Chinese UAV & UCAV development


AkelaFreedom

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Could be something like this.
View attachment 55844
Which is an art rendered upon XB-70 supersonic flight captured in a photo:
View attachment 55845
The fact is that at such heights there is very little condensate that would form such bundles and at supersonic speeds they may not be. This is most likely the Prandtl – Glauert effect which forms the condensation of atmospheric moisture behind the object, but moving at transonic speeds.
 

xyqq

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The fact is that at such heights there is very little condensate that would form such bundles and at supersonic speeds they may not be. This is most likely the Prandtl – Glauert effect which forms the condensation of atmospheric moisture behind the object, but moving at transonic speeds.
Like XB-70, WZ-8 gets most of its high-speed lift from "riding" the shock wave. Yes, the condensation effect is not as obvious in the high altitude as in the low altitude, but the speed is a lot faster too. The picture below probably gives a more accurate rendering.
XB-70-shockwave1.jpg
 

xyqq

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Here are two options with simulating shock wave with and without lugs.

View attachment 55863
View attachment 55864
Again, good job! How about adding some shockwave effect on top of the head, similar to XB-70 images? That will show that the lugs hide well behind the main shockwave generated by the head cone.
In addition, WZ-8 is likely to turn upside down during high-speed cruise for vertical stabilizers to better capture the shockwave (just as XB-70 lowers its wing tips) so that the plane can ride on it more comfortably . This sounds exotic, but the aerodynamics suggests so. It won't hurt to demonstrate that possibility in addition to the current option.
 
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AkelaFreedom

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Again, good job! How about adding some shockwave effect on top of the head, similar to XB-70 images? That will show that the lugs hide well behind the main shockwave generated by the head cone.
In addition, WZ-8 is likely to turn upside down during high-speed cruise for vertical stabilizers to better capture the shockwave (just as XB-70 lowers its wing tips) so that the plane can ride on it more comfortably . This sounds exotic, but the aerodynamics suggests so. It won't hurt to demonstrate that possibility in addition to the current option.
Yes, it’s an interesting idea to flip the WZ-8 while accelerating it to the desired height. But at the same time, I am confused by the fact that the transceiver antennas that are in the upper part of the body will be in the shade, how will the control over the flight be carried out. Yes, and I added a shock wave in the bow
 

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xyqq

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Yes, it’s an interesting idea to flip the WZ-8 while accelerating it to the desired height. But at the same time, I am confused by the fact that the transceiver antennas that are in the upper part of the body will be in the shade, how will the control over the flight be carried out. Yes, and I added a shock wave in the bow
An excellent picture!
If an antenna is not directional, simply putting composite skins on both sides will solve the problem.
For a directional one (e.g. satellite), some rotating mechanism (which is needed anyway) can be used.
What do you think?
 
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AkelaFreedom

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An excellent picture!
If an antenna is not directional, simply putting composite skins on both sides will solve the problem.
For a directional one (e.g. satellite), some rotating mechanism (which is needed anyway) can be used.
What do you think?
Composite material should be very heat-resistant, because there will be very high temperatures. Looking at the photos from the parade, I noticed that at the bottom there are almost no signs of any sensors or panels for them.
 

xyqq

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Composite material should be very heat-resistant, because there will be very high temperatures. Looking at the photos from the parade, I noticed that at the bottom there are almost no signs of any sensors or panels for them.
The most heated part is the nose cone, and the composite material can withstand 350 degrees celsius as per the exhibit sample. This part creates a shockwave shadow for the rest of WZ-8 so as the heat is not a big issue.
heat-resistant-cone.jpg
The circles on the belly of WZ-8 indicate some windows for communication antennas (similar to those on top, especially the one behind the nose cone).
WZ-8-belly.jpg
When WZ-8 flips during the high-speed cruise, the main radar equipment on the back can scan the earth surface.
 
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AkelaFreedom

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The most heated part is the nose cone, and the composite material can withstand 350 degrees celsius as per the exhibit sample. This part creates a shockwave shadow for the rest of WZ-8 so as the heat is not a big issue.
View attachment 55877
The circles on the belly of WZ-8 indicate some windows for communication antennas (similar to those on top, especially the one behind the nose cone).
View attachment 55878
When WZ-8 flips during the high-speed cruise, the main radar equipment on the back can scan the earth surface.
Well, that means high temperatures are not an obstacle.
In the larger picture, it is clear that these are rectangular hatches and their color does not match the one on the antenna material, so I suppose that there is something else.
WZ-8 elem.jpg
 

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