News on China's scientific and technological development.


Godzilla

New Member
Registered Member
So basically straight converting from crude to ethylene and propylene ?

Just wondering what is the current process? is it from refined oil to the chemicals?
Right now we use natural gas to produce olefins. Run the gas through the furnace and steam cracking the hydrocarbon.
Just built one in Corpus. Exxon has the most efficient furnace designs and they are building one in Huizhou as well right now as we speak.
Sinopec using crude might be cause its cheaper feedstock than gas.
 

FairAndUnbiased

Junior Member
Registered Member
Right now we use natural gas to produce olefins. Run the gas through the furnace and steam cracking the hydrocarbon.
Just built one in Corpus. Exxon has the most efficient furnace designs and they are building one in Huizhou as well right now as we speak.
Sinopec using crude might be cause its cheaper feedstock than gas.
steam cracking is NOT used on natural gas, it is used on crude oil to crack tar and heavy oils into light oils which flow better in combustion engines, produce less smoke/residue and burn easier.

natural gas is already about as light and flammable as can be so it does not need cracking.

you may have steam cracking confused with steam reformation which is CH4+H2O -> 3H2+CO to transform natural gas into syngas.
 

Godzilla

New Member
Registered Member
steam cracking is NOT used on natural gas, it is used on crude oil to crack tar and heavy oils into light oils which flow better in combustion engines, produce less smoke/residue and burn easier.

natural gas is already about as light and flammable as can be so it does not need cracking.

you may have steam cracking confused with steam reformation which is CH4+H2O -> 3H2+CO to transform natural gas into syngas.
Nope we use steam cracking. Natural gas is the primary feedstock and we use the furnace to crack the ethane.
Here is the process flow chart for the plant at Baytown. (I didn't build that one and its on google so its fair game to use as an example to avoid confidentiality problems)
Exxon does have the crude to olefin all sorted back on 2016 from the Singapore plant too, and they were pretty keen to not let Sinopec get anywhere near their process when we were building it haha.
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FairAndUnbiased

Junior Member
Registered Member
Nope we use steam cracking. Natural gas is the primary feedstock and we use the furnace to crack the ethane.
Here is the process flow chart for the plant at Baytown. (I didn't build that one and its on google so its fair game to use as an example to avoid confidentiality problems)
Exxon does have the crude to olefin all sorted back on 2016 from the Singapore plant too, and they were pretty keen to not let Sinopec get anywhere near their process when we were building it haha.
View attachment 79208
View attachment 79207

Thanks. TIL that ethylene production was also called 'steam cracking' too. I had always thought that steam cracking referred only to heavy hydrocarbon -> light hydrocarbon.
 

gadgetcool5

Junior Member
Registered Member
China now graduate 10 million university graduate 30% of Them are in STEM amazing. Just like big river if you increase the water volume no dam can resist it. It will break thru at some time. So all those talk of constraining China is futile

So China now has more university graduates per year than the likely number of births this year. That means in the future, even if every person born in China gets a college degree, the talent pool of educated Chinese will fall without mass immigration.
 

caudaceus

Junior Member
Registered Member
So China now has more university graduates per year than the likely number of births this year. That means in the future, even if every person born in China gets a college degree, the talent pool of educated Chinese will fall without mass immigration.
Including postgrad I believe
 

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