US Navy DDG 1000 Zumwalt Class


TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
"(the more fancy stuff promised, the better ... that fancy stuff of course nonexistent at the time those projects commenced);"
If it existed then it wouldn't need to be invented.

Why you are sinking a Burke is beyond me Are your now trying to make a submarine?
The Burke was supposed to be replaced, by the DDG 1000 class. The Navy had the Number of ships it wanted until that is the DDG 1000 order was slashed so as a filler they had to restart the Burke line.
 

Jura

General
If it existed then it wouldn't need to be invented.

Why you are sinking a Burke is beyond me Are your now trying to make a submarine?
The Burke was supposed to be replaced, by the DDG 1000 class. The Navy had the Number of ships it wanted until that is the DDG 1000 order was slashed so as a filler they had to restart the Burke line.
huh?!
it sounds like we talk past each other
Yesterday at 9:34 PM
I'll pick this up:
in multiple posts over the years I think I've made it clear I wished the USN had adopted an evolutionary approach

(in which incremental improvements are made to a preceding class of warships);

but in reality since early 2000s basically the opposite was going on, which is 'transformational' projects were funded

(the more fancy stuff promised, the better ... that fancy stuff of course nonexistent at the time those projects commenced);

(it's related to
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but LOL! I'm not here to blame Don Rumsfeld)

at some point even the Pentagon should've realized this was a way not just to huge delays and cost overruns, but to actually loosing the naval power,

I mean instead of having now an evolved OHP, a Burke FIII in the water, they have LCSs and Zumwalts projects ... drifting

(plus I think the Fords are a mistake, and they should've kept building the Nimitzes)

but yeah, the USN has even more urgent issues like readiness, shipyards ... at the time it says it goes for higher numbers
I tried to say the USN should've gone much earlier for newer Burkes! I wasn't "sinking a Burke"!
you might also want to check Tuesday at 10:02 PM
oh they did, but instead of what should had been done, which was building more/newer Burkes
in reaction to your praise of building the Zumwalts Tuesday at 9:08 PM

have the last word if you want

actually I'll also comment on your
"If it existed then it wouldn't need to be invented."
right after I finish my coffee
 

Jura

General
If it existed then it wouldn't need to be invented.

...
in short: I didn't mean anything backwardly with Yesterday at 9:34 PM
... in reality since early 2000s basically the opposite was going on, which is 'transformational' projects were funded

(the more fancy stuff promised, the better ... that fancy stuff of course nonexistent at the time those projects commenced);

(it's related to
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but LOL! I'm not here to blame Don Rumsfeld)
I meant the USN was overdoing 'concurrency' by for example, off top of my head, on the Ford: new reactors; new elevators; DBR; EMALS; AAG; new deck ALL IN THE FIRST SHIP

LOL I'm not saying for example new radars or reactors weren't useful, I'm saying they're being procured in a ridiculous way which is to bundle them together as quickly as possible (OK "quickly" was the plan)

I'm unable to explain this more without writing a wall of text, which I won't
 

Jura

General
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Apr 25, 2018
inside
Navy Accepts Partial Delivery of Zumwalt-class DDG Michael Monsoor
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:

... Capt. Kevin Smith, DDG-1000 program manager, said in a Navy news release.
“We have incorporated many lessons learned from DDG-1000 and are proud of the end result. DDG-1001 will be a tremendous asset to the Navy.”


tremendous asset indeed
and
Second Zumwalt Destroyer Needs New Engine After Turbine Blades Damaged in Sea Trials
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Zumwalt-class destroyer Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) will need to have a main turbine engine replaced before the ship can sail to San Diego for its combat system activation, after suffering damage to the turbine blades during acceptance trials, the Program Executive Officer for Ships told USNI News.

Rear Adm. William Galinis said today that Monsoor remained in Bath, Maine, for a post-delivery availability and that, “regrettably, coming off her acceptance trials we found a problem with one of the main turbine engines that drives one of the main generators; we’re having to change it out. So we’re working very closely with Bath Iron Works, with Rolls-Royce to get that engine changed out before she leaves Bath later this fall and sails to San Diego to start her combat system activation availability next year.”

After his remarks at a Navy League breakfast event, Galinis told USNI News that the MT30 marine gas turbine showed no signs of malfunctioning during the sea trials, but the damage was found in a post-trials inspection.

“The problem we had coming off of acceptance trials was actually the turbine blades – so think of a jet engine on the side of an airplane, the blades that you see – we actually had some dings, some damage to those turbine blades,” he said.
“We found that after the sea trial through what we call a borescope inspection, where we actually put a visual and optical device inside the turbine to kind of look at this. And we determined that it was best to change that turbine out before we actually transited the ship to San Diego.”

Monsoor
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, and the
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in April. Galinis said part of the reason it has taken so long to replace the engine is that, with the MT30 being so large, a special rail system is needed to remove the engine and put in a new one. That system hadn’t yet been designed when the Navy realized it needed one, so engineers had to finish the design and then install the system.

“So that’s what’s taken us a little bit,” the rear admiral said.

Galinis said the Navy has already checked USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) and found no damage to its main turbine engine.

In the U.S., the $20-million Rolls-Royce MT30 is installed on not only the Zumwalt-class but also on the Navy’s Freedom-variant of Littoral Combat Ships. Internationally, the gas turbine –derived from Rolls’ Trent 800 aviation engine – is in use on the U.K. Royal Navy’s Queen Elizabeth-class carriers, the under-construction Royal Navy Type 26 frigate, the planned Daegu-class frigate for South Korea and the Italian Navy’s new Trieste amphibious warship.

The engine, introduced in 2001, can generate up to 40 megawatts of power and is the key to the Zumwalt-class’s Integrated Power System. The MT30s drive the destroyer’s massive electrical grid that drives everything from the ship’s sensors to a massive electric motor that drives the ship’s shafts.

A message left with Rolls-Royce representatives by USNI News was acknowledged but a statement was not immediately returned.

Due to the unexpected damage to the blades, which have not been found elsewhere in the fleet, Galinis declined to speculate as to what or who was to blame for the issue.

“Until we get the engine out and actually get a chance to do a root-cause analysis, we really don’t know what caused the damage. What I will tell you is we ran the ship at full power and there was no indication of a problem while the ship was underway. We have vibration sensors on the engine to monitor for this type of thing, so even though the damage was there, it wasn’t to the level where we even saw anything on trials. And even, we had additional instrumentation on the engine during trials when we take a ship to sea for testing, and we didn’t see anything,” he said.

For now, because the engines are government-furnished equipment, the Navy will have to pay for the removal of the engine and the installation of the new one. If the problem turns out to be a Rolls-Royce manufacturing or quality assurance issue, the Navy could look to recoup that money from them.

Michael Monsoor suffered another setback in December 2017, when a
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a day after leaving for sea trials. A harmonic filter, which prevents unintended power fluctuations from damaging sensitive equipment in complex electrical systems, failed. The ship was able to resume its sea trials after the electrical system was repaired.

Zumwalt suffered its share of engineering challenges as well, with several propulsion system failures during its transit from Maine to San Diego. The current MT30 problem, though, is unrelated to any other casualty the ship class has suffered to date.

As for the rest of the ship class, Galinis said in his talk that Zumwalt is nearing the end of its combat system activation availability. The destroyer is conducting its lightoff assessment this week and doing well so far, and was preparing to go back to sea by the end of August.

The third and final ship in the class, the future Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) remains on track at Bath and is set to launch by the end of the year, with sea trials occurring in 2019.
 

Jura

General
retyping from the document inside
Report to Congress on U.S. Navy Destroyer Programs
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(the last paragraph at p. 9):

"The first DDG-1000 was commissioned into service on October 15, 2016, although its delivery date was revised in the Navy's FY218 budged submission to May 2018,
and revised further in the Navy's FY2019 budged submission to December 2018, creating an unusual situation in which a ship was commissioned into service more than two years prior to its delivery date."

there's a very interesting footnote (#19) on the next page (I'm too disgusted to retype it though);
if I understood it correctly, the USN at first wanted basically to accept the delivery (cough cough) of the Zumwalts without combat systems, but now the USN can't ...



took out the rant on edit
 
Last edited:

bd popeye

The Last Jedi
VIP Professional
Thanks for posting Jura....The Zumwalts will someday be excellent ships. The USN will work out all the kinks. I don't know how long it will take but it shall be done.

But as of this date they are all in the same class as the Gerald R Ford;

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In case some of you don't know the meaning of the lemon;

"In US parlance, a lemon is a vehicle (often new) that turns out to have several manufacturing defects affecting its safety, value or utility. Any vehicle with such severe issues may be termed a lemon and, by extension, so may any product with flaws too great or severe to serve its purpose."
 

Jura

General
Thanks for posting Jura....The Zumwalts will someday be excellent ships. The USN will work out all the kinks. I don't know how long it will take but it shall be done.

...
ultimately eventually undoubtedly will ... I've been reading for years in this forum
 

Jura

General
inside
Navy Battle Force Tally Dips By 2, After New Ship-Counting Rules Postpone Zumwalt Destroyers
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:

"This year’s FY 2019 bill put a stop to that practice, forcing the Navy to only add ships to the Naval Vessel Register’s list of battle force ships upon final delivery, when the ship is actually capable of contributing to fleet combat operations."

yeah the Zumwalt in war is good just for scuttling at the entrance to a port to block it
 

Jura

General
Jul 11, 2018

Apr 25, 2018

and
Second Zumwalt Destroyer Needs New Engine After Turbine Blades Damaged in Sea Trials
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now
Shipbuilders replace stealthy US destroyer’s 15-ton turbine
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Shipbuilder Bath Iron Works has replaced one of the massive turbines on the future USS Michael Monsoor, and the stealthy destroyer is scheduled to depart for San Diego in November.

The delicate operation involved lifting and maneuvering the 15-ton Rolls-Royce marine turbine out of the ship, and workers had to build a rail system to assist in the removal and installation of the replacement turbine in August, officials said.

“The number of twists and turns it had to go through represented a pretty interesting engineering evolution,” shipyard President Dirk Lesko said.

Shipbuilders noticed an unusual vibration during sea trials and discovered afterward that a foreign object had damaged some of the blades, Lesko said. Although the turbine still worked, the Navy decided to replace it rather than repair the unit.

The Zumwalt-class destroyers use two main turbines similar to ones used on Boeing 777 jetliners to produce electricity that powers the ship and its sophisticated systems. Combined with auxiliary turbines, the ship produces 78 megawatts of power, enough for a small- to medium-size city.

The Zumwalt and Monsoor are the first and second in a class of three of the stealthy destroyers. The third, the Lyndon B. Johnson, remains under construction.

The Monsoor repairs presented an inconvenience because the Navy crew is already aboard the ship, and the repairs interrupted some of their training, Lesko said.

"We tried to work around them in a way that would be minimally impactful," he said. "We were both satisfied with how that turned out."

The destroyer, named for a Navy SEAL who threw himself on a grenade to save comrades, is due to be commissioned in January in Coronado, California.

The ships with an unusual, stealthy shape are the largest and costliest destroyers built for the Navy, weighing in at 15,000 tons.

They feature an unconventional wave-piercing hull and a sleek deckhouse that hides radar and other sensors inside. Heavy automation allowed the Navy to reduce the crew size by half, compared with the other destroyers in the fleet.
 

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