Zhuhai Airshow 2016


Richard Santos

Junior Member
Registered Member
The Chinese invented hand-held cannons using bamboo to shoot projectiles out. The European invented the modern firearm using the trigger mechanism found on crossbows, which were invented by the Chinese.
Actually, the trigger mechanism in European firearms evolved from something that beared no Resemblance from the crossbow trigger mechanism in Chinese crossbows. The original European trigger was simply a lever that held a piece of burning rope. Pulling on the lever puts the burning end of the rope against the touchhole on the barrel. That's called match lock. Later it evolved into clockwork mechanism that spun a wheel that struck a spark to light the powder in the barrel. That's called a wheel lock. Only finally did it evolve independently into something that very vaguely resembled Chinese crossbow trigger. That's flint lock.
 

Totoro

Captain
VIP Professional
So thats it for this years show? I feel we have seen images of maybe 5% of information boards/tv screens with info that usually come with each exhibited piece.

Are there perhaps any photo albums that are circulating through chinese language forums and havent yet beennlinked at this website?
 

siegecrossbow

Brigadier
Staff member
Super Moderator
Actually, the trigger mechanism in European firearms evolved from something that beared no Resemblance from the crossbow trigger mechanism in Chinese crossbows. The original European trigger was simply a lever that held a piece of burning rope. Pulling on the lever puts the burning end of the rope against the touchhole on the barrel. That's called match lock. Later it evolved into clockwork mechanism that spun a wheel that struck a spark to light the powder in the barrel. That's called a wheel lock. Only finally did it evolve independently into something that very vaguely resembled Chinese crossbow trigger. That's flint lock.
The lever is just serpentine lock. Early matchlocks had a horizontal trigger similar to those on European crossbows before the snapping matchlock was introduced.
 

delft

Brigadier
Actually, the trigger mechanism in European firearms evolved from something that beared no Resemblance from the crossbow trigger mechanism in Chinese crossbows. The original European trigger was simply a lever that held a piece of burning rope. Pulling on the lever puts the burning end of the rope against the touchhole on the barrel. That's called match lock. Later it evolved into clockwork mechanism that spun a wheel that struck a spark to light the powder in the barrel. That's called a wheel lock. Only finally did it evolve independently into something that very vaguely resembled Chinese crossbow trigger. That's flint lock.
The wheel lock was developed for cavalry pistols in the early 16th century for the match was unsuitable for cavalry. The snaphance was developed next, 1550's, but was too expensive for infantry. The flintlock came about 1620 but took the remainder of the 17th century to drive out the match lock in Europe.
 

Totoro

Captain
VIP Professional
There seems to be a bunch of interesting zhuhai images out there. I stumbled upon this blog.
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So hq9b was officially shown, even though no data on it was published. (but Henri K. claims chinese army official mentioned range of "over 200 km")

There are also images of various other systems and some info boards that i've not yet seen.

So another anecdotal evidence that hq9b is in active service?
 

Blackstone

Brigadier
Interesting and contrarian take on China's air show by a security pundit, Andes Corr.

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On November 1, Airshow China in Zhuhai unveiled stolen technology from at least one U.S. company. In a marquee spectacle that underwhelmed viewers, Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC) revealed its J-20 stealth fighter for the first time to the public. The J-20 directly competes with the U.S. F-22 Raptor, and is based on U.S. technology stolen from Lockheed Martin Corporation by Chinese hackers.

A J-20 jet performs at Zhuhai Air Show in Zhuhai, south China’s Guangdong province on November 1, 2016. Two of China’s secretive J-20 warplanes swept over a crowd at the Zhuhai air show on Novembert 1, potent symbols of Beijing’s aspirations to military might. STR/AFP/Getty Images

Other U.S. companies have also seen their technology adopted by Chinese aero-defense designers. In 2008 the U.S. sent two Boeing C-17 cargo planes to China with relief supplies after an earthquake. In 2013, China unveiled the Y-20, a similar-looking cargo plane that also flied in Zhuhai this month. The Y-20 has likely supplied China’s illegal island-building in the South China Sea. In 2016, China built hangers on its militarized islands capable of accommodating the Y-20.

Peter Fallon of Sensata Technologies in Massachusetts partners with Chinese companies. He saw signs of his sensing technologies in the WS-10 turbofan aviation engine, used in the J-11 and J-16 Chinese fighter jets. In May, Chinese J-11 planes intercepted U.S. Navy surveillance planes and a U.S. Navy destroyer in the South China Sea area.

China’s J-20 development is behind the Raptor by at least 10 years, and the J-20 maneuvers in Zhuhai were lackluster. But China is rapidly gaining on the U.S. in aeronautics technology , has more advanced stealth aviation technology than does Japan and South Korea, and could overwhelm the U.S. and its Asian allies with novel military aviation swarm tactics that pit large numbers of Chinese fighters, drones, and inexpensive missiles against a smaller number of more sophisticated allied fighters. While the U.S. is also developing this technology, China’s strong and increasingly idled manufacturing base could out-compete the U.S. in the number of units created. China is developing similar naval swarm tactics that will doom U.S. aircraft carriers in the event of a China-U.S. naval conflict in Asia.

ZHUHAI, CHINA – OCTOBER 29: The Y-20 strategic transport plane flies ahead of the 11th China International Aviation & Aerospace Exhibition on October 29, 2016 in Zhuhai, Guangdong Province of China. The Y-20 is China’s first domestically developed heavy-lift transport jet and appeared at the 11th China International Aviation & Aerospace Exhibition which ran from November 1-6 in Zhuhai. VCG/Getty Images
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The U.S., Japan and South Korea are playing by the rules, and painstakingly developing their own technologies. While these three democracies are trusted allies in Asia, much of this development is in isolation. The U.S., Japan, and South Korea, united by common values, should increase technical, economic, defense, and political cooperation in order to keep China and North Korea from expanding territory and influence in Asia.

China has already built a navy and air force capable of intimidating the U.S. and our allies in Asia. We are not effectively defending the global commons against Chinese naval and air force enclosure in the South and East China Seas. We have not stopped the threats of China’s client-state, North Korea, against its neighbors. Nor have we stopped North Korea’s deprivation of its own people. China and Russia are harassing Japan’s airspace, and jointly patrolling the South China Sea. China’s yuan is now part of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) currency basket. Today, China’s Vice Minister of Public Security was elected to head Interpol, the international police organization. Democracy is losing ground.

Rather than increasing democracy in Asia, Obama’s pivot tripped on increasing Chinese influence in Asian and global politics. That influence supports authoritarian politics, not democracy. The pivot was unschooled and half-hearted. China’s checkbook diplomacy has been more effective, at least in the short term, at winning it friends in Asian leadership positions.

Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter has noted that the U.S. is in a great power competition with China. The Pax Americana in Asia from the 1970s to the present was based on U.S. economic and military power that compared favorably to that of China. That peace is now threatened by a China that is rising economically and militarily, and largely because of trade and technology served up on a silver platter by the United States and allies.

The U.S. and allies, therefore, need to get much smarter in terms of limiting China’s access to Western markets, technologies and development. This includes greater use of economic sanctions to pressure China on issues such as North Korea, the South China Sea, and the East China Sea. It includes better cyber-security, and greater limits on China’s ability to acquire or partner with U.S. and allied companies holding or developing sensitive technologies.

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Our attempts at friendship with China have failed. It is now time to more carefully guard against the theft or acquisition of sensitive technologies that rightfully belong to the citizens of democratic states. It is time to apply economic pressure to improve China’s compliance with international law and human rights. We must now, regretfully, obtain peace through strength.
 
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shen

Senior Member
Interesting and contrarian take on China's air show by a security pundit, Andes Corr.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!

Other U.S. companies have also seen their technology adopted by Chinese aero-defense designers. In 2008 the U.S. sent two Boeing C-17 cargo planes to China with relief supplies after an earthquake. In 2013, China unveiled the Y-20, a similar-looking cargo plane that also flied in Zhuhai this month. The Y-20 has likely supplied China’s illegal island-building in the South China Sea.
really Blackstone, that article doesn't qualify as contrarian, just idiotic. stop wasting bandwidth.
 

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