Iranian Military News, Reports, Data, etc.


sahureka

New Member
Registered Member
on another site a user speaking Farsi indicated that Iranian Navy Chief Admiral Hossein Khanzad in the interview said

There are two phases of construction. First phase is done. The mission is 6 months and it will return to the port for second phase.

and other user :
اشیانه هلیکوپتر در قسمت سینه کشتی نصب میشود و در بالای آن به علت دید یهتر پل فرماندهی نصب میشود
در پشت اینها فرماندهی پهپاد خواهد بود

The helicopter hangar will be added to the forecastle of the ship (Sine)
On top of that for better vision, command bridge will be installed.
behind that is drone command center.



so I delighted in making a photoshop of what it might look like with a hangar in the bow and command bridge

1f7080c64223febb1425018eede740afo.png
 

ougoah

Major
Registered Member
The next stage of the IRGC-AF missile drills continued today, with mass launches of MRBMs such as Ghadr, Emad and Sejjil (1800-2500km range).

Most notably, a ASBM was successfully used to strike a target 1800km away in the Indian Ocean. The missile apparently landed within 150 km of the USS Nimitz CSG. It's not yet clear what missile was used, but it's possibly an Emad missile with an ARH warhead.

Sejjil-1 solid-fuel MRBM (2000-2500km range):

View attachment 67660

I will post more high quality photos if / when they become available.

Having seen the high accuracy from the other footage against land based targets, the step to AShBM is a considerable one but quite apparently conquerable. I wonder how the Iranian method of guiding AShBM towards moving targets at sea is based on. Would it be similar to how China solved the tracking and guidance problems?
 

Khalij e Fars

Junior Member
Registered Member
Zoljanah SLV (2021)

Further to the successful launch of the military satellite "Nour" (10kg) into 440km orbit using the liquid-fuel Qased SLV in April 2020 by the IRGC, Iran's Space Agency recently published footage of the first successful sub-orbital test launch of Qased's (larger, more powerful and solid-fuel) successor - the Zoljanah SLV.

Z1.png

Height: 25.5m
Mass: 52,000kg
Stages: 3
Fuel (1st and 2nd stages): Solid
Fuel (3rd stage): Liquid
Diameter (1st and 2nd stages): 1.5m
Diameter (3rd stage): 1.25m
Thrust of solid fuel motors: 74,000kgf (can be increased to 100,000kgf).

Zoljanah can insert a 200kg payload into a 500km orbit and can be launched from mobile launchers.

Zoljanah is scheduled to have at least 2 more test flights in the next 12-18 months.

Z1L.png
Z1L2.png

Video of the test launch:

 

Khalij e Fars

Junior Member
Registered Member
Iran's Space Launch Vehicles (Iranian Space Agency) - existing and planned:

SLV PLANN.png

From left to right:

1) Safir SLV (existing - phased out): 22m length and 1.25m diameter; two-stage liquid fuel; 50kg to 300km orbit; first test launch in 2008; first successful launch in February 2009 (placing 30kg Omid satellite into LEO - making Iran the 9th country in the world to insert a satellite into orbit. Subsequently placed a further 3 satellites (Rasad 15kg, Navid 50kg, Fajr 52kg) into LEO from 2011-2015. Currently being phased out of service.

2) Zoljanah SLV (existing - under testing): 25.5m length and 1.5m diameter; three-stage solid-liquid fuel; 200kg to 500km orbit; first test launch in 2020-21 (successful). Two further test launches to take place by mid-2022.

3) Simorgh SLV (existing - in operation): 27m length and 2.4m diameter; three-stage liquid fuel; 250kg to 500km orbit; first test launch in 2016 (sub-orbital) was successful; three subsequent launches from July 2017 - February 2020 failed to insert payload into orbit. Work continues to rectify issues (with third stage), further launches planned imminently as Simorgh and Zoljanah replace the phased out Safir.

4) Sarir SLV (planned): 35m length and 2.4m diameter; three-stage; 700kg to 1000km orbit. First launch scheduled by 2024.

5) Soroush-1 SLV (planned): 40m length and 4m diameter; liquid fuel; 1000kg to GSO (3000kg to LEO). Launch schedule TBC.

6) Soroush-2 SLV (planned): >40m length and >4m diameter; first stage will use cryogenic "Bahman" engines (under development); 2500kg to GEO (5000kg+ to LEO). Launch schedule TBC.

In addition, the IRGC has its own space program and its own SLVs, for military purposes (placing small military satellites into LEO).

IRGC SLV - Qased (existing - in operation): 18.5m length and 1.25m diameter; three-stages (first stage liquid, second stage Salman solid-fuel motor, third kick-stage hybrid); 15kg to LEO. First sub-orbital test launch in 2019; first operational launch in April 2020, inserting Noor satellite (10kg) into LEO.

Iran also has a manned space program, which plans to put an astronaut into space by 2031. This was scheduled by 2025, but budget cuts from 2015 froze the program until recently. Much work has already been done on this, I will post about it another time.
 
Last edited:

Nobonita Barua

Senior Member
Registered Member
Iran's Space Launch Vehicles (Iranian Space Agency) - existing and planned:

View attachment 68391

From left to right:

1) Safir SLV (existing - phased out): 22m length and 1.25m diameter; two-stage liquid fuel; 50kg to 300km orbit; first test launch in 2008; first successful launch in February 2009 (placing 30kg Omid satellite into LEO - making Iran the 9th country in the world to insert a satellite into orbit. Subsequently placed a further 3 satellites (Rasad 15kg, Navid 50kg, Fajr 52kg) into LEO from 2011-2015. Currently being phased out of service.

2) Zoljanah SLV (existing - under testing): 25.5m length and 1.5m diameter; three-stage solid-liquid fuel; 200kg to 500km orbit; first test launch in 2020-21 (successful). Two further test launches to take place by mid-2022.

3) Simorgh SLV (existing - in operation): 27m length and 2.4m diameter; three-stage liquid fuel; 250kg to 500km orbit; first test launch in 2016 (sub-orbital) was successful; three subsequent launches from July 2017 - February 2020 failed to insert payload into orbit. Work continues to rectify issues (with third stage), further launches planned imminently as Simorgh and Zoljanah replace the phased out Safir.

4) Sarir SLV (planned): 35m length and 2.4m diameter; three-stage; 700kg to 1000km orbit. First launch scheduled by 2024.

5) Soroush-1 SLV (planned): 40m length and 4m diameter; liquid fuel; 1000kg to GSO (3000kg to LEO). Launch schedule TBC.

6) Soroush-2 SLV (planned): >40m length and >4m diameter; first stage will use cryogenic "Bahman" engines (under development); 2500kg to GEO (5000kg+ to LEO). Launch schedule TBC.

In addition, the IRGC has its own space program and its own SLVs, for military purposes (placing small military satellites into LEO).

IRGC SLV - Qased (existing - in operation): 18.5m length and 1.25m diameter; three-stages (first stage liquid, second stage Salman solid-fuel motor, third kick-stage hybrid); 15kg to LEO. First sub-orbital test launch in 2019; first operational launch in April 2020, inserting Noor satellite (10kg) into LEO.

Iran also has a manned space program, which plans to put an astronaut into space by 2031. This was scheduled by 2025, but budget cuts from 2015 froze the program until recently. Much work has already been done on this, I will post about it another time.
One forbes article mentioned the SLV has enough range to be used as intercontinental range missile?
 

Khalij e Fars

Junior Member
Registered Member
One forbes article mentioned the SLV has enough range to be used as intercontinental range missile?
Zoljanah SLV is made by the ISA for civil purposes, and Iran has no intention to publicly build ICBMs, although it has possessed the ability to do so for many years now.

But yes, it's true that, if converted to an ICBM, the Zoljanah could be used as an ICBM (defined as having a range >5500km), but it would not make much sense because it is very large and quite expensive. One Iranian OSINT analyst calculated that a Zoljanah SLV that used a Salman motor for its third stage (instead of the liquid fuel third stage currently used for inserting payloads into space/orbit) would have a c. 8000km range with a 500kg warhead.

The 1.5m diameter first stage solid fuel motors of the Zoljanah are important because they are the largest and most powerful solid fuel engines revealed by Iran to date (likely tested since at least 2017). The carbon filament Salman solid motor with TVC (used as the second stage in the IRGC's Qased SLV) was revealed in early 2020 (and likely tested since at least 2016) was a huge development for latent ICBM capability.

Iran has tested far more powerful engines than these, but will not, in my view, publicly develop or test an ICBM. Instead, it has proven latent ICBM capability (this was basically confirmed by an IRGC commander a few months ago).

I am already convinced by IRGC-AF's missiles and their ability to strike key targets in a c. 2000km radius of Iran to deter military aggression against Iran. Now I am more excited about the space program, which was dormant because of budget cuts for many years (after making huge progress very quickly from 2000-2012), but is now being funded again and back on track to build on Iran's achievement of being only the 9th country in the world to domestically launch a satellite into orbit. The next goal is for Iran join the race for the 4th country to send an astronaut into space. With sufficient funding and political will, this is definitely achievable for Iran.
 

Nobonita Barua

Senior Member
Registered Member
Zoljanah SLV is made by the ISA for civil purposes, and Iran has no intention to publicly build ICBMs, although it has possessed the ability to do so for many years now.

But yes, it's true that, if converted to an ICBM, the Zoljanah could be used as an ICBM (defined as having a range >5500km), but it would not make much sense because it is very large and quite expensive. One Iranian OSINT analyst calculated that a Zoljanah SLV that used a Salman motor for its third stage (instead of the liquid fuel third stage currently used for inserting payloads into space/orbit) would have a c. 8000km range with a 500kg warhead.

The 1.5m diameter first stage solid fuel motors of the Zoljanah are important because they are the largest and most powerful solid fuel engines revealed by Iran to date (likely tested since at least 2017). The carbon filament Salman solid motor with TVC (used as the second stage in the IRGC's Qased SLV) was revealed in early 2020 (and likely tested since at least 2016) was a huge development for latent ICBM capability.

Iran has tested far more powerful engines than these, but will not, in my view, publicly develop or test an ICBM. Instead, it has proven latent ICBM capability (this was basically confirmed by an IRGC commander a few months ago).

I am already convinced by IRGC-AF's missiles and their ability to strike key targets in a c. 2000km radius of Iran to deter military aggression against Iran. Now I am more excited about the space program, which was dormant because of budget cuts for many years (after making huge progress very quickly from 2000-2012), but is now being funded again and back on track to build on Iran's achievement of being only the 9th country in the world to domestically launch a satellite into orbit. The next goal is for Iran join the race for the 4th country to send an astronaut into space. With sufficient funding and political will, this is definitely achievable for Iran.
That's fantastic. But I think Iran needs "unofficial" nukes first to be honest.
 

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