Chinese semiconductor industry


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localizer

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Holy smokes that's fast (if it isn't severely delayed)! Didn't Western "experts" say it would take China more than 10 years to get close to here? At this rate, they might hit 3nm before Samsung/TSMC!

When Chinese semiconductor tech comes into full parity with the best of the world, China should really host a national party with "Thank You Donald Trump" banners everywhere, this time actually with more attendance than any rally or welcome he's ever attended. I wanna see if he tries to spin it as a positive of how much China loves him! LOL
This 7nm will be the limit. They are trying to get there without ASML's EUV machines.

Intel can't even get to 10nm on the last gen technology, think how hard it will be for SMIC. Intel has ASML's machines and will skip to 5 or 3nm.
 

AndrewS

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Holy smokes that's fast (if it isn't severely delayed)! Didn't Western "experts" say it would take China more than 10 years to get close to here? At this rate, they might hit 3nm before Samsung/TSMC!

When Chinese semiconductor tech comes into full parity with the best of the world, China should really host a national party with "Thank You Donald Trump" banners everywhere, this time actually with more attendance than any rally or welcome he's ever attended. I wanna see if he tries to spin it as a positive of how much China loves him! LOL
Yes, SMIC at 7nm is good news from the Chinese perspective.

But anything better would require access to EUV machines, and they need these now so to start learning how to use them.
 

Hendrik_2000

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Via xyz. Look like a good an powerful desktop for Chinese market in order to comply with Chinese government regulation that all desktop use all domestic chip in 3 or 4 years

cntechpost.com
HP releases desktop PC based on China-made processor
Taylor
2-3 minutes

HP today announced the desktop computer HP 268 Pro G1, which uses the Zhaoxin Kaixian E series processor made in China for the first time.

It is also equipped with a Chinese version of the BOIS interface, mainly for Chinese enterprise users. Users can choose to pre-install the Windows 10 Shenzhou Netcom Government Edition operating system.

HP 268 Pro G1 is equipped with Zhaoxin KaixianE series 8-core KX-U6780A processor and Zhaoxin C960 integrated graphics.


The processor is clocked at 2.7GHz, provides 8M cache, and fully supports the x86 high-end general-purpose chip instruction set. Its performance has jumped 252% compared to Zhaoxin C series processors, and it takes only 14 seconds to boot up.

It is equipped with dual memory slots and supports up to 16 GB DDR4-2666 SDRAM memory with a transfer rate of up to 2666 MT / s.

Users can choose up to 512GB PCIe M.2 high-speed solid-state drive and 2TB SATA mechanical hard drive.

HP 268 Pro G1 also supports Windows 7 official driver download, is compatible with Windows XP, and supports pre-installed Kirin Linux system. Users can configure the system freely and simply according to their personal preferences.

In addition, in order to better apply to diverse application scenarios in the financial, medical, retail, manufacturing and other industries, the HP 268 Pro G1 uses a rich interface and scalable functional design. A total of 10 USB ports are configured on the front and back of the chassis, supporting native PCI slots , VGA and HDMI interfaces.

The HP 268 Pro G1 uses EPA90 certified power supplies to provide a higher energy efficiency conversion rate than ordinary power supplies, helping to reduce corporate electricity costs.

Users can also choose to extend the warranty service for up to 5 years.


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1586882104546.png
 

Hendrik_2000

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Via Raphael, The inevitable happened HiSillicon place an order for 14 nm SOC with SMIC
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HiSilicon, Huawei's elite chip division, has placed 14nm orders with Semiconductor Manufacturing International (SMIC), China's top chipmaker, instead of TSMC, according to a
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report today citing unnamed industry sources.

HiSilicon's Kirin 710 smartphone processor, which is based on TSMC's 12nm FinFET node, has been out since mid-2018. There is a rumor that HiSilicon is planning to release a gimped variant of the Kirin 710, the Kirin 710A. Kirin 710A is expected to leverage the 14nm FinFET process and, thus, HiSilicon needs a fab that's capable of pumping out the chips.

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, so that could be another reason why HiSilicon decided to switch from TSMC.

SMIC's first-generation 14nm FinFET process has been up and running since the fourth quarter of 2019. The Chinese fab's financial data reveals that the node contributed to about 1% of the company's total wafer revenue in Q4; however, SMIC plans to ramp up production progressively this year.

Although SMIC might seem like an underdog compared to TSMC, the Chinese chipmaker shouldn't be underestimated. SMIC is looking to skip the 10nm node completely and transition
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. The company expects to run risk production of its 7nm process by the end of 2020. TSMC's EUV process is proceeding smoothly. HiSilicon is allegedly on TSMC's client list to leverage the EUV node; however, that'll depend on the outcome of the proposed U.S. block on Huawei.

China continues to push hard to
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and achieve self-sufficiency. SMIC is one of the pieces on the board that China can use to accomplish its goals.
 

muddie

Junior Member
Via Raphael, The inevitable happened HiSillicon place an order for 14 nm SOC with SMIC
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HiSilicon, Huawei's elite chip division, has placed 14nm orders with Semiconductor Manufacturing International (SMIC), China's top chipmaker, instead of TSMC, according to a
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
report today citing unnamed industry sources.

HiSilicon's Kirin 710 smartphone processor, which is based on TSMC's 12nm FinFET node, has been out since mid-2018. There is a rumor that HiSilicon is planning to release a gimped variant of the Kirin 710, the Kirin 710A. Kirin 710A is expected to leverage the 14nm FinFET process and, thus, HiSilicon needs a fab that's capable of pumping out the chips.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
, so that could be another reason why HiSilicon decided to switch from TSMC.

SMIC's first-generation 14nm FinFET process has been up and running since the fourth quarter of 2019. The Chinese fab's financial data reveals that the node contributed to about 1% of the company's total wafer revenue in Q4; however, SMIC plans to ramp up production progressively this year.

Although SMIC might seem like an underdog compared to TSMC, the Chinese chipmaker shouldn't be underestimated. SMIC is looking to skip the 10nm node completely and transition
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
. The company expects to run risk production of its 7nm process by the end of 2020. TSMC's EUV process is proceeding smoothly. HiSilicon is allegedly on TSMC's client list to leverage the EUV node; however, that'll depend on the outcome of the proposed U.S. block on Huawei.

China continues to push hard to
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and achieve self-sufficiency. SMIC is one of the pieces on the board that China can use to accomplish its goals.
The U.S. has threatened to block TSMC from selling to Huawei, but I don't think it's viable, since they would have blocked it a long time ago if it was that easy. TSMC is one of Taiwan's most important companies and not an American company. Unless the U.S. wants to subsidize all the lost revenue from Huawei sales, I find it hard to believe that Taiwan would agree to such a request.
 

Hendrik_2000

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Here is the first look of EUV Lithograph machine
Microchips are one of the most complicated objects humanity has created, packing billions of transistors into a chip only a few centimeters across. These transistors keep getting smaller and more efficient, and the current process to make chips is already astounding, requiring dozens of steps, fantastically complicated machines, and atomic-scale precision. But the current state of the art has reached its physical limits. The structures on a chip are now smaller than the wavelength of light used to make them, and any more progress will require a big change. That change is EUV, a radically new way of making chips that uses super high energy UV light created from a complex process involving plasma and lasers. EUV will enable our devices to keep getting smaller, faster, and more efficient, but where the current process to make chips already feels like sc9i-fi technology, EUV feels like magic.
1587232074512.png

 

Hendrik_2000

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The story of ASML the dutch giant in lithograph machine they started in 1984 so they had lead of 40 years. they had the advantage of first mover but I believe China will catch up just give them a bit of time
But typical of European company they value their engineer as an asset and not as variable cost They kept them thru thick and thin That is why they are now top dog
In 1984, ASML's first office was a shed outside a Philips building. Just 38 years later, all of the world's top chipmakers are our customers. What made us who we are today?

 

Hendrik_2000

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Look like another SOE has system on chip beside Huawei via xyz

gizmochina.com
UNISOC is making gains in the Chinese 5G market with its T7510 chipset - Gizmochina
Jeet
2-3 minutes

As the world is seeing growth in 5G infrastructure deployment, smartphone manufacturers seems to have made 5G connectivity a standard feature on most of the new mid-range and premium smartphones.

While the market for 5G chipset for mobiles is mostly dominated by Qualcomm, MediaTek, Huawei, and Samsung, another company from China has joined the list of suppliers for 5G chipsets for the mid-range devices — UNISOC.

As per the reports, China-based chipset maker UNISOC is taking a leap into the mid-range 5G chipset market after the company provided the T7510 SoC for HiSense F50 5G smartphone in China.

The UNISOC T7520 is touted to be one of the world’s first chips to be made using TSMC’s 6 nm process technology using extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). It packs four high-performance Arm Cortex-A76 cores, four energy-efficient Arm Cortex-A55 cores, and Arm Mali-G57 GPU.

It also comes with a new NPU that is said to offer 50 percent higher TOPS-per-Watt rate than the company’s previous-generation NPU. It features a four-core ISP that supports up to 100MP sensors and multi-camera processing capability. It also supports 5G NR TDD+FDD carrier aggregation, and is designed to offer peak uplink speed of 3.25 Gbps.


The pricing for the 5G chipsets are currently on the higher side and thus the pricing of 5G smartphones are also not as aggressive as what we’ve seen some of the companies offer on their phones. However, with more competition in the chipset market, we expect the pricing to go down soon.

Qualcomm and MediaTek are the leading suppliers for the 5G SoC in the market for mid-range devices. Huawei has also recently launched its mid-range chipset Kirin 820 with 5G support but it’ll most likely be limited to Huawei and Honor phones. Samsung doesn’t have a good presence in the Chinese market but the company has started supplying its Exynos chipset to other brands, like Vivo.
 
is it major redesign or is it minor customization when you make these SOCs? considering they're all using combinations of ARM A76, A55 and MALI cores?
Sounds like the same old crap way of making things to me. They didn't learn their lesson from watching Huawei and ZTE. If the major components aren't all made in the PRC, then it's not an accomplishment and not worth mentioning. Like a monkey putting together what's given to him. Every Chinese tech company needs to engineer their products under the mindset that a full US ban on them is coming; if it's not, then they're doing something wrong and not really advancing Chinese tech. Products made like this shouldn't be allowed by the Chinese government to compete with Huawei in China.
 
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