F-22 Raptor Thread


I'm sure its fine, with that type of intensive maintenance, it likely was brought back up to new standard.
and in the meantime

"... We have posted the full document
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for you to review, but we have also distilled it down into some key points and takeaways.

Working primarily with RAND's conclusions from 2011, the Air Force crafted the following cost estimates and assumptions for what it would take to restart F-22 production and produce 194 additional Raptors:

  • Total non-recurring start-up costs over a five year period totaling $9.869 billion in 2016 dollars, equal to more than $10 billion in 2018 dollars at the time of writing.
  • This included approximately $228 million to refurbish production tooling, $1.218 billion to requalify sources of components and raw materials, $5.768 billion to redesign four subsystems, and $1.156 billion in other associated “restart costs,” along with $1.498 billion in “additional government costs.”
  • Two of the four subsystems needing "redesign" would be the AN/APG-77 low probability intercept (LPI) radar and the F119 engine, neither of which are still in production.
  • The other two were the aircraft’s software package and an unspecified fourth system, acting as a placeholder to hedge against the Air Force discovering that other systems needed replacement during the restart process.
  • The aircraft’s electronic warfare, communication, navigation, and Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) systems were among those that might also need replacement or substitution with another system.
  • While the 2011 RAND study estimated an average unit cost of $266 million, this was based on a total purchase of just 75 aircraft.
  • The Air Force estimated that the initial unit cost for an order of 194 aircraft would be approximately $216 million.
  • This would drop to around $206 million by the time the last one rolled off the production line.
  • The unit price would begin to largely level out after the service had purchased the first 100 aircraft.
  • The total procurement cost would be between $40 and $42 billion, with the entire program costing a little more than $50.3 billion.
The Air Force also noted that while approximately 95 percent of the F-22-related production tooling is still available, the physical productions facilities either no longer exist or are supporting other Lockheed Martin programs, such as the F-35. ..."

etc. etc.:
Here’s The F-22 Production Restart Study The USAF Has Kept Secret For Over A Year

May 4, 2018
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Air Force Brat

Brigadier
Super Moderator
$10 billion is a lowball estimates, and that's assuming no 5.5 generation features.
actually the whole study is projecting a little over 50 billion Sky,,, hey where's my checkbook, lets do it,,, and why stop at 194, lets call the upgrade 5.5 Generation and roll into it whole hog!

In fact lets bring the F-119's up to the power and fuel efficiency possible and cap a few F-35A's off the top if necessary and cut the B-21 in the process!
 
dated 08 May, 2018:
Repairs complete on F-22 damaged by runway skid six years ago
should I perhaps say 'wow'?
An Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor damaged six years ago when it skidded across a runway on its belly could return to service soon as repairs to the aircraft were completed in March.

The US Air Force said that the aircraft is in depot at Hill AFB, Utah awaiting scheduled upgrades, according to a presentation given at the Aircraft Airworthiness and Sustainment Conference on 26 April 2018 in Jacksonville, Florida.

It is not clear when the aircraft would return to a squadron. The USAF did not immediately respond to questions about the stealth fighter rejoining its fleet.

Repairs on the F-22 began not long after a trainee pilot at Tyndall AFB, Florida, attempted a touch-and-go landing, but mistakenly retracted the landing gear before advancing the throttle to military power on 31 May 2012. The aircraft belly flopped on its metallic and carbonfibre belly and skidded 853m (2,800ft) down the runway until stopping. The pilot then exited the aircraft without injury by raising the canopy.

Major structural damage, internal and external, along the underside of the aircraft was discovered after the crash. A team of USAF, Lockheed and Boeing structural repair experts analysed the damages and valued the repair work at about $35 million, including repairing scratches to the skins of the wing and the stabilator, as well as replacing the skins and doors of the central and aft fuselage.

Airworthiness will be certified through a Modification Airworthiness Certification Criteria determination board, according to the presentation. The USAF anticipates the aircraft will be restored to its original certified service life without incurring any additional maintenance or inspections.

The upcoming return of the aircraft to service comes as another F-22 experienced a similar mishaps in April 2018, skidding on its belly across the runway of NAS Fallon near Reno, Nevada on after takeoff.
source is FlightGlobal
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timepass

Brigadier
Lockheed Martin's F-22 Raptor . . .


The F-22 Raptor defines air dominance. The 5th Generation F-22’s unique combination of stealth, speed, agility, and situational awareness, combined with lethal long-range air-to-air and air-to-ground weaponry, makes it the best air dominance fighter in the world.

>> Aircraft Specifications

Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 ft / 18.90 m
Height . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16.67 ft / 5.08 m
Wingspan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44.5 ft / 13.56 m
Wing Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 840 ft2 / 78.04 m2
Horizontal Tail Span. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 ft / 8.84 m
Engine Thrust Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,000 lb / 15,876 kg
 

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