SD Forum's Quizz of the Week Thread


Scratch

Captain
Alright, I think I'm probably rather bad in coming up with proper quizzes myself. I'll try someting.

What exactly do we see here (eleborate)? And how, besides the afterburners, or flaps, do we know that jet is taking off?

 

Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Alright, I think I'm probably rather bad in coming up with proper quizzes myself. I'll try someting.

What exactly do we see here (eleborate)? And how, besides the afterburners, or flaps, do we know that jet is taking off?
As to the first part of your question, I am sure that that is a Royal Air Force Panavia Tornado F3. it's an Air defense Variant (ADV)..

As to the second part of the question, I would say that the slight orange you see in the engine exhaust indicates that it is using its afterburner, which it would do to take off.

Specifically, hehehe, that pic was taken at Kemble Air Day 2008, Kemble Airport, Gloucestershire, England when aircraft ZE887 was taking off. It looks like the Wing Commander Hazell and Squadron Leader Rendell were flying.

Here's a higher resolution image from the Air Show:

Tornado_f3_ze887_kemble_arp.jpg
 

Scratch

Captain
As to the first part of your question, I am sure that that is a Royal Air Force Panavia Tornado F3. it's an Air defense Variant (ADV)..

As to the second part of the question, I would say that the slight orange you see in the engine exhaust indicates that it is using its afterburner, which it would do to take off.

Specifically, hehehe, that pic was taken at Kemble Air Day 2008, Kemble Airport, Gloucestershire, England when aircraft ZE887 was taking off. It looks like the Wing Commander Hazell and Squadron Leader Rendell were flying.
It is indeed a TORNADO F3, the Air Defense Variant. Recognizable by the pointier nose accomodating the Foxhunter radar. Also the left of the two Mauser cannons is removed.

While you can indeed observe the exhaust plume of the afterburner, or more precisely the engaged reheat as the british will say, this, as well as the deployed flaps are, as I said, not the hints I am looking for regarding the take off.

There's something rather unique on the Tornado (at least I'm not really aware of other fighters having that feature) to indicate the specific conditions that prevail during a take off.

If you don't mind, I would like to let this go on for now and see if someone, maybe you, can come up with what I am looking for.
 

Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Oh, I see you did say other than the afterburner in your original post. My bad.

Another thing that wasn't mentioned is the fact that the landing gear bay doors are not completely closed...but I am sure that is not what you are looking for.

How about the side vents aft of the main intakes. Aren't those closed after take-off?
 

Scratch

Captain
No, and it looks I finally found something that presents a bit of a challange to people. While looking at the wrong part of the plane there, in a certain way your observation is in the right direction. :)
 

kwaigonegin

Colonel
I don't know, just hope you don't mean the ship which was
Decommissioned: 29 September 2015
:)


hope you don't consider this cheating ... I of course didn't know that date, but that ship was in the news
You got it partially right,, USS Simpson FFG 56 did sink an Iranian boart in 1988 and until her retirement couple months ago was the most recent active duty US vessel to have sunk another.

This one is tricky (that's why I like it) but I think most folks who knows US Navy and her history should be able to answer this question if they give some thought to it ... w/o cheating LOL.

I'll give you a clue.. There is only one left .. officially. Other than her there are NO active duty USN ship that has sunk another vessel in combat... officially ;)
 

Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Hehehe
You got it partially right,, USS Simpson FFG 56 did sink an Iranian boart in 1988 and until her retirement couple months ago was the most recent active duty US vessel to have sunk another.

This one is tricky (that's why I like it) but I think most folks who knows US Navy and her history should be able to answer this question if they give some thought to it ... w/o cheating LOL.

I'll give you a clue.. There is only one left .. officially. Other than her there are NO active duty USN ship that has sunk another vessel in combat... officially ;)
...well, I'll help out then.

Old Ironsides, the USS Constitution did it...a long, long time ago. And she is still "officially" commissioned.
 

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