Australian Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


kwaigonegin

Colonel
These Aussie Growlers as well as the F15SAs are currently built in my town.
I met with these test pilots testing out the F15SAs and the F18Fs for deliveries.




His unit was one of the very first wave who went downtown during Odyssey Dawn.
 

SouthernSky

Junior Member
Fifty years of service to the RAAF of the venerable C-130.

RAAF Base Richmond hosted a reunion on 26 August 2016 for the No 37 Squadron (37SQN) Association, celebrating that unit's 50th anniversary of operating the C-130 Hercules transport aircraft. In August 1966, 37SQN became the RAAF's second squadron to operate the Hercules, and since November 2006 has been the RAAF's sole operational squadron for the Hercules. The reunion was an opportunity for past members of the 37SQN workforce to see the current generation C-130J aircraft and Full-Flight Mission Simulator, as well as speak with their present-day counterparts.
 

Jeff Head

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JMSDF-RAN-00.jpg

Pacific Sentinel said:
The Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Marise Payne, today (25 August) met with her newly appointed Japanese counterpart, Ms Tomomi Inada, Minister of Defense.

During their meeting, the Ministers affirmed the mutual significance of the Australia-Japan defence relationship. Ministers outlined their respective policy priorities for bilateral defence engagement, including measures to enhance cooperation and engagement between the Japan Self-Defense Forces and the Australian Defence Force.

Ministers also discussed regional security challenges and expressed concerns over maritime disputes in the South China Sea. Both Ministers expressed strong opposition to any coercive unilateral actions that could alter the status quo and increase tensions, and urged all states to refrain from large-scale land reclamation, the construction of outposts and the use of those outposts for military purposes. The Ministers also encouraged all parties to resolve disputes in accordance with international law and called on China and the Philippines to abide by the Arbitral Tribunal’s Award of 12 July 2016 in the Philippines-China arbitration, which is final and legally binding. The Ministers expressed their opposition to coercive unilateral actions in the East China Sea that could alter the status quo and increase tensions.

The Ministers strongly condemned North Korea’s nuclear test in January 2016 and its subsequent ballistic missile launches, which were conducted in violation of multiple UN Security Council resolutions.
The Ministers committed to work together to explore new opportunities to strengthen bilateral defence cooperation, and emphasised the regional importance of trilateral defence and security cooperation with the United States.

“Australia and Japan are close defence and security partners,” Minister Payne said.
“I was pleased to visit Japan to meet Minister Inada, and confirm the importance of our bilateral defence relationship. I look forward to working with Minister Inada to further broaden and deepen our strong defence partnership.”

During her visit to Japan, Minister Payne also met with a number of Japanese Parliamentarians including Chief Cabinet Secretary, Yoshihide Suga, a key member of Prime Minister Abe’s Cabinet. At these meetings, the Minister praised the strength of Australia-Japan defence cooperation and welcomed the release of Japan’s 2016 Defence White Paper on 2 August 2016.

Minister Payne said she looked forward to visiting Japan again soon for the annual 2+2 Meeting of Foreign and Defence Ministers.
More photos from this years Joint RAN-JMSDF-US exercises

JMSDF-RAN-01.jpg

JMSDF-RAN-02.jpg

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SouthernSky

Junior Member
Australia warns French submarine maker after massive security leak.

A senior Australian defense official asked French shipbuilder Direction des Constructions Navales Services (DCNS) to step up security after the leak of documents detailing the top-secret combat capabilities of the Indian Navy’s Scorpene-class (Kalvari-class) diesel-electric attack submarine (See:
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).

The defense official, acting on behalf of Australia’s Defense Industry Minister Christopher Pyne, also conveyed the government’s deep concern over the implications of the leaks for the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN) so-called
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,
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to Reuters.

DCNS is engaged in exclusive negotiations over the construction of 12
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subs, a diesel-electric derivative of DCNS’ Barracuda-class nuclear attack submarine, for the RAN. Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced in April that DCNS has won the competitive evaluation process for the design and construction of the RAN’s next-generation submarines. The estimated cost for Australia’s new fleet of submarines is A$50 billion ($38.13 billion)—the country’s largest defense deal in history.
The leak comes at a critical time when Australia and France are working on the details of the deal including construction schedules and technology transfer agreements. DCNS said earlier in the week that the leak could have been executed by one of the two frustrated competitors in the bid, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI)/ Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation (KSC), and the German company ThyssenKrupp AG (TKMS).

DCNS accused its competitors of economic warfare. “Clearly there’s been a massive leak. And for the French to seek to blame either the Japanese or the Germans under some banner of ‘economic warfare’ is hysterical,” a senior industry source told Reuters.

The Australian Department of Defense also told DCNS that it expects the same level of security as U.S. defense contractors are providing for information on Australia’s submarines given that the RAN’s Collins-class subs are fitted with a U.S.-made combat system.

DCNS Australia
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on August 26 that it will establish an operational Security Committee by the end of 2016. “This committee is part of the arrangements that deliver sovereignty to Australia in submarine matters and will govern the measures that DCNS develops to deliver the Australian Government’s stringent security requirements for the Future Submarine Program,” said Sean Costello, chief executive officer, DCNS Australia.

DCNS has been assembling India’s new class of attack submarines in cooperation with the state-run Mazgaon Docks Limited (MDL) in Mumbai for the past decade. “The 22,400 pages leak includes highly classified documents marked ‘Restricted Scorpene India’ outlining the Scorpene-class sub’s diving depths, range, and endurance, magnetic, electromagnetic and infrared data, and details of the submarine’s combat system, including the torpedo launch system,” I
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elsewhere.
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oops (to me, the most amusing: "The cost per flight hour in June 2016 was A$30,335, compared with a target of A$20,000." ... even better is what the manufacturer says: "It believes that the report fails to “appreciate the significant improvements which have been made in the past two years nor the positive trend of all support key performance indicators.” LOL but I missed a promise how "ultimately" the system will be perfected)
Australian government auditor slams Tiger attack helicopter
The Australia National Audit Office (ANAO) has issued a report that is highly critical of the army’s fleet of 22 Airbus Helicopters Tiger Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter (ARH).

The 64-page report details a range of issues. It identifies 76 “capability deficiencies,” of which the Department of Defence (DoD) deems 60 to be “critical.”

“The Tiger helicopter fleet has not yet delivered the original capability expected by the Australian Government, and continues to experience higher than expected sustainment costs and lower than expected aircraft availability,” says the ANAO.

On the original acquisition of the type, it contends that the Tiger was still an immature platform when it was selected in December 2001, which exposed Canberra to programme risk.

On average, only 3.5 aircraft in the operational fleet of 16 helicopters were available on “any given day in 2015,” says ANAO. This is below targeted readiness of 12 aircraft.

It points out substantial delays in the Tiger’s meeting key milestones. For example, Initial Operational Release was 40 months late, and a highly-conditional Final Operational Capability arrived 82 months after originally planned.

One capability that still hasn’t arrived is the ability to operate from warships.

Sustainment costs are also an issue. Initially, between 2004 and 2019 these were pegged at A$571 million ($431 million). This amount was eclipsed in 2014, and costs mounted to A$921 million in 2016. The cost per flight hour in June 2016 was A$30,335, compared with a target of A$20,000.

It does not help that there are only 119 Tiger’s in service with four militaries globally, which means the supply chain is “limited.”

The ANAO contends that the original sustainment contract negotiations were rushed, resulting in a “flawed outcome.” The DoD also failed to enforce its contractual rights, thus weakening its negotiating position.

The Tiger’s capabilities as a combat platform also drew criticism. The helicopter is unable to communicate effectively with the army’s broader network, reducing its usefulness as a reconnaissance platform.

Weapons availability appears to be a challenge. In addition, there have been two incidents – one in Germany, one in Australia – where 70mm rocket pods were jettisoned with no command from the pilot. The cause of this problem has yet to be identified.

The Tiger’s Roof Mounted Sight (RFS) is also an issue. While the type’s Lockheed Martin AGM-114 Hellfire missile can engage targets out to 8km, per the original requirement, the RFS only has an effective range out to 4km.

“The Tiger may be within the effective range of enemy fire before the Tiger crew can positively identify and respond to the threat,” says the report.

In response, the DoD agrees with the ANAO, and says it has made “significant progress” in bringing the programme up to speed.

“Defence acknowledges the deficiencies of the Tiger capability highlighted in the report as areas which will require upgrade or modification to remain relevant within the future battle space,” it says.

Airbus Helicopters, for its part, acknowledges the challenges with the programme in Australia, and says that it has been “strongly engaged over the last two years” to help fix “all known issues.” It believes that the report fails to “appreciate the significant improvements which have been made in the past two years nor the positive trend of all support key performance indicators.”

In February, Canberra’s defence white paper and accompanying investment plan for the period up to 2026 indicated that the Tiger will be phased out in the mid-2020s, to be replaced by “manned or unmanned systems or a combination of both."

Three months later, in May, Airbus Helicopters defended the programme, stating that improvements to the Tiger mean it will be a viable replacement option to the current fleet.
source is FlightGlobal
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SouthernSky

Junior Member
Exercise Kowari 2016.

Exercise Kowari is a trilateral military survival exercise involving Australian, Chinese and United States personnel that aims to demonstrate cooperation and trust between the three nations. Exercise Kowari will see 10 soldiers from each country learn about basic survival principles, techniques and equipment from the Australian Army’s survival training experts at the North-West Mobile Force (NORFORCE) before putting their new skills to the test on their own in the remote outback. This is the third time Exercise Kowari has taken place and marks an important milestone in defence cooperation between the three nations.

Chief of Army, Lieutenant General Angus Campbell (centre front), DSC, AM, with Australian Army, US Army, US Marine Corps and Chinese People's Liberation Army personnel participating in Exercise Kowari at Larrakeyah Barracks in Darwin, Northern Territory, on 26 August 2016.


Australian Army, US Army, US Marine Corps and Chinese People's Liberation Army personnel arrive in the Daly River region of the Northern Territory on 28 August 2016 for the training phase of Exercise Kowari.


More imagery available here.

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Jeff Head

General
Staff member
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oops (to me, the most amusing: "The cost per flight hour in June 2016 was A$30,335, compared with a target of A$20,000." .

"It believes that the report fails to “appreciate the significant improvements which have been made in the past two years nor the positive trend of all support key performance indicators.”

LOL but I missed a promise how "ultimately" the system will be perfected)

Australian government auditor slams Tiger attack helicopter
.Oops..and here I thought that they had been having a decent experience with their new helos!

Tiger_04.jpg
 

Jeff Head

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and
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with Australian Government


Fincantieri_FREMM_SEA-5000.jpg

Pacific Sentinel said:
FINCANTIERI

The Italian group contracted by the Australian Government to participate in the Competitive Evaluation Process for the Future Frigates Programme – SEA 5000

Trieste, September 1st, 2016 – Fincantieri, one of the world’s largest shipbuilding groups and number one by diversification and innovation, has signed a contract with the Australian Government to participate in the Competitive Evaluation Process, conducted by the Department of Defence, to deliver 9 Future Frigates - to be built in Adelaide, South Australia - for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) under the SEA 5000 programme.

Fincantieri is one of three shipbuilders short-listed by the Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group (CASG), part of the Department of Defence, to participate in the evaluation and selection process, which will last about one year. Similar agreements were signed also by Navantia and BAE Systems.

Fincantieri is offering its Italian FREMM Frigate (ASW, Anti-submarine warfare version), which is currently in service and being built for the Italian Navy.

Giuseppe Bono, CEO of Fincantieri, commented: “We are fully committed to this programme, which represents one of the most important naval surface shipbuilding projects in the world. This is the first ever contract signed by Fincantieri with the Australian Department of Defence and we are very excited by the opportunity to participate in the evaluation process and to propose the very best of the Italian shipbuilding design and construction. We hope that this will be only the first step in this important programme, in which our company would be able to put its wealth of experience, know-how, capabilities and transfer of technology at the service of the Australian Government and its Navy”.
Fincantieri Italian FREMM (ASW Version) for SEA 5000

There are currently 10 ships in the Class – four in ASW Anti-submarine warfare configuration (bow sonar plus towed variable depth sonar) and six in GP General Purpose configuration (rapid response RHIB ramp at stern).

The ships are electric motor driven at low speed for ASW operations and Gas Turbine driven at high speed (at which time the electric motors become alternators). Hangar space is available for two MH-90 sized helicopters. Initial studies have shown that the CEA radars can be easily accommodated with little modification apart from the main mast.
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Type 26 Global Combat Ship for SEA 5000 (image- BAE Systems).jpg

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BAE SYSTEMS

BAE Systems has signed a contract with the Commonwealth Government to further refine its design of the Type 26 Global Combat Ship (GCS) for the Royal Australian Navy under the SEA 5000 (Future Frigate) program.

BAE Systems Australia Chief Executive, Glynn Phillips, said: “We look forward to demonstrating the adaptability and maturity of the Global Combat Ship design to meet Australia’s requirements for an Anti-Submarine Warship frigate. The Global Combat Ship design is the most modern, adaptable and flexible of all possible options available today, and I am confident that we will be able to demonstrate that it is the best able to meet the requirements of the Royal Australian Navy.”

In coming months, a team of BAE Systems’ Australian engineers will be deployed to the UK to join the Company’s established design team. Being embedded into the one of the most advanced warship building teams in the world will allow these engineers to acquire the skills and knowledge required to effectively transfer the technology to Australia.

BAE Systems is using the latest in modern digital planning capability to refine and tailor its designs to the Commonwealth of Australia’s requirements. To assist this process, the Company has revealed that, a 3-dimensional visualisation suite will be delivered to Australia to help improve understanding of the unique features of the ship design. This will enable conversations about design modifications the Royal Australian Navy requires and will help demonstrate how the Global Combat Ship could accommodate the required CEA Technologies’ phased-array radar system.

This is part of the Australian Department of Defence’s Competitive Evaluation Process for the program. The Commonwealth has also entered into similar agreements with Fincantieri and Navantia.

The Global Combat Ship is the most adaptable and flexible design and best suited to meet the operational requirements of the Royal Australian Navy.

BAE Systems is one of the world’s leading designers, builders and systems integrators of naval ships and submarines. BAE Systems Australia has been building, upgrading and maintaining the Royal Australian Navy’s surface fleet for more than 30 years.

BAE Systems is currently supporting and upgrading the ANZAC Class Frigates, sustaining the largest ships in the fleet – the Landing Helicopter Docks, as well as the Adelaide Class Frigates, Minehunters and the Hydrographic Fleet.
 

Jeff Head

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000 BAE-Systems-to-refine-Type-26-design-for-Australlas.jpg

Naval Today said:
The Australian government has awarded BAE Systems a contract to further refine its design of the Type 26 Global Combat Ship (GCS) for the Royal Australian Navy under the SEA 5000 (Future Frigate) program.

BAE Systems said that a team of the company’s Australian engineers would be deployed to the UK to join BAE’s design team in coming months to facilitate the transfer of technology to Australia.

This is part of the Australian Department of Defence’s Competitive Evaluation Process for the program. The Commonwealth has also entered into similar agreements with Fincantieri and Navantia.

BAE Systems Australia Chief Executive, Glynn Phillips, said: “We look forward to demonstrating the adaptability and maturity of the Global Combat Ship design to meet Australia’s requirements for an Anti-Submarine Warship frigate. The Global Combat Ship design is the most modern, adaptable and flexible of all possible options available today, and I am confident that we will be able to demonstrate that it is the best able to meet the requirements of the Royal Australian Navy.”

BAE also revealed that a 3-dimensional visualisation suite would be delivered to Australia to help improve understanding of the features of the ship design. This would, according to the company, enable conversations about design modifications the Royal Australian Navy requires and would help demonstrate how the Global Combat Ship could accommodate the required CEA Technologies’ phased-array radar system.
 

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