The Q-5, J-7, J-8 and older PLAAF aircraft


Semi-Lobster

Junior Member
Sorry about the SNAFU last time, but now I have another question.

Recently I have stumbled upon this aircraft I've never heard of, the J-7MF/MS here

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From what I've read it was an attempt to modernise the J-7 series from the 'restrictions' of the the original MiG-21 airframe but due to lack of foriegn and domestic interest on in the project, it was canned. From what I can see it looks a lot like the American A7/F8. Unforunately, my babelfish gibberish deciphering skills is unable to muddle through the translations completey. Does anybody have any more information on this aircraft? It looks fascinating and its design almost certainly affected Chengdu's development ofthe FC-1.
 

crobato

Colonel
VIP Professional
Not much information about it. That website already has the best info for it.

The nose design is due because the radar is larger than the standard one used for the J-7. With a more powerful radar, the plane can do BVR engagement, compared to using the standard nose with a small radar, like you would do with the case of the KLJ-6F we discussed about. The radar here might be about the same size as the one used on the JF-17. On the other aircraft, the F-7MF as opposed to the J-7FS which had the Corsair nose, it was never built. It planned to utilize the J-10's radar from my impression.
 

Semi-Lobster

Junior Member
Not much information about it. That website already has the best info for it.

The nose design is due because the radar is larger than the standard one used for the J-7. With a more powerful radar, the plane can do BVR engagement, compared to using the standard nose with a small radar, like you would do with the case of the KLJ-6F we discussed about. The radar here might be about the same size as the one used on the JF-17. On the other aircraft, the F-7MF as opposed to the J-7FS which had the Corsair nose, it was never built. It planned to utilize the J-10's radar from my impression.
Is there any real difference between the J-7FS and the F-7MF other than the nose? Adn why did they not opt for a new designation? This is porbably the most radical MiG-21 variant ever created, surely anew designation would have been in order if it were to be accepted into the PLAAF. Which brings me to my next point, I guess this project did not have PLAAF and was entirely a Chengdu projectwhich is why exports seemed to important to its success? Also are there any specifications for it available? And I guess it was not accepted into the PLAAF additionally because of the extreme lateness in development and far more promising aircraft had since been introduced?
 

crobato

Colonel
VIP Professional
Is there any real difference between the J-7FS and the F-7MF other than the nose? Adn why did they not opt for a new designation? This is porbably the most radical MiG-21 variant ever created, surely anew designation would have been in order if it were to be accepted into the PLAAF. Which brings me to my next point, I guess this project did not have PLAAF and was entirely a Chengdu projectwhich is why exports seemed to important to its success? Also are there any specifications for it available? And I guess it was not accepted into the PLAAF additionally because of the extreme lateness in development and far more promising aircraft had since been introduced?
The Soviet Union had a similar project called the Ye-8 which is the same plane you see down the page. This one actually flew. That was back in 1962. You can imagine the dent in history if this was allowed to reach operational service.

You're correct about the CAC vs. PLAAF part.
 

Semi-Lobster

Junior Member
The Soviet Union had a similar project called the Ye-8 which is the same plane you see down the page. This one actually flew. That was back in 1962. You can imagine the dent in history if this was allowed to reach operational service.

You're correct about the CAC vs. PLAAF part.
Well it seems this bass mouthed J-7FS also flew... or at least existed in a physical state (it seems the more advanced looking F-7MF never made it past the drawing board). The Ye-8 project would have at least given more space for a more powerful radar, history would certainly be different if that variant became the dominant version of the MiG-21! At least this was a good learing experience for Chengdu, even though it doesn't really say officially anywhere, this plane obviously helped pave the way for the FC-1. Hopefully it won't meet the same fate as its predescessor!
 

Deino

Lieutenant General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Registered Member
the MiG-15 and MiG-15UTI in China

Deino once again with a silly or maybe even stupid question, as such time to re-vive this tread … this time regarding on old type (in fact not my personal darling !), the MiG-15 and MiG-15UTI in China.

Fact is that that in early 1950, with China entering the war in Korea on the horizon, MANY MiG-15 were delivered via the SU to the PLAAF.

Said is that in line with the build-up of a modern aircraft industry under the guidance of Soviet experts, the SU sent 847 MiG-15 engineers and specialists to China to begin construction of the fighters by October of 1951.
However no MiG-15 or MiG-15bis was ever manufactured in China since this agreement was changed to the MiG-17 (aka J-5).

1. The still mysterious question therefore remains – in my opinion it is only some kind of Western invention or misinformation which over the years became FACT – why is the MiG-15/MiG-15bis called J-2 ??

2. And then, since the Chinese aircraft industry / Shenyang built the MiG-15UTI trainer versions of the MiG-15 … is this really called JJ-2 ?? Again there are many contradicting reports on that !

3. Besides that … are there any information available about the numbers of MiG-15 delivered and esp. the number of each version and/or MiG-15UTI produced ??

Thanks in advance, Deino
 

Semi-Lobster

Junior Member
Pictures from March 2011 on huitong show Tanzania receiving new F-7s (F-7TG). How is that possible I thought F-7 production ended?.... and who the heck buys J-7s in 2011!?
 

tphuang

Brigadier
VIP Professional
Registered Member
I think it might have been purchased a while ago, and just shown recently. don't know
 

Lion

Senior Member
Pictures from March 2011 on huitong show Tanzania receiving new F-7s (F-7TG). How is that possible I thought F-7 production ended?.... and who the heck buys J-7s in 2011!?
J-7S is cheap and easy to operate. Its very cost effective for third world countries defence who don't need datalink, extensive training to operate many advance features(BVRAAM, IFF, ECM)as they don't face superior enemies who possess those features.

Even FC-1 who prove to be cheap may prove difficult for third world countries to quickly operate and master these system.
 
J-7S is cheap and easy to operate. Its very cost effective for third world countries defence who don't need datalink, extensive training to operate many advance features(BVRAAM, IFF, ECM)as they don't face superior enemies who possess those features.

Even FC-1 who prove to be cheap may prove difficult for third world countries to quickly operate and master these system.
I think most people do underestimate J-7G, it is a fine fighter and can do 80% of the main role ... it is cheap, somewhat BVR capable, easy to operate, proven technology, easy to maintain. It was designed in early 2000s .... it is somewhat modern fighter for most countries. China doesn't need J-10B to face Mongolia, central Asian countries, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, NK ... J-7G with BVR would do just fine .... and remember it is cheap and easy to operate
 
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