some electronic gadgets were also recovered from the possessions of the militants.

An outlawed militant organization, the Balochistan Liberation Army, has claimed the attack. However, there is no official confirmation about the claim yet.
 

gelgoog

Captain
Registered Member
I think some of the Chinese investments in infrastructure in Pakistan don't make financial or political sense to me. But to a large degree I would say most of the investments do make sense. I only fear that some of the projects may be too large in scope though. It is fine to grow the transport and energy infrastructure, but without the industrial zones and fabric to produce products and employ people to pay these investments how can they be maintained in the long run? I know that Chinese economic investment zones are also planned but we see little news of those compared to the mega construction projects and that does worry me. To a degree I think China has been a responsible partner in that they either take up the financial burden for the project they sponsored or alleviate the payback reducing rates or increasing the length of time to pay back the loans. For example the Sri Lankan port case is often bandied to say China is an economic predator. However if you examine it more closely, the project was done under the initiative of the then Sri Lankan ruler who wanted a major harbor in his region of origin. This was a vanity project. It was done on the other side of the island, far away from the major population centers, like in the middle of nowhere. The port was both too large for the country solely and the infrastructure to connect the port to the rest of the country was not developed in time. So it is little surprise it was a failure. What people do not mention is that at the same time China upgraded their existing main port and that operation has been financially successful. The failure vanity project was taken over by China with a 99 year lease. Which I do consider excessive, but between that and having no second port in Sri Lanka, which is better really? It ended up costing

I think the Ethiopian railway system project was much more of a failure because there was poor planning with regards to the infrastructure surrounding the line which were required to make it profitable and viable in the first place. Then the northern rail extension was more of a political nature and had limited financial prospects. This lead to its economic failure. But you can attribute that to lack of economic planning by the Ethiopian state itself. I think China needs to better support these countries with top level economic advisors and consider the local conditions better in projects going further to ensure increased profitability and success. A lot of these countries lack the expertise to make informed decisions in such matters. In China, for example, it is likely the local governments would have taken the initiative to build the surrounding infrastructure but in places like those, they simply either do not have the budget or lack the know-how in how to do that properly.

To also tackle these issues I think the Chinese should enact similar programs to what the Soviets used to do back then i.e. finance scholarships to train technical personnel born in African countries at Chinese technical and economic schools in order to improve contact between Chinese engineers and economic planners and those countries.

The IMF is a tool of the US government to promote globalization to a degree even the USA does not allow inside its own borders. They basically force countries to dismantle their social industries and increase the social costs of base products in exchange for money. This pushes down those countries into a consistent position of economic vassalage to them. No industry is allowed to fully develop.
 

timepass

Brigadier
I think some of the Chinese investments in infrastructure in Pakistan don't make financial or political sense to me. But to a large degree I would say most of the investments do make sense. I only fear that some of the projects may be too large in scope though. It is fine to grow the transport and energy infrastructure, but without the industrial zones and fabric to produce products and employ people to pay these investments how can they be maintained in the long run? I know that Chinese economic investment zones are also planned but we see little news of those compared to the mega construction projects and that does worry me. To a degree I think China has been a responsible partner in that they either take up the financial burden for the project they sponsored or alleviate the payback reducing rates or increasing the length of time to pay back the loans. For example the Sri Lankan port case is often bandied to say China is an economic predator. However if you examine it more closely, the project was done under the initiative of the then Sri Lankan ruler who wanted a major harbor in his region of origin. This was a vanity project. It was done on the other side of the island, far away from the major population centers, like in the middle of nowhere. The port was both too large for the country solely and the infrastructure to connect the port to the rest of the country was not developed in time. So it is little surprise it was a failure. What people do not mention is that at the same time China upgraded their existing main port and that operation has been financially successful. The failure vanity project was taken over by China with a 99 year lease. Which I do consider excessive, but between that and having no second port in Sri Lanka, which is better really? It ended up costing

I think the Ethiopian railway system project was much more of a failure because there was poor planning with regards to the infrastructure surrounding the line which were required to make it profitable and viable in the first place. Then the northern rail extension was more of a political nature and had limited financial prospects. This lead to its economic failure. But you can attribute that to lack of economic planning by the Ethiopian state itself. I think China needs to better support these countries with top level economic advisors and consider the local conditions better in projects going further to ensure increased profitability and success. A lot of these countries lack the expertise to make informed decisions in such matters. In China, for example, it is likely the local governments would have taken the initiative to build the surrounding infrastructure but in places like those, they simply either do not have the budget or lack the know-how in how to do that properly.

To also tackle these issues I think the Chinese should enact similar programs to what the Soviets used to do back then i.e. finance scholarships to train technical personnel born in African countries at Chinese technical and economic schools in order to improve contact between Chinese engineers and economic planners and those countries.

The IMF is a tool of the US government to promote globalization to a degree even the USA does not allow inside its own borders. They basically force countries to dismantle their social industries and increase the social costs of base products in exchange for money. This pushes down those countries into a consistent position of economic vassalage to them. No industry is allowed to fully develop.

As I commented (#1023) above to a senseless post, I again strongly (I repeat ... strongly) don't asses the situation or base your judgments based on biased media (either US/EU or influenced local media) reports while sitting 1000s of miles away from the action theater (which I feel is the norm on this forum since I joined SDF a decade ago).

The attack was a try to sabotage CPEC with a foreign back agenda, we (Pakistan/Chinese people) all know this well, if you wana see the impact of CPEC in the region then come by yourself & experienced it on the ground.

Further, I mentioned several times on this very thread that the investment which is now touching $100bn mark is on mutual public/private partnership with build & run concept. Only $7bn are in soft loan for Road & Infrastructure.
 

AndrewS

Major
Registered Member
As I commented (#1023) above to a senseless post, I again strongly (I repeat ... strongly) don't asses the situation or base your judgments based on biased media (either US/EU or influenced local media) reports while sitting 1000s of miles away from the action theater (which I feel is the norm on this forum since I joined SDF a decade ago).

The attack was a try to sabotage CPEC with a foreign back agenda, we (Pakistan/Chinese people) all know this well, if you wana see the impact of CPEC in the region then come by yourself & experienced it on the ground.

Further, I mentioned several times on this very thread that the investment which is now touching $100bn mark is on mutual public/private partnership with build & run concept. Only $7bn are in soft loan for Road & Infrastructure.

Are there still chronic power shortages across cities in Pakistan?
 

timepass

Brigadier
Are there still chronic power shortages across cities in Pakistan?

Its improved drastically since the inception of CPEC, though not all power projects are under CPEC...

Currently managing the demand which is around +2.5k & there are several projects in the pipeline or near to competition & in next 5-7 years there will be no shortage, in fact will be surplus.
 

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