China Coast Guard and Patrol vessels


Temstar

Colonel
Registered Member
Haixun 09's bow reminds me of 055, is there any significance to that shape?

How come Maritime Safety Administration need such a massive ship? As I understand it, if CCG is like your People's Armed Police than MSA is your local traffic cop. CCG I can understand 10k+ ships but I thought MSA doesn't get into playing chicken with anyone?
 

Blitzo

Lieutenant General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Registered Member
Haixun 09's bow reminds me of 055, is there any significance to that shape?

I don't think the bow is reminiscent of 055's at all, it's a fairly generic flared bow.
It's' certainly not an enclosed bow like 055.


How come Maritime Safety Administration need such a massive ship? As I understand it, if CCG is like your People's Armed Police than MSA is your local traffic cop. CCG I can understand 10k+ ships but I thought MSA doesn't get into playing chicken with anyone?

Depends on the region... there would be situations where the greater size may be needed. One can easily imagine where enforcement of maritime safety and shipping safety and maritime accidents could come up with oppositional ships of other nations, but likely would operate alongside the CCG in those situations as well.
 

para80

Junior Member
Registered Member
Larger hulls means better accommodation, more space for helos, fuel, stores, equipment etc. I won't deny that there may be an element of prestige thinking also for selecting a larger (especially "largest yet" etc) design for a particular service, but given the distances these hulls potentially travel and where they are expected to remain on station for a while, such as all the disputed areas in SCS, I don't think 10k tons is a massive overshot. Anything between 5k and 10k tons is probably the new normal in coast guard OPVs, echoing the size growth for naval hulls for many of the same reasons. Steel is cheap.
 

Tam

Brigadier
Registered Member
Larger hulls means better accommodation, more space for helos, fuel, stores, equipment etc. I won't deny that there may be an element of prestige thinking also for selecting a larger (especially "largest yet" etc) design for a particular service, but given the distances these hulls potentially travel and where they are expected to remain on station for a while, such as all the disputed areas in SCS, I don't think 10k tons is a massive overshot. Anything between 5k and 10k tons is probably the new normal in coast guard OPVs, echoing the size growth for naval hulls for many of the same reasons. Steel is cheap.

The Japanese has some large coast guard ships so China made even larger.
 

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