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“WE WANT A NEW SPACE RACE. RACES ARE EXCITING.”
Beyond flying again, Musk said he hopes the first flight of the Falcon Heavy inspires more competition. At the post-flight press conference, he spoke about how the rocket was developed using around $500 million of the company’s own funds. That’s a lot of money, but it’s a sliver compared to the multi-billion dollar price tags of some other famous rockets. “I think it’s going to encourage other countries and companies to raise their sights and say hey we can do bigger and better, which is great,” he said. “We want a new space race. Races are exciting.”

Spacex mars interplanetary transport
Photo: SpaceX
BIG FALCON ROCKET (BFR)
If it seems like the plans for the Falcon Heavy fall short of Musk’s Mars ambitions, that’s because the rocket has been superseded. Last fall, Musk announced updated plans for the Big Falcon Rocket, a giant booster rocket with a large spaceship that sits on top. It’s meant to shuttle hundreds of humans to the Moon or Mars, but was also suggested by Musk as a way to pull off quick flights around our own planet.


Musk said that all of SpaceX’s resources would be poured into developing the BFR when he announced the new rocket architecture, and that it would eventually obsolesce both the Falcon Heavy and the Falcon 9. This week in Florida, he reinforced that commitment. He said the company may even be abandoning plans to fly humans on the Falcon Heavy, moving those missions to the BFR.

SpaceX plans to fly humans in the Dragon spacecraft on top of Falcon 9, and the company had initially planned to do the same with the Falcon Heavy. One of the missions SpaceX is planning would use the Falcon Heavy to send two paying tourists around the Moon later this year. And the company obviously had its sights set on using the Falcon Heavy to take astronauts on similar journeys.

IF BFR IS READY, SPACEX MIGHT GIVE IT SOME OF FALCON HEAVY’S MISSIONS
But development of the BFR is coming along at such a clip that Musk believes the company will move these potential missions to the larger rocket, he said earlier this week. That means the Falcon Heavy wouldn’t have to go through the time-consuming process of getting approved for human spaceflight.

As it stands, Musk said he believes SpaceX will be ready to perform “short hop” tests of the BFR spaceship sometime in 2019 at the company’s new (and unfinished) facility in Brownsville, Texas. These would likely resemble the earliest tests of the Falcon 9 rocket, which were simple flights of a few hundred meters or so.

Musk believes it’s “conceivable” that SpaceX could perform an orbital test flight of the BFR in three to four years, the CEO said in a press conference after the Falcon Heavy launch. That’s close to the timeline he first laid out last fall when he announced the BFR’s existence. But Musk, who is notorious for missing his own deadlines, admitted that some of these goals were “aspirational.” And even if the tests are a success, it would still mean a delay in the company’s goal of flying tourists this year.

But if SpaceX misses these ambitious targets for the BFR, Musk said, the company could simply pivot back to flying humans on the Falcon Heavy. “We’ll see how the BFR development goes,” Musk said. “If that ends up taking longer than expected, then we will return to the idea of sending a Crew Dragon on Falcon Heavy around the Moon, and potentially doing other things with crew on Falcon Heavy.”


Photo: SpaceX
FALCON 9 (AND DRAGON)
SpaceX is a business, and it needs to make money. It does that with its workhorse rocket, the Falcon 9, which launched 18 successful missions in 2017 — the most ever for the spaceflight company. SpaceX’s 2018 launch calendar is even more ambitious.

Many of those launches will send satellites or ISS cargo to space. The ones most closely watched, though, will be those that relate to shuttling NASA astronauts to the ISS. First, the company will fly a demonstration mission using the Falcon 9 and an empty version of its human-carrying Dragon spacecraft. That’s slated to happen sometime midyear.

FALCON 9 IS STILL THE WORKHORSE, AND IT’S NOT GOING AWAY ANY TIME SOON
If that test goes well, NASA astronauts could fly into space in a Dragon spacecraft aboard a Falcon 9 by the end of the year. But it’s also likely that the crewed mission will be delayed. A recent report from the Government Accountability Office claimed SpaceX won’t be certified to fly NASA astronauts until late 2019 at the earliest due to safety concerns.

SpaceX has flown the Falcon 9 for nearly eight years now, and the company’s upgraded the rocket along the way, more than doubling the capacity it can bring to orbit. In 2018, we’ll see the final version of the Falcon 9 — known as “Block 5” — take flight, which will have nearly triple the lift strength of the original version. It will also be used on those astronaut missions. Musk said that we should expect the first Block 5 flight “shortly,” and that “it’s all hands on deck for crew Dragon.”

We’ll also see the company continue to attempt to catch the two halves of the nose cone that covers up each rocket’s payload, known as the fairing, in 2018. SpaceX recently retrofitted a boat with massive metal arms with the intent of catching the fairings before they splash down in the ocean — “like a catcher’s mitt,” Musk said this week. Musk also mused that SpaceX could use this boat to catch a falling Dragon spacecraft.

spacex moon base
Photo: SpaceX
WHAT ELSE?
SpaceX has a number of ambitious goals for the next few years. The company plans to increase the pace of its rocket launches, which is already at more than one per month; start flying humans to the ISS and around the Moon; and finish developing and testing the BFR, which would pave the way for the company to achieve Elon Musk’s goal of colonizing Mars. It’s a pretty full slate, but it’s still not the whole picture.

WITH MUSK, ANYTHING CAN CHANGE
For one thing, SpaceX still has to show a lot more of its own work when it comes to the company’s plans for the Moon and Mars. Beyond a few pretty renderings of lunar and Martian bases, we still have no concrete details on how Musk believes he can (let alone will) build these human habitats. He has also often dodged one of the most important questions: how he plans to keep humans alive during extended spaceflight, where radiation is a problem. Large questions remain about how it would even be possible to live on Mars for any extended period of time. And, most importantly, it’s still not totally clear how he would fund the whole effort.

It’s also unclear how the recent political shift in America might alter any of these plans. Musk still says his ultimate goal is to make humans an interplanetary species. But Donald Trump recently signed a (vague) policy directive with a renewed focus on the Moon. Both Trump and his vice president Mike Pence offered congratulations to Musk on Twitter after the Falcon Heavy’s success, and Musk was quick to thank each of them. SpaceX owes its success to NASA, which has been a customer since the very beginning. The company obviously hopes that doesn’t change anytime soon.

If one thing is certain about where SpaceX goes next, it’s that some (or maybe all) of these plans will change — at least a little. Not only is Elon Musk known for stretching and missing deadlines, but he often tears the plans to shreds. What results from that process, however, can often be something spectacular.
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
TeslaSpace-20180207095630485.jpg
Incidentally the Tesla missed a Mars capture orbit. It's in a Orbital loop where the parapsis is around the earth the Apoapsis is in the Asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Man What a Trip!
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
Dream Chaser Cargo Spaceplane Assembly Poised To Begin
Apr 19, 2018
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| Aerospace Daily & Defense Report

  • Dream Chaser: NASA

    COLORADO SPRINGS—Sierra Nevada expects to receive aeroshell panels next month for the first orbital Dream Chaser, marking a key milestone in the run-up to the start of spaceplane assembly at the company’s Louisville, Colorado, facility.

    The panels, along with the vehicle’s composite primary structure, are produced by
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    , and form the bulk of the vehicle’s aerodynamic surfaces. The structural elements are coming together as Sierra Nevada continues through critical design review (CDR), the final phases of which are expected to be completed in July.

    The Dream Chaser is under development to deliver cargo to the International Space Station (ISS) under
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    ’s 2016 Commercial Resupply Services 2 (CRS2) contract. It is on schedule for first launch in the fourth quarter of 2020 on a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5.
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    formally approved the go-ahead for the start of the winged vehicle’s cargo missions to the space station in early February. The flight will be the first of six under the CRS 2 contract.

    Sierra Nevada received the go-ahead after successfully completing a key autonomous glide approach and landing test last November at Edwards AFB, California. The test was performed using the engineering test vehicle, which was displayed here at the 34th Space Symposium. The vehicle will now be placed in “flyable storage” at the company’s Colorado facilities, says Steve Lindsey, vice president at SNC Space Exploration Systems.

    Unlike other commercial cargo providers
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    and Orbital ATK, which flew test missions to the ISS before operational launches began, the initial Dream Chaser spaceflight to the space station will also be the first time the vehicle will have flown outside of the atmosphere. “The first spaceflight will be the first flight to ISS, but it will carry extra propellant to undertake additional testing before we get there,” Lindsey says. The reusability design target for Dream Chaser is up to 15 flights. “However, how many we will actually do depends on the flight test data, so that airframe will be heavily instrumented,” he adds.

    While the company’s focus is for now firmly on developing the cargo version, which will not have the flight deck windows of the crewed version but retains the same outer mold line, Lindsey says the engineering test vehicle will remain in mothballs for an unspecified period. “We’ll modify it for flying crew, put a pilot in there and do some testing in the future. If we fly crew it may not be with NASA. There’s a lot of international interest in the Dream Chaser and we don’t know what path that might take yet,” Lindsey says.

    Sierra Nevada is meanwhile exploring launch vehicle options for future cargo missions beyond the Atlas 5 552 version, which will loft the Dream Chaser in 2020 and 2021. Mark Sirangelo, executive vice president of SNC’s Space Systems, describes the ULA rocket as a “good way to start.” But he adds that “it’s a quite interesting time in the launch business, where we see all the major launch companies coming out with a new launch system. We are looking at all of the launch systems.”

    The space company says it has received a strong response from launch providers to a request for proposals it issued covering multiple launches beyond the second mission in 2021. Sirangelo adds that a decision on the future launch choice is expected by year’s end.
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bd popeye

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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) U.S. Navy divers prepare to attach the "front porch" to a test version of the Orion capsule as part of Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7) in the open water of the Pacific Ocean. Nearby is the USS John P. Murtha. Orion will be towed into the ship's well deck. There are two large, orange mockup uprighting bags in this view, but when Orion actually splashes down there will be five. URT-7 is one in a series of tests that the Exploration Ground Systems Recovery Team, along with the U.S. Navy, are conducting to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (NASA photo by Tony Gray)

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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) The test version of the Orion capsule is about to be released into the open water as part of Underway Recovery Test-7 aboard USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26). During recovery operations, future astronauts aboard Orion will have the choice to stay in the capsule while it is pulled into the well deck of a U.S. Navy ship, or be pulled out immediately and put on the "front porch" until taken by small boat back to the ship. URT-7 is one in a series of tests to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (NASA photo)
 

Air Force Brat

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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) U.S. Navy divers prepare to attach the "front porch" to a test version of the Orion capsule as part of Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7) in the open water of the Pacific Ocean. Nearby is the USS John P. Murtha. Orion will be towed into the ship's well deck. There are two large, orange mockup uprighting bags in this view, but when Orion actually splashes down there will be five. URT-7 is one in a series of tests that the Exploration Ground Systems Recovery Team, along with the U.S. Navy, are conducting to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (NASA photo by Tony Gray)

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PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) The test version of the Orion capsule is about to be released into the open water as part of Underway Recovery Test-7 aboard USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26). During recovery operations, future astronauts aboard Orion will have the choice to stay in the capsule while it is pulled into the well deck of a U.S. Navy ship, or be pulled out immediately and put on the "front porch" until taken by small boat back to the ship. URT-7 is one in a series of tests to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (NASA photo)
Very neat, and no doubt we need to return to our leadership in space exploration!
 

bd popeye

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In case anyone did not know that Orion capsule is called a "Boiler Plate test article".

PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) - Sailors from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Eleven and NASA personnel retrieve a Boilerplate Test Article November 1 during an Underway Recovery Test (URT) with amphibious transport dock USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26). URT is part of a U.S. government interagency effort to safely practice and evaluate recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in an open ocean environment that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft upon its return to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Navy Diver Chief Petty Officer Julio Cerecer)

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This looks like a US Navy MK20 liferaft to me.

 

bd popeye

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The radiation effects of "Deep space travel" will be a big issue for Orion missions. Hopefully the effects of radiation will be slight.

After splashdown the prime recovery ship will be an amphibous ship..not an aircraft carrier as with previous Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions.. The capsule will be floated into the well deck and secured there...and the astronauts unless injured or ill will remain in the capsule until it is secured.

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PACIFIC OCEAN (Oct. 31, 2018) The Exploration Ground Systems Recovery Team, along with the U.S. Navy, practice recovering a test version of the Orion capsule and bringing it inside the well deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26) during Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7) in the Pacific Ocean, Oct. 31, 2018. URT-7 is one in a series of tests to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy NASA/Released)
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
New The radiation effects of "Deep space travel" will be a big issue for Orion missions. Hopefully the effects of radiation will be slight
Not quite. Orion is to small for true long range flights. On its own it might make the moon. That's assuming SLS actually becomes reality.
Orion just doesn't have the capacity to carry humans for months at a time.
 

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