US Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


FORBIN

Lieutenant General
Registered Member
TerraN_EmpirE nice new avatar :) and you have stuff ! smiley surpris.PNG

Former TOE i know in fact was heavy Armored Cavalry Rgt with a unique orginasition for troops also etc... and mainly a Sqn is a Bn for size after and now use mainly Stryckers family with M-777.

HII Shipbuilding recently lifted the mast of US Navy destroyer Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121)
USN HII Shipbuilding.jpg

 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
[QUOTE="FORBIN, post: 485071, member: 9059"and mainly a Sqn is a Bn for size after and now use mainly Stryckers family with M-777.
[/QUOTE]
The Army never retired the legacy armor Abrams, Bradleys and M109's are still in service as part of the Armored Brigade combat team Strykers are in the Stryker Brigade Combat teams.
SecArmy commits to building a more lethal, agile force during visit to National Training Center
By Codi Kozacek, NTC-Fort Irwin PAODecember 6, 2017
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FORT IRWIN, Calif. -- Secretary of the Army Dr. Mark T. Esper underscored his commitment to building an even more agile, lethal and technologically advanced combat force during a visit to the National Training Center Dec. 1.

Just two weeks after his confirmation as the Army's top Civilian leader, Esper traveled to NTC to observe firsthand how units prepare for battle. Enhancing Army readiness is a top priority for the secretary, and NTC is a key component of that effort. The training center is the proving ground for the Army's Brigade Combat Teams, where units face the toughest, most realistic combat scenarios at a scale unparalleled by any other environment.

"It's a privilege for me to come and spend time out here at NTC," Esper told infantry Soldiers from the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division out of Fort Hood, Texas, which was finishing a training rotation at NTC. "There's a high-end fight out their waiting for us. This is where we're going to learn."

During his visit, the secretary met with commanders and Soldiers to discuss initiatives to grow the mission capability and combat power of Army forces.

One area of focus, he said, is streamlining training tasks so units can dedicate all their time and energy to honing mission-essential skills and maneuvers. That includes eliminating extraneous, irrelevant training and transitioning classroom instruction, as much as possible, into mission-oriented exercises.

Another line of effort is ensuring units receive the resources necessary to widen the United States' advantage over its adversaries. That effort starts with high-quality personnel, and Esper reiterated that the Army will continue to enforce the most rigorous standards for recruits. He also emphasized the need to get modernized equipment and the latest technology into the hands of Soldiers more quickly, and to ensure that Soldiers have the training and experience to be able to operate and maintain that equipment at the highest level.

The end goal is building a force that can deploy anywhere in the world and win the toughest fights against the most advanced adversaries. That's where the complex scenarios replicated at NTC come into play.

While its mountainous Mojave Desert landscape evokes the battlefields of Central Asia, NTC is constantly innovating to simulate the latest emerging threats across the globe -- from drone attacks, to contested air superiority, to cyber and electronic warfare that disrupts communications.

Those threats are added on top of all the other challenges units must confront. Each NTC rotation is designed to encompass the entire spectrum of combat. Among the obstacles units face are a free-thinking, peer-level opposing force, chemical weapon attacks, insurgent and criminal forces, logistical problems, and a suite of ethical dilemmas and distractions presented by civilian role players.

"If you really want a unit to be ready, you have to train at this level and this tempo," said Brig. Gen. Jeff Broadwater, commander of NTC and Fort Irwin.

The strain of an NTC rotation reveals valuable lessons about which tactics, and which technologies, work under real-world combat conditions. Esper discussed these insights with NTC leadership, as well as with commanders and Soldiers from the current rotational unit. He reaffirmed his dedication to modernizing the Army's technology to give U.S. forces an edge over the most sophisticated opponents.

Yet even with technological advances, Esper said the Army must remain committed to the mastery of basic warfighting skills, such as reading terrain and navigating without the aid of electronic systems. His sentiment was echoed by NTC leaders, who said the ability to think creatively and implement simple solutions to problems remains the strength of the most successful Brigade Combat Teams.

"We always tell units, there's no secret sauce, no secret recipe," said Col. Christopher Norrie, commander of Operations Group. "It's all about getting the fundamentals right."
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Monday at 9:55 PM
nobody appears to care here (LOL) so I'll be brief

Today at 7:59 AM


"For now, it appears congressional leaders are looking to punt the issue for two more weeks, passing a 14-day continuing resolution to give them time to try and find a longer compromise deal."
This week in Congress: December’s first shutdown deadline
6 hours ago
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"For the Air Force, returning to BCA levels would create a “$15 billion math problem” that would require leaders to make huge cuts to procurement, readiness and manpower, Goldfein said.
...
A long-term continuing resolution that stretches into 2018 would be the next most harmful scenario, and could especially effect procurement, as no new-start programs or contracts can begin under a CR."
Air Force chief: Budget caps would ‘devastate the Air Force’

5 hours ago
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FORBIN

Lieutenant General
Registered Member
[/COLOR][/FONT][/LEFT]
The Army never retired the legacy armor Abrams, Bradleys and M109's are still in service as part of the Armored Brigade combat team Strykers are in the Stryker Brigade Combat teams.
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You have a quote problem Buddy :)
But i said retired in Cavalry Regiment ...
 

FORBIN

Lieutenant General
Registered Member
[QUOTE="FORBIN, post: 485071, member: 9059"and mainly a Sqn is a Bn for size after and now use mainly Stryckers family with M-777.
The Army never retired the legacy armor Abrams, Bradleys and M109's are still in service as part of the Armored Brigade combat team Strykers are in the Stryker Brigade Combat teams.
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[/QUOTE]

You have a quote problem Buddy :) but you misunderstood me i said retired in Cavalry Regiment
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
Northrop proposes canister-launched UAV for E/A-18 upgrade

  • 07 DECEMBER, 2017
  • SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM
  • BY: LEIGH GIANGRECO
  • WASHINGTON DC


Northrop Grumman is partnering with composites manufacturer VX Aerospace on a canister-launched unmanned air vehicle that could fly on the US Navy’s updated Boeing E/A-18G Growler.

The Office of Naval Research funded an October flight test that demonstrated the Dash X, a 3.66m (12ft)-long folding UAV, could collect and share electronic warfare information in flight with a manned aircraft.

Northrop modified a Bombardier Dash 8 with a sensor suite, which directed the UAV to change missions and locations in real time during the experiment. Northrop’s first experiment marked a shore-based test and will tackle aircraft separation in the next funding phase.

During a tour at its mission systems facility outside Baltimore, Maryland this week, Northrop’s Mission Systems naval aviation campaign director showed off the expanded UAV and its compact form folded inside a cluster munition-type canister. Northrop has not settled on the UAV package’s final form, but the ultimate concept includes the expendable Dash X that would deploy from the canister via parachute, says JJ Thompson. Dash X could be thrown from any aircraft, whether it’s a Growler or Boeing B-52H, and use listening devices located on its belly to talk back to the host platform.

“We did a demonstration where these flew forward, looked for an unlocated RF [radio frequency] object, they went out and they found that vehicle, they listened for the whispering and they pulled it back to this test airframe and they were able to detect, identify and geolocate,” he says.

Northrop is working Dash X through ONR, as well as the Office of the Secretary of Defense and Naval Air Systems’ PMA-265, which handles the service’s F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, and EA-18G fleets. The US Navy appears to be interested in Dash X as part of a manned-unmanned teaming effort with its Block II Growlers, Thompson says.

With its 3.66m-long wingspan and thermal signature emanating from the small combustion engine mounted above its nose, the Dash X has a significant radar cross section. But while some may underestimate the UAV’s survivability, Thompson argues that the aircraft's 60kt speed and tin airframe are precisely what will allow Dash X to fly close to its target.

“How does a company go from making B-21s to this?” Thompson says. “It is actually survivable because it is absolutely so slow and so small, when you think about how military systems are designed, they’re designed to shoot down tactical jets and you’re actually build into radars gates that take away things just as birds.”
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TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
Interesting small change.
Army Explains New Dual-Arming Policy for Modular Handgun System
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basically the US Army is changing it's handgun Policy, before in Regular Army only officers, MP's, Vehicle crews like Tankers and pilots and Squad leaders SAW gunners packed handguns now fire team leaders will to.
Marine units standing by to reinforce embassy security after Trump's announcement
By: Jeff Schogol   16 hours ago

Marines prepare to depart Italy to support the evacuation of the U.S. embassy in Tripoli, Libya, on July 26, 2014. (1st Lt. Maida Kalic/Marine Corps)

Now that President Trump has made the controversial decision to recognize the holy city of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, the U.S. State Department can call upon several Marine units if needed to boost protection for U.S. embassies in the Middle East.

The Marine Security Augmentation Unit consists of about 120 Marine security guards, whom ambassadors, chiefs of mission or regional security officers can summon directly.

“We have contingency plans in place, in the event that violence breaks out across our area of operations,” said U.S. Central Command spokesman Maj. Josh Jacques told Marine Corps Times Wednesday.



The U.S. State Department has warned U.S. embassies to heighten security in the wake of Trump’s announcement, which is likely to anger many Muslim countries. U.S. allies in the region have warned that Trump’s move could be

catastrophic.”

The MSAU typically deploys in squad-sized teams, but in July 2016 more than 40 Marine security guards with the unit deployed to the U.S. Embassy in Juba, South Sudan, amid fierce fighting between rival factions.

Marine security guards are stationed at embassies and are tasked with safeguarding classified material. As of May 2016, about 175 U.S. diplomatic facilities in nearly 150 countries were guarded by Marines.

When U.S. embassies come under threat of attack, Marines can reinforce them with combat-equipped troops such as Fleet Anti-Terrorism Security Teams. Each FAST platoon consists of about 50 Marines, said Corps spokeswoman Capt. Ryan Alvis.

The Corps also has sea-based units and land-based Special-Purpose Air-Ground Task Forces to quickly reinforce embassies and other diplomatic posts in the Middle East and Africa. In July 2014, about 80 Marines from the Africa task force helped to evacuate the U.S. embassy in Tripoli, Libya.

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But all these Marine units are subject to the tyranny of time and distance. During the 2012 Benghazi attacks, it took 23 hours for FAST Marines based at Rota, Spain to arrive in Tripoli, Libya.

Officials at both the Defense and State Departments have refused to say whether any additional Marines have already been sent to reinforce U.S. embassies ahead of Trump’s announcement on Tuesday.

“Our Marine Security Guard Augmentation Units maintain a high state of readiness and can rapidly respond when called upon,” Jacques said.
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Vance resumes T-6A flights, but cause of hypoxia remains unknown
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  1 day ago
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Two weeks after hypoxia scares led the 71st Flying Training Wing at Vance Air Force Base in Oklahoma to ground its T-6A Texan II aircraft, it remains unknown when flying operations will resume.

By: Stephen Losey
“The cross-functional cooperation between agencies spanning the Department of Defense and industry has been outstanding,” Col. Darrell Judy, commander of the 71st, said in the release. “We are actively using lessons learned across the aeronautics enterprise to determine the cause of these events, and are confident implementing mitigation techniques will enable us to return to our primary mission of training the world’s finest aviators.”

Schaefer said they eliminated some possible causes, such as problems with maintenance and aircrew flight equipment procedures.

“As technical and human performance data continues to be gathered, the Vance team will temporarily apply local procedures to mitigate risk to flight operations and aircrew,” Schaefer said.

Hypoxia is a physiological symptom caused by too little oxygen in the body.
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TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
Enlisted combat pilots? The Air Force is launching a test that could lead to that.
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  15 hours ago
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Airmen from the 492nd Fighter Squadron at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, practice basic surface attack techniques off the southwestern coast of England. (Master Sgt. Lance Cheung/Air Force)
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Historically The US Army Air Forces did have enlisted pilots in before, during and just after the second world war, they were designated Flight Sergeant before 1942, Then Warrant Officers, They flew fighters, bombers, transports and more. After 1945 They were phased out due to the numbers of available commissioned Pilot Officers. Today The US Army still has Flying Warrant officers who fly the Army's Choppers. Well the Navy, Marines and Air Force demand officers.
with the Drone program soaking up and demanding more controllers Enlisted Drone operators have come into the USAF.
 
Wednesday at 7:09 AM
Monday at 9:55 PM

just that we don't forget what's going on in real world: "Though Congress has abandoned regular order for budgeting and made continuing resolutions routine, the stop-gap measures are unpopular with military leaders because they continue to fund programs at the levels set for the previous year. Without specific exceptions, they also do not permit new acquisition programs to start."
US lawmakers debate two-week CR to avert government shutdown
7 hours ago
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and
"U.S. lawmakers on Thursday averted a government shutdown this week by passing a new funding extension to keep federal operations running for two more weeks, in the hopes of reaching a broader budget consensus before Christmas.
...
Now the question for lawmakers is whether they can reach a deal on appropriations for all of fiscal 2018 — which began on Oct. 1 — or whether they’ll have to scramble another short-term funding patch over the next 15 days.
..." etc.:
US Congress avoids government shutdown, at least for two more weeks
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very interesting despite not saying much is Report: Current Budget Fight Hints at Long-Term Battle Between Pentagon and Budget Hawks
While the Fiscal Year 2018 Department of Defense budget is still being hammered out on Capitol Hill, a more significant fight for the long-term vision of military spending is occurring behind the scenes, pitting West Wing number crunchers against Pentagon leaders, according to a new analysis on Pentagon spending.

When the Department of Defense budget Fiscal Year 2018 budget request was made, the DoD comptroller said Secretary of Defense James Mattis did not spend any time looking beyond 2018. Absent was any idea of what the Pentagon signified as spending priorities for the future, hints to the size of the military and the scope of U.S. global operations.

What’s known is Mattis asked the Hill for topline growth in the DoD budget between three and five percent above inflation, said Todd Harrison, an analyst with Center for Strategic and International Studies. Harrison and fellow analyst Seamus Daniels released their
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Budget, on Thursday.

While Mattis is pushing for Congress to lift DoD spending caps, Mick Mulvaney, White House director of the Office of Management and Budget is known in Congress as being a budget deficit hawk and routinely calls for spending cuts.

Even now, Mulvaney routinely talks about the need to restrain government spending by slowing the rate of growth in government programs. He frequently makes this argument on Twitter and on Sunday morning news shows.

Compare this to the current DoD budget request for 2018, still being considered by Congress, which asks for $647 billion – a 5.4 percent increase from 2017. Whether DoD spending actually increases, though, would require Congress to increase spending caps put in place by the Budget Control Act of 2011.

Congress will need to increase the current cap on DoD spending by $54 billion to match the current Trump administration budget request, Harrison said. A budget hike for the Pentagon would require adding spending for non-DoD programs important to Democratic members, whose support would be needed to approve any defense increase.

Otherwise, if Congress keeps DoD spending in 2018 to 2017 levels, Harrison said, “With zero growth, with inflation and what we’ve seen with costs, really is a slight spending cut.”

Looking ahead, Harrison said there have been very few hints from the Pentagon or White House about future DoD spending. Until the current budget is approved, Harrison said analysts and defense industry members will still be guessing at what the future will look like with few clues. Pentagon officials said the FY 2019 budget will be formed around a new national security strategy currently being developed by DoD.

“This budget will say a lot about who has the power,” Harrison said.
it's USNI News
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