Japanese Mitsubishi X2 Stealth Aircraft News


SamuraiBlue

Captain
Well I guess I went too off topic in the PRC engine thread with some fanboi dupes maintains that Japan's engine technology is inferior not having the technological expertise to develop cutting technology.
Well I guess they will keep on sticking their head in the proverbial sand singing "I can't hear you" while Japan keeps on coming up with new technology.

The one I posted was this site;

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This was announced in 2002 about the XF5-1 engine examining the possibility of Ceramic Metrics Composite.
Yes within the document they concluded;

In this study, the ceramic turbine is applied in the aircraft gas turbine engine.
The structural reliability of ceramic turbine component in the aircraft gas turbine engine has been confirmed by the engine test with the engine performancebased on design. The result of this study has got a prospect of application of ceramic turbine tojet engine.
In the future study, higher structural reliability of the ceramic turbine is needed to the actual use of the ceramic turbine jet engines.
Well that was over 15 years ago and they kept on doing their research and now this.

IHI wants to be Intel of jet engine parts makers

TOKYO -- As airlines expand their fleets to meet growing global demand for air travel, and aircraft manufacturers cash in, heavy machinery maker IHI is striving to become an indispensable supplier of jet engine parts.


Boeing 777 jet engines use many IHI components.


Just as U.S. chipmaker Intel puts an "Intel Inside" sticker on every personal computer that runs Microsoft Windows software, the Japanese company wants "IHI Inside" to be the global standard for aircraft engines. To do that, it is working on cutting-edge materials that are years ahead of rivals.

What are you made of?

General Electric of the U.S. and IHI have each developed ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for use in jet engines and are racing to be the first to supply this advanced material to aircraft makers.

Fuel efficiency is near the top of aircraft makers' priority list, and CMCs are the latest tool in their ceaseless drive to squeeze extra kilometers from every last drop. These breakthrough materials combine ceramics with silicon carbide fibers and can withstand temperatures of 1400 C or more but weigh only about a quarter as much as nickel alloy, a common composite used in jet engines.

CMCs do have drawbacks, however. "They are very fragile and prone to crack," said Kazunori Kanadu, who heads IHI's research and engineering division. "Processing them is unspeakably troublesome."

IHI and GE are both pitching their CMC engine parts for Boeing's 777X jets scheduled for launch in 2020. They are rushing to scale up production in the meantime..... to read more click here
At this point there are only two companies that can produce the CMC material, one is NGS which is a joint venture between Nihon Carbon, GE Avionic and Safran in which Nihon Carbon is the senior partner holding 50% of the share.
The other is Ube Kosan which is helping out IHI.
NGS had already announced their plans of incorporating this CMC technology in their latest LEAP engine already doing test.
They also showed case the technology at last year's Paris air show.


To those who can't tell what that is, it's a jet engine turbine blade.

Lastly to those who think CMC is still something on the black board and a decade away from actual usage, well watch the vid and eat your hearts out.LoL
[/quote][/quote]
 

taxiya

Colonel
Registered Member
Well I guess I went too off topic in the PRC engine thread with some fanboi dupes maintains that Japan's engine technology is inferior not having the technological expertise to develop cutting technology.
Well I guess they will keep on sticking their head in the proverbial sand singing "I can't hear you" while Japan keeps on coming up with new technology.

The one I posted was this site;

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!

This was announced in 2002 about the XF5-1 engine examining the possibility of Ceramic Metrics Composite.
Yes within the document they concluded;



Well that was over 15 years ago and they kept on doing their research and now this.



At this point there are only two companies that can produce the CMC material, one is NGS which is a joint venture between Nihon Carbon, GE Avionic and Safran in which Nihon Carbon is the senior partner holding 50% of the share.
The other is Ube Kosan which is helping out IHI.
NGS had already announced their plans of incorporating this CMC technology in their latest LEAP engine already doing test.
They also showed case the technology at last year's Paris air show.


To those who can't tell what that is, it's a jet engine turbine blade.

Lastly to those who think CMC is still something on the black board and a decade away from actual usage, well watch the vid and eat your hearts out.LoL
First of all, most people in this forum even the "Japan-basher" do not deny Japan's advancement in many technological area including most people who post against you. What people do against is your tendency of miss-reading, miss-interpretation and often self-contradiction (not reading your own sources). Defending what one's country is good at and being proud of it is respectful, including from myself, but claiming something untrue is nothing people here like to see and will get lots of "deserved bashing".

Let me give another try to show you why people see you this way by commenting on your points made above (bold texts).

1.
only two companies that can produce the CMC material, one is NGS...The other is Ube Kosan
Wrong.
There are more than two, and the one who made the first?? application of CMC in Jet is GE and Rolls-Royce, in the abandoned F-136 intended for F-35 in 2009. This is stated in your Youtube video at 2:21. It does not prove where Japan is in a ongoing engine development. NGS was established in 2012?
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2. turbine blade,
I am not professional, so I must ask you to confirm that the blade you talked about is a rotator blade, not a stator blade. There is a big difference. My knowledge tells me that so far there is no application of CMC rotator blade, the one used on F-136 was stator. Again, that application has nothing to do with Japan.

3.
NGS had already announced their plans of incorporating this CMC technology in their latest LEAP engine already doing test.
LEAP is engine by CFM International, joint venture of GE Aviation and Snecma. Nothing to do with Japan.

4.
Lastly to those who think CMC is still something on the black board and a decade away from actual usage, well watch the vid and eat your hearts out
I wonder where did you get the idea of "others think CMC is decade away from actual usage". I have to say that it is only your wishful imagination so you can ridicule others.

In the very first post that brought up the matter of CMC, it was commonly known and accepted that CMC was used in GE LEAP. The argument was the rotator blade in the hot section due to the stress in the high temperature. This is also said in your VID.

To summarize,
NGS is developing CMC components for jet engine.
NGS does not make engine, it is a component supplier to GE, Safran etc. Just like somebody making sparks for BMW's engine.
At least we know that America and UK are using CMC in their engine before NGS was found.

This very post of yours demonstrates once again that you
1. Either do not research, constantly miss-read, miss-quote and miss-interpret, see point 1
or otherwise
2. Twist the subject of discussion to favor your statement, see point 2 and 4
3. Take credit from other people, see point 3.
 
OK, Samurai, we believe you. Japan is so incredibly skilled and innovative that it used cutting edge new technology to end up with an engine performing at max thrust of 49kN and 7.8 thrust-to-weight ratio. So impressive! I only dream that one day, Chinese engines will be as powerful as 49kN (for my blender LOLOL).
 

Skywatcher

Senior Member
Well I guess I went too off topic in the PRC engine thread with some fanboi dupes maintains that Japan's engine technology is inferior not having the technological expertise to develop cutting technology.
Well I guess they will keep on sticking their head in the proverbial sand singing "I can't hear you" while Japan keeps on coming up with new technology.

The one I posted was this site;

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!

This was announced in 2002 about the XF5-1 engine examining the possibility of Ceramic Metrics Composite.
Yes within the document they concluded;



Well that was over 15 years ago and they kept on doing their research and now this.



At this point there are only two companies that can produce the CMC material, one is NGS which is a joint venture between Nihon Carbon, GE Avionic and Safran in which Nihon Carbon is the senior partner holding 50% of the share.
The other is Ube Kosan which is helping out IHI.
NGS had already announced their plans of incorporating this CMC technology in their latest LEAP engine already doing test.
They also showed case the technology at last year's Paris air show.


To those who can't tell what that is, it's a jet engine turbine blade.

Lastly to those who think CMC is still something on the black board and a decade away from actual usage, well watch the vid and eat your hearts out.LoL
[/quote][/QUOTE]

Wait, you're not actually enough bonkers to suggest that developing CMC means that Japan suddenly has the capacity to actually build an actual indigenous engine, whether for a supersonic fighter or a large jetliner?

That's like saying that if the Israelis can make a AESA radar, then they should be able to build a fifth generation (or even a 4.5+ generation fighter). Being able to develop/build a critical component of system does not translate into mastery of the entire system. Sure, CMC turbine blades and AESA radars are critical parts of their respective systems, but they're far from the only part.
 

b787

Captain
Wait, you're not actually enough bonkers to suggest that developing CMC means that Japan suddenly has the capacity to actually build an actual indigenous engine, whether for a supersonic fighter or a large jetliner?

That's like saying that if the Israelis can make a AESA radar, then they should be able to build a fifth generation (or even a 4.5+ generation fighter). Being able to develop/build a critical component of system does not translate into mastery of the entire system. Sure, CMC turbine blades and AESA radars are critical parts of their respective systems, but they're far from the only part.
Going into the nationalistic view does not help.

Japan was the first nation in Asia to develop jet engines.
It powers its P-X with a domestic engine, same its T-4 and its F-X.
The
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Ne-20
(
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: 石川島 ネ-20) was
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's first
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engine. It was developed during
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in parallel with the nation's first military jet, the
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.
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The Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries (IHI) F3 is a
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engine developed in
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by
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for the
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. The first
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engine, the XF3, was manufactured in 1981 and first flew in the XT-4 in July 1985.

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The Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries (IHI) XF5 is a low bypass
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engine being developed in
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by
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for the
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(ATD-X).

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The IHI Corporation F7 is a small
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engine developed specifically for the
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maritime patrol aircraft by
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.
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The IAE V2500 is a two-shaft high-bypass
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engine which powers the
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(A320, A321, A319 and the Airbus Corporate Jet), the
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,

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based the HP compressor on a scale-up of the RC34B eight stage research unit used in the RB401-06 Demonstrator Engine, but with a zero-stage added at the front and a tenth stage added to the rear.
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developed the combustor and the 2-stage air-cooled HP turbine, while the
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provided the LP compression system.
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were responsible for the 5-stage LP turbine.

The 4,000th V2500 engine was delivered to the Brazilian flag carrier TAM and installed on the 4,000th Airbus A320 family aircraft (an A319).
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They already have a lot of experience, they build many types of engines, i do not think they are behind, but it is stupid to compare, but i do not think they are lagging behind to China
 
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b787

Captain
3.
LEAP is engine by CFM International, joint venture of GE Aviation and Snecma. Nothing to do with Japan.
GE Names International Aerospace Companies as GE9X Engine Program Participants
GE Aviation is pleased to announce IHI Corporation (IHI: previously named Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industries), Snecma and Techspace Aero (Safran), and MTU Aero Engines AG as participants in the GE9X engine program.
July 10, 2014

EVENDALE, OHIO - GE Aviation is pleased to announce IHI Corporation (IHI: previously named Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industries), Snecma and Techspace Aero (Safran), and MTU Aero Engines AG as participants in the GE9X engine program. The program participants will play a very significant role combining for approximately 25% share in the GE9X program, which is in development for the Boeing 777X aircraft.


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b787

Captain
TOKYO --
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has developed a lightweight alloy for aircraft engines that is expected to bring significant gains in fuel efficiency.

The Japanese steelmaker will partner with Tokyo-based engine builder
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to commercialize the titanium-aluminum material by 2020. A cubic centimeter of the compound weighs 4.2 grams, about half as much as a nickel-based alloy now in use.



The alloy also withstands temperatures of around 1,000 C, which Kobe Steel says makes it more heat-resistant than previous titanium or aluminum alloys.

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taxiya

Colonel
Registered Member
GE Names International Aerospace Companies as GE9X Engine Program Participants
GE Aviation is pleased to announce IHI Corporation (IHI: previously named Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industries), Snecma and Techspace Aero (Safran), and MTU Aero Engines AG as participants in the GE9X engine program.

July 10, 2014

EVENDALE, OHIO - GE Aviation is pleased to announce IHI Corporation (IHI: previously named Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industries), Snecma and Techspace Aero (Safran), and MTU Aero Engines AG as participants in the GE9X engine program. The program participants will play a very significant role combining for approximately 25% share in the GE9X program, which is in development for the Boeing 777X aircraft.


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I fail to see your point. Are you saying GE9X=LEAP? The link provided by you does not say so. I quote

History: Snecma is producing the CFM56 and developing the LEAP engine within CFM International, the 50/50 joint company with GE and is a participant on the CF6, GE90 and GP7200 engine programs.
and my original texts that you commented was
3.
LEAP is engine by CFM International, joint venture of GE Aviation and Snecma. Nothing to do with Japan.
LEAP was first run in 2013.
IHI's involvement in GE9X has not started before that article in July 2014.

IHI being included in GE9X has nothing to do with LEAP. I don't see any contradiction between my post and your link.
 
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SamuraiBlue

Captain
At least we know that America and UK are using CMC in their engine before NGS was found.
Yup using Nihon Carbon technology since NICALON™ was the first mass produced CMC product successfully developed in 1983.

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That is why NGS's senior partner is Nihon Carbon K.K. owning 50% of stock not GE.

CMC are not merely components either, CFM International won't have an engine without the material since they are developing the engine with it.
 
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