Turkey Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


sequ

Junior Member
Registered Member
That might have helped, but then both TAI and Baykar would still be stuck with imported components - I'm not sure that is politically desirable.
We know that the TB-2 uses foreign components but we know very little about the Anka in this case apart from the engine and EO turret. Where does the claim come from that it is politically undesirable for the Anka to use imported components?

I don't know about that... it seemed that the info trickled out not from Baykar so much as suppliers (when they announced embargoes) and the occasional wreckage of a shoot-down.
It's on their twitter page. It used to be less but not anymore since:

Both had their roles to play in the Turkish UAV programme
True

by and large, succeeded.
Except for the Anka.
 

sequ

Junior Member
Registered Member

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Latvia to explore defense opportunities in Turkey: Deputy Premier​

Artis Pabriks says Latvian parliament's decision to call 1915 events 'genocide' not right​


ANKARA

Latvia’s visiting deputy prime minister has praised relations with Turkey, saying they will explore the products Turkey has to offer in the defense sector.

Speaking to Anadolu Agency, Artis Pabriks, who also serves as Latvia's defense minister, said his latest visit to Turkey is to "deepen our political, military, industrial, and of course human ties."

He said his visit is meant to find out opportunities for bilateral cooperation in the defense industry, as well as meet his Turkish counterpart Hulusi Akar and "my old friend" Mevlut Cavusoglu, Turkey's minister of foreign affairs.

Pabriks said they would like to get demos of the Turkish products, and discuss possible "common research and development."

"I would say as the next step would be simply to find out more about the products the Turkish government and Turkish companies are offering ... Baykar [Turkish drone] had a great success ... especially in the recent war between Azerbaijan and Armenia, which shows the superb qualities of this technology," he added.

He also expressed willingness for bilateral military presence. "... In Baltic countries, we have the Enhanced Forward Presence group of NATO nations assisting us and guarding our common border. So, Turkey is welcome to join us as well, if they would be willing to do."

Pabriks said Turkey and Latvia enjoy good relations as "very good NATO allies." "We are both border countries. We are realists. We understand the challenges of the 21st century," he said.

On Turkey's relations with the EU, of which Latvia is a member, the deputy premier said opinions vary "between nations, politicians and parties."

"As a politician, I always supported Turkish requests to become a member of the EU," Pabriks said. "If a country wants to join the EU, it should be allowed to compete freely ... if the country complies to the standards, like we did in 2004, then it is welcome."

The Latvian politician also commented on his country's parliamentary decision to call the 1915 events as "genocide" and said: "I personally think that this was not the right decision. And I also told this to our parliamentarians and to my party."

Turkey's position on the events of 1915 is that the deaths of Armenians in eastern Anatolia took place when some sided with invading Russians and revolted against Ottoman forces. A subsequent relocation of Armenians resulted in numerous casualties.

Turkey objects to the presentation of these incidents as "genocide," describing them as a tragedy in which both sides suffered casualties.

Ankara has repeatedly proposed the creation of a joint commission of historians from Turkey and Armenia as well as international experts to examine the issue.

Stressing that the Latvian parliament's decision "has no legal value," he said: "This is a political declaration and my personal position is that if we want to make political declarations about other places and other countries, we rather concentrate on today's issues, and through which we can help the people today."

He expressed the hope that the parliamentary decision will not affect relations and cooperation between Turkey and Latvia.

Pabriks also announced designating "a permanent military attaché in Ankara" as of this summer.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 

sequ

Junior Member
Registered Member
Head of TAI Temel Kotil:

'First roll out of TF-X is planned on the 18th of March 2023 and first flight on the 18th of March 2025. First delivery in 2028.'
 

sequ

Junior Member
Registered Member
TAI is working on a supersonic drone. A scale model will fly this year or next year. First flight of the full size drone in 2025.

Rumored specs are:

5-6 tons of weight
8 hour endurance
Turbofan engine(s) (IMO the currently secret TF-6000)
Payload capability higher than Akinci (950kg+)
Max speed of less than Mach 1.4
Air-to-air capability
Cheaper than a manned fighter
 

sequ

Junior Member
Registered Member

Turkish Minister: The world will talk about Turkish UAVs, not F-35s​


The steps taken by Turkey in the development of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) steadily steer global discourse away from fighter jets, Industry and Technology Minister Mustafa Varank said Wednesday.

"When we launch our fighting UAVs, the world will talk about the fighting UAVs developed by Turkey, not F-35s," said Varank, noting that Turkey is among only a handful of countries worldwide investing in UAV technology.

In order to become a leading country in high-tech fields, Turkey has stepped up in every area, he told the opening ceremony of a productivity and technology fair in the capital Ankara.

A decade ago Turkey had to contend with importing and repairing UAVs, but today Turkish UAVs will soon fly in European skies, Varank underlined, pointing to Poland's purchase of Turkish UAVs announced last month.

"Previously, we were watching other countries' technology efforts like a movie, but today, Turkey can do its own space research," he stressed.

On the U.S. F-35 fighter jets, a program Turkey is no longer a part of, he said that the F-35s are very successful but Turkey is developing its own alternative with Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI).

On global trade, Varank said boosting world trade and economic competition amongst countries requires making effective use of time and labor power.

"Productivity is an indispensable factor for sustainable growth and also fundamentally affects the competitiveness of countries and companies," he stressed.


Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 

Tirdent

Junior Member
Registered Member
Where does the claim come from that it is politically undesirable for the Anka to use imported components?

It's not a claim but my reading of the situation based on the clues available. It would be a sensible approach too, with Baykar backstopping TAI's effort to hedge against the risks with designs based on proven components. Unless you recognize the different roles within the wider effort, the more indigenous project will tend to look bad, because it generally suffers more than its fair share of problems.

Feel free to disagree, or prove me wrong.

It's on their twitter page. It used to be less but not anymore since:

Note the date on that tweet, it's merely a response to earlier revelations by other sources (the suppliers, wreckage analysis) that the basic TB-2 contained various COTS items. I don't see why people get so defensive about this - it doesn't necessarily reflect badly on Baykar at all, since it was likely a deliberate choice, and one that turned out to be prudent. But just as TAI was caught out by the teething troubles of domestic tech, the dependency on foreign tech eventually bit them.

Except for the Anka.

Here's the thing though, you can't divorce the success of the others from the work done on Anka. If you took it out of the equation, all its problems would then hit Aksungur instead, and domestic replacements for embargoed parts would not now be ready for Baykar to adopt so seamlessly. Anka is an integral part of this success, because it blazed the trail.
 
Last edited:

sequ

Junior Member
Registered Member
It's not a claim but my reading of the situation based on the clues available. It would be a sensible approach too, with Baykar backstopping TAI's effort to hedge against the risks with designs based on proven components. Unless you recognize the different roles within the wider effort, the more indigenous project will tend to look bad, because it generally suffers more than its fair share of problems.

Feel free to disagree, or prove me wrong.
Note the date on that tweet, it's merely a response to earlier revelations by other sources (the suppliers, wreckage analysis) that the basic TB-2 contained various COTS items. I don't see why people get so defensive about this - it doesn't necessarily reflect badly on Baykar at all, since it was likely a deliberate choice, and one that turned out to be prudent. But just as TAI was caught out by the teething troubles of domestic tech, the dependency on foreign tech eventually bit them.
It's fine by me for you to believe this.

Here's the thing though, you can't divorce the success of the others from the work done on Anka.
You are grossly overstating Anka's importance in the wider Turkish UAV sector. Firstly TAI and Baykar are competitors. Secondly, the TB2 isn't in the same class as the Anka and thus could use different (critical) components. I'm sure the TB2 uses a different flight software than the Anka and I'm sure that the internally designed and developed computers used in the TB2 have no lineage to the Anka.

If you took it out of the equation, all its problems would then hit Aksungur instead,
The Aksungur would then be too much of a bite to swallow for TAI. And with the Akinci coming online, there would be no need for the Aksungur, nor the supposed tech emanating from the Anka.

and domestic replacements for embargoed parts would not now be ready for Baykar to adopt so seamlessly.
Like? The TB2 uses a different and foreign engine than the Anka. Its flight software and hardware is developed and designed in-house by Baykar. The Akinci also uses foreign engines and thus would not be reliant on the domestic engine industry.

Anka is an integral part of this success, because it blazed the trail.
Only for the Aksungur.

I've already stated that the Anka is crucial for the development of the Aksungur and it seems like it is going to be a much more successful platform. It has a much faster development and testing time and AFAIK no crashes occurred. But the Anka by itself is IMO a failure. It took too long to develop, too many problems a very low production run and a relatively high cost.

To put it into an analogy, the Anka is Turkey's Tejas, while the TB2 is Turkey's F-16.

Lets put a stop to this, will you?
 

Tirdent

Junior Member
Registered Member
It's fine by me for you to believe this.

The first part is indeed a belief, the second is fact.

You are grossly overstating Anka's importance in the wider Turkish UAV sector. Firstly TAI and Baykar are competitors. Secondly, the TB2 isn't in the same class as the Anka and thus could use different (critical) components. I'm sure the TB2 uses a different flight software than the Anka and I'm sure that the internally designed and developed computers used in the TB2 have no lineage to the Anka.

I don't read Turkish, but I would bet some of the electronics boxes and mechanical equipment in that Baykar tweet can trace their heritage back to Anka work. Even if they might not be the same part numbers, chances are they derive from the same know how. Such things may not be as high-profile as an EO turret or engine, but the same dynamic applies (and I'll note that Baykar aims to use the PD170 engine in the TB-3 - it's too powerful for the TB-2 really).
 

Top