UK Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


FORBIN

Lieutenant General
Registered Member
1st april joke little kinky :D but one yet try yesterday with Taiwan which going for buy 2 Burke of USN :rolleyes::rolleyes:


Fighters a part ? and crew reinforce the 3 Sqns to Marham




The squadron disbanded on 31 March 2017 in preparation for the retirement of the Tornado GR4 in 2019. The squadron aircraft and crews will be absorbed into front-line squadrons at
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who will carry out refresher training when required.
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The squadron completed its final operational flying on 17 March 2017
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And nah :p the joke for Greece no Taiwan ! :rolleyes: in more OT now :confused: but we are always 1st April :cool:

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this is interesting:
The British are waiving standards to recruit cyber operators. Should the Marines do the same?
While the U.S. military refuses to make exceptions to its physical, grooming and other standards to boost the ranks of cyber operators, the British are going in the opposite direction.

The Royal Navy is waiving most of the “classic military requirements” to recruit cyber operators, Vice Adm. Jonathan Woodcock said Monday at the Navy League’s annual Sea-Air-Space symposium.

"We don't expect them to wear uniforms," said Woodcock, second sea lord of the Royal Navy. "We don't require them to cut their hair. What we need is cyber operators — people who can do cyber warfare. We are refusing to be constrained by the standard requirements for all of the fleet."

Most of the new cyber operators go into the Royal Navy Reserve, he explained. His advice to his American counterparts is to not get hung up on military formalities.

“If you want the best people you've got to employ the best people,” Woodcock said. “Don't employ the worst people because they fit the mold. Don’t be an introverted organization. Be an extrovert.”

Former Defense Secretary Ashton Carter raised the possibility of the military services using “lateral entry” to allow highly skilled civilians to join as cyber operators, even if they have purple hair, tattoos or otherwise don’t meet recruiting standards.

But Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert Neller has indicated that cyber operators should be Marines first and foremost.

Shortly after becoming commandant, Neller broached the subject of recruiting people with exceptional computer skills, but he was concerned about the possibility of waiving recruiting standards, Maj. Gen. Lori Reynolds, head of Marine Forces Cyberspace Command, said in 2016.

“Do I have to start letting guys with purple hair and earrings in?” Reynolds recalled Neller asking.

She told him no and explained why.

“You can let them in with purple hair but we’re going to shave it off anyways and plug up whatever holes they have if they’re smart enough,” she said at the time.
source is DefenseNews
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FORBIN

Lieutenant General
Registered Member
Boeing Poseidon contract includes first UK Aircraft

Boeing has received a USD2.2 billion contract for 17 P-8A Poseidon Multimission Maritime Aircraft (MMA) that includes the first for the United Kingdom.

The contract, which was announced by the company on 3 April but awarded on 30 March, covers 11 aircraft for the US Navy (USN), 4 for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), and 2 for the UK Royal Air Force (RAF). It also includes options for 32 more aircraft which, if exercised, would bring the contract value up to USD6.8 billion.

The UK government announced its plans to buy nine P-8As in the Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) in late 2015, and signed the formal order at the Farnborough International Airshow in July 2016. According to previous announcements, the total cost of the procurement is valued at GBP3 billion (USD4 billion) over the next 10 years.

Further to the aircraft, the UK government has disclosed that the procurement includes off-the-shelf purchases of unspecified weapons, sonar buoys, and other 'consumables'. It has since been reported that the RAF's P-8As will field the same MK54 torpedoes and Harpoon ant-ship missiles as the USN's.

With the fleet set to be delivered from 2019 through to early 2022, the RAF will operate the type out of RAF Lossiemouth in Scotland. As well as the nine aircraft some 400 operational and support personnel will be located at the base, with GBP100 million being invested in new dedicated infrastructure.

Billed as a 'Multimission Maritime Aircraft' (MMA), the P-8A will be employed primarily for maritime patrol and anti-submarine warfare, but can also be used for anti-surface vessel warfare and overland intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR).

Boeing so far has delivered 53 P-8A Poseidons to the USN (out of a programme of record of 117 aircraft, of which 109 have been approved) and two to the RAAF (which intends to buy 15), as well as eight P-8I Neptunes to the Indian Navy (with four more on contract).

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Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Boeing Poseidon contract includes first UK Aircraft

Boeing has received a USD2.2 billion contract for 17 P-8A Poseidon Multimission Maritime Aircraft (MMA) that includes the first for the United Kingdom.

The contract, which was announced by the company on 3 April but awarded on 30 March, covers 11 aircraft for the US Navy (USN), 4 for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), and 2 for the UK Royal Air Force (RAF). It also includes options for 32 more aircraft which, if exercised, would bring the contract value up to USD6.8 billion.

The UK government announced its plans to buy nine P-8As in the Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) in late 2015, and signed the formal order at the Farnborough International Airshow in July 2016. According to previous announcements, the total cost of the procurement is valued at GBP3 billion (USD4 billion) over the next 10 years.

Further to the aircraft, the UK government has disclosed that the procurement includes off-the-shelf purchases of unspecified weapons, sonar buoys, and other 'consumables'. It has since been reported that the RAF's P-8As will field the same MK54 torpedoes and Harpoon ant-ship missiles as the USN's.

With the fleet set to be delivered from 2019 through to early 2022, the RAF will operate the type out of RAF Lossiemouth in Scotland. As well as the nine aircraft some 400 operational and support personnel will be located at the base, with GBP100 million being invested in new dedicated infrastructure.

Billed as a 'Multimission Maritime Aircraft' (MMA), the P-8A will be employed primarily for maritime patrol and anti-submarine warfare, but can also be used for anti-surface vessel warfare and overland intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR).

Boeing so far has delivered 53 P-8A Poseidons to the USN (out of a programme of record of 117 aircraft, of which 109 have been approved) and two to the RAAF (which intends to buy 15), as well as eight P-8I Neptunes to the Indian Navy (with four more on contract).

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Great news! The P-8 orders are expanding, and I am glad the UK will take advantage of the P-8 Poseidon MQ-4C Triton Combo!
 

ahho

Junior Member
this is interesting:
The British are waiving standards to recruit cyber operators. Should the Marines do the same?

source is DefenseNews
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I have not read the exact details in regarding to this, but I really believe that they would have a physical training class for recruits to keep these guys active. Also weapons training and a bit of formality is required. Once you belong to the military, you become a target and you are dealing with authorities.
 

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