China's Space Program News Thread


Hendrik_2000

Brigadier
Via Samsara China launch Tiantong 1(03)

天通一号03星成功发射丨我国自主可控卫星移动通信系统实现亚太地区全覆盖

2021年1月20日凌晨,天通一号03星在西昌卫星发射中心成功发射,这是由中国航天科技集团五院通信与导航总体部自主研制的第三颗移动通信卫星。卫星在轨交付后将与天通一号01星、02星组网运行,将大大提升国家应急通信保障能力。

Successful launch of Tiantong-1 03 satellite | China's autonomous controllable satellite mobile communication system achieves full coverage in Asia-Pacific Region

In the early morning of January 20, 2021, Tiantong-1 03 satellite was successfully launched at Xichang Satellite Launch Center, which is the third mobile communication satellite independently developed by the Communication and Navigation Department of the Fifth Academy of China Aerospace Science and Technology Group (CASC). After its in-orbit delivery, the satellite will be networked with Tiantong-1 01 and Tiantong-1 02 satellites, which will greatly enhance the national emergency communication support capability.

...The satellite mobile communication system is mainly for small mobile terminals, including ground personal mobile terminals, vehicle-mounted terminals, airborne terminals, shipborne terminals, etc., to provide a variety of medium and low speed communication services. It can be said that the satellite mobile communication system can realize the nearly seamless coverage of the ocean, mountain and plateau areas, and meet the needs of all kinds of users for mobile communication coverage. Because of its flexible mobile and portable characteristics, it has high civil and commercial value.

(...)

The construction of China's satellite communication mobile system is inseparable from the team's ten years of silent hard work. They have created history, and history will always remember their contributions.

In the future, the research team will continue to promote the global expansion of Tiantong-1 mobile communication satellite system, realize the large-scale application and operation of satellite mobile communication, and explore the integrated development of 5G and mobile system, so as to play a greater role in the construction of national space infrastructure.


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by78

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Deep Blue Aerospace has successfully completed static structural tests on the first stage of the Nebula-1 liquid-propellant rocket.


 

Temstar

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This carbon fiber based composite material has density of 1.7g/cm³, aluminium alloy has a density of 2.8g/cm³, aluminium–lithium alloy has a density of 2.7g/cm³. This material is also 8 times stronger than aluminium alloy and 6 times stronger than aluminium–lithium alloy.

Composite material liquid oxygen tank is 30% lighter than metal tank and has the potential to reduce overall rocket cost by upto 25%.
 

halflife3

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View attachment 67941
View attachment 67942


This carbon fiber based composite material has density of 1.7g/cm³, aluminium alloy has a density of 2.8g/cm³, aluminium–lithium alloy has a density of 2.7g/cm³. This material is also 8 times stronger than aluminium alloy and 6 times stronger than aluminium–lithium alloy.

Composite material liquid oxygen tank is 30% lighter than metal tank and has the potential to reduce overall rocket cost by upto 25%.
What other countries can make this type of equipment?
 

t2contra

Major
What other countries can make this type of equipment?

July 3, 2013

NASA Tests Game Changing Composite Cryogenic Fuel Tank

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Technicians move the insulated, almost 8-foot-diameter (2.4-meter) tank to the Hydrogen Cold Flow Test Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
Credits: NASA/MSFC/David Olive


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This insulated, almost 8-foot-diameter (2.4-meter) composite cryogenic propellant tank recently completed testing inside the Hydrogen Cold Flow Test Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
Credits: NASA/MSFC/David Olive

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A robot places composite fibers on the tank’s inner wall structure. Engineers at Boeing Research & Technology formed the composite cryogenic tank using automated fiber placement at the Boeing Developmental Center in Tukwila, Wash. The tank recently completed pressure tests at the Marshall Center.
Credits: Boeing

WASHINGTON -- NASA recently completed a major space technology development milestone by successfully testing a pressurized, large cryogenic propellant tank made of composite materials. The composite tank will enable the next generation of rockets and spacecraft needed for space exploration.
Cryogenic propellants are gasses chilled to subfreezing temperatures and condensed to form highly combustible liquids, providing high-energy propulsion solutions critical to future, long-term human exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Cryogenic propellants, such as liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen, traditionally have been used to provide the enormous thrust needed for large rockets and NASA's space shuttle.
In the past, propellant tanks have been fabricated out of metals. The almost 8-foot-diameter (2.4 meter) composite tank tested at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., is considered game changing because composite tanks may significantly reduce the cost and weight for launch vehicles and other space missions.
"These successful tests mark an important milestone on the path to demonstrating the composite cryogenic tanks needed to accomplish our next generation of deep space missions," said Michael Gazarik, NASA's associate administrator for space technology at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "This investment in game changing space technology will help enable NASA's exploration of deep space while directly benefiting American industrial capability in the manufacturing and use of composites."
Switching from metallic to composite construction holds the potential to dramatically increase the performance capabilities of future space systems through a dramatic reduction in weight. A potential initial target application for the composite technology is an upgrade to the upper stage of NASA's Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket.
Built by Boeing at their Tukwila, Wash., facility, the tank arrived at NASA in late 2012. Engineers insulated and inspected the tank, then put it through a series of pressurized tests to measure its ability to contain liquid hydrogen at extremely cold temperatures. The tank was cooled down to -423 degrees Fahrenheit and under went 20 pressure cycles as engineers changed the pressure up to 135 psi.
"This testing experience with the smaller tank is helping us perfect manufacturing and test plans for a much larger tank," said John Vickers, the cryogenic tank project manager at Marshall. "The 18-foot (5.5-meter) tank will be one of the largest composite propellant tanks ever built and will incorporate design features and manufacturing processes applicable to a 27.5-foot (8.4-meter) tank, the size of metal tanks found in today's large launch vehicles."
The NASA and Boeing team are in the process of manufacturing the 18-foot-diameter (5.5-meter) composite tank that also will be tested at Marshall next year.
"The tank manufacturing process represents a number of industry breakthroughs, including automated fiber placement of oven-cured materials, fiber placement of an all-composite tank wall design that is leak-tight and a tooling approach that eliminates heavy-joints," said Dan Rivera, the Boeing cryogenic tank program manager at Marshall.
Composite tank joints, especially bolted joints, have been a particularly troubling area prone to leaks in the past. Boeing and its partner, Janicki Industries of Sedro-Woolley, Wash., developed novel tooling to eliminate the need for heavy joints.
"Boeing has experience building large composite structures, and Marshall has the facilities and experience to test large tanks," explained John Fikes, the cryogenic tank deputy project manager at Marshall. "It has been a team effort, with Boeing working with NASA to monitor the tests and gather data to move forward and build even larger, higher performing tanks."
"Game changing is about developing transformative technologies that enable new missions and new capabilities," said Stephen Gaddis, the program manager for the Game Changing Development Program at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. "Technological advances like the cryogenic tank can ripple throughout the aerospace industry and change the way we do business."
View a video about cryotank manufacturing and testing here:
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NASA's cryogenic storage tank research is part of the agency's Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA's future missions. For more information about NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate, visit:
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An almost 8-foot-diameter (2.4-meter) propellant tank made of composite materials successfully completed pressurized testing at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
David E. Steitz
 

anzha

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Take EVERYTHING that the russians say about space with a massive grain of salt.

If I were the Chinese, I would not object to the Russians participating in anything. However, I would not allow them to have a controlling interest in anything. It would not be in the Chinese interest for the Russians to have the ability to veto, slow down or gum up whatever the Chinese have planned.
 

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