China Flanker Thread II


crash8pilot

Junior Member
Registered Member
pardon my ignorance in asking this stupid question.
how can the planes fly so low, seemingly only 10m or so above water surface?
is such low level flight controlled automatically by the avionics, or manually by the pilots ?
thanks in advance for the explanation.
It's based on the radio altimeter, which measures altitude directly beneath an aircraft based on how long it takes a beam of radio wave to travel to ground, reflect, and return back to the aircraft. The radio altimeter indication also appears in the cockpit Heads Up Display, and the pilot can also preset an altitude so that an aural and visual warning is triggered if he/she flies below the set altitude.
 

Totoro

Captain
VIP Professional
I do believe Argentinean pilots did not have even radio altimeters in their planes in 1982, when they flew attack sorties on British ships, flying at 15 m (some more dubious sources say 10 m) above the sea during the approach to the enemy ship.
 

Tam

Brigadier
Registered Member
I do believe Argentinean pilots did not have even radio altimeters in their planes in 1982, when they flew attack sorties on British ships, flying at 15 m (some more dubious sources say 10 m) above the sea during the approach to the enemy ship.

They can be using barometric altimeters instead.
 

sndef888

Junior Member
Registered Member
So I get that the J11/Su-27 is more of a pure air superiority fighter compared to J16/Su30MKK which is a strike fighter, but can anyone explain the actual physical differences?

Like what makes one more suited for the role than the other? I can't really tell any differences except the J11 kinda looks "slimmer" and it has one seat less?
 

Deino

Lieutenant General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Registered Member
So I get that the J11/Su-27 is more of a pure air superiority fighter compared to J16/Su30MKK which is a strike fighter, but can anyone explain the actual physical differences?

Like what makes one more suited for the role than the other? I can't really tell any differences except the J11 kinda looks "slimmer" and it has one seat less?


;)

PLAAF + PLAN NA - all Flankers - 1 fighters.jpgPLAAF + PLAN NA - all Flankers - 2 striker.jpg
 

crash8pilot

Junior Member
Registered Member
So I get that the J11/Su-27 is more of a pure air superiority fighter compared to J16/Su30MKK which is a strike fighter, but can anyone explain the actual physical differences?

Like what makes one more suited for the role than the other? I can't really tell any differences except the J11 kinda looks "slimmer" and it has one seat less?
Physically they kinda look the same, much like how a tandem seat F-15D looks a lot like an F-15E (especially when the Strike Eagle is stripped of its conformal fuel tanks).

Some mission sets favor different crew configurations. In air-to-air, the pilot could benefit from the back-seater calling out where the bogie is as he maneuvers the fighter for the kill.... but on the other hand tandem seat fighters take up weight (more weight = extra drag = plane can't maneuver to the full G limit), valuable fuel from the aircraft (decreases the fighter's time on station), which leads to the fighter not being able to fully maneuver at the edge of the designed envelope. With modern developments in radar and avionics (especially helmet mounted sight) technology, quite frankly a pilot has the tools to build a similar (if not higher) level of situational awareness on where the enemy is as well as the energy state of the aircraft he/she is flying... which is why modern air superiority fighters tend to be single seaters. That said with drone technology advancing along, we could see a tandem seat air superiority fighter where the back-seater operates smart wingman drone(s).

But in air-to-ground strike, a pilot might have his hands full flying the plane at high speeds whilst on the lookout for enemy fighters and surface threats... all while liaising with eyes in the sky and/or troops on the ground, operating avionics + targeting pod(s) to designate a target, and then drop a bomb or missile on it - under such scenario a pilot can find his situational awareness and workload management maxed out, and why he/she could benefit from a back-seater working the avionics and targeting pods so that the pilot can focus on flying the plane.
 

TheObserver

Junior Member
Registered Member
What's the difference again between J-11B and J-11BH? is the former for PLAAF and the latter for PLANAF? Are there actually any physical differences between the two or it's just different designations?
 

Deino

Lieutenant General
Staff member
Super Moderator
Registered Member
What's the difference again between J-11B and J-11BH? is the former for PLAAF and the latter for PLANAF? Are there actually any physical differences between the two or it's just different designations?

Yes, plain and simple. The additional letter H symbolises "hai" aka Naval - I'm sure a native speaker will provide a better translation! - and at least externally they are not different, only by their colour scheme.
 

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