Chinese Aviation Industry


KIENCHIN

Junior Member
Registered Member
Friends of ours have been Mercedes purchaser for decades off the same franchise holder. Last year they indicated to the Mercedes salesperson that they had decided to purchase a Lexus instead. Whereupon Mercedes turned around and made them a deal which would have been stupid to turn down.
My point here is that i think Airbus and Boeing would do the same thing to retain their customers.
There is never a doubt that Boeing and Airbus would do all it can to make this and any follow on aircraft by COMAC still birth but what would happen then, as in the analogy you had given about Mercedes dropping it's price to sway the sale, is these companies profit would not be as much as it should and would have a knock on effect, everthing from jacking the price up on other models to cover the loss or having less money to spend on future R and D. Long story short, just as in the Lexus eventually it will succeed so long as it keeps trying, back in the eighties the lexus were nickname a Camry in tuxedo but look at them now they are on a leaque of their own.
 

delft

Brigadier
You can't reduce weight by enlarging the wings unless you drastically reduce structural enforcing beams within them in which case you'll have to reduce the amount of cargo since you have less structural strength in the wings.
The greater building height at the wing root leads to a reduction in weight.
 

SamuraiBlue

Captain
You are completely neglecting the variability of drag coefficient.
Nope since Drag coefficient comprises the effects of the two basic contributors to fluid dynamic drag: skin friction and form drag.Since you are comparing two sets of wings designed by engineers they should have similar form drag so the only variable would be skin friction. With larger wing surface you have larger skin friction thus larger drag coefficient meaning larger drag.
 

latenlazy

Colonel
Nope since Drag coefficient comprises the effects of the two basic contributors to fluid dynamic drag: skin friction and form drag.Since you are comparing two sets of wings designed by engineers they should have similar form drag so the only variable would be skin friction. With larger wing surface you have larger skin friction thus larger drag coefficient meaning larger drag.
Form drag doesn't just come from wings, but the entire airframe. Even somewhat slight differences in airframe design will incur different amounts of form drag at different flight envelopes. That's why we test entire airframe designs, and not just wings on a tube, after all.
 
Last edited:

SamuraiBlue

Captain
Form drag doesn't just come from wings, but the entire airframe. Even somewhat slight differences in airframe design will incur different amounts of form drag at different flight envelopes. That's why we test entire airframe designs, and not just wings on a tube, after all.
It still will not compensate the larger drag generated from a larger wing surface since all air liners are streamlined for optimal drag coefficient. Try again.
 

Top