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Scratch

Captain
Well, I'm not aware of any ICAO induced change in communication protocol in 2008, or any other year for that matter. My understanding was that ATC works in english simply due to the very international nature of aviation. Even if there's national flight also, they will be on the same frequency as the international flights for any given area. In such an environment it's actually detrimental to flight safety, IMO, to have different languages on the same freq.

Military flights, probably depending on national protocol, may very well also be on civilian ATC freqs for transits, so they'll have to go english, too.
Now for a combat environment, a lot is dependent on training. If your complete pilot training from the beginning to being certified, is done in english, then this will offset a lot of these language issues. If your in a purely national environment, you of course always have the option of falling back to your native language when needed.
Again, I can't specificly comment on japanese practices here, or the difficulties of japanese speakers with the english language.

Many NATO countries for example train their pilots in combined programs (like ENJJPT in the US). There are mixed classses of students with instructors from the participating nations as well. All the training is done in english, even national spin-up training.
That means at some point you'll know the proper technical terms of your trade in nglish, but wouldn't know the proper word for it in your native language.
Now the french are of course, the french ... :) I think they have a national training program for their pilots (I believe the Belgians participate as well). They may be talking a bit more in their language during classes and flights. And I have a feeling they do a bit more of their tactical stuff in french, too. But then again, they're off course paticipating in international training and excercises just the same and all goes fine.
 

kriss

Junior Member
Registered Member
Just one more thing, did eastern bloc pilots in cold war speak russian (russian being international language in air on the east side)? Cause it's hard to imagine russian pilots speak english, same goes for other air force not working with or hostile to nato.
 

delft

Brigadier
Well, I'm not aware of any ICAO induced change in communication protocol in 2008, or any other year for that matter. My understanding was that ATC works in english simply due to the very international nature of aviation. Even if there's national flight also, they will be on the same frequency as the international flights for any given area. In such an environment it's actually detrimental to flight safety, IMO, to have different languages on the same freq.
Quite right, Scratch. I remember reading long ago that civil aviation pilots complained that they couldn't understand what a French traffic controller said to a French pilot and that that endangered themselves and their colleagues. The article also referred to other countries acting similarly.
This was after the RAF ended the practice of keeping low fly routes secret which resulted in the collision of a jet with an agricultural aircraft over East Anglia.
Looking back one can be amazed by dangerous practices of yesteryear and wonder what may still be going on.
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
Just one more thing, did eastern bloc pilots in cold war speak russian (russian being international language in air on the east side)? Cause it's hard to imagine russian pilots speak english, same goes for other air force not working with or hostile to nato.
Soviet Ground intercept controllers spoke Russian to there pilots at least during the 1980s. They probably still do today.
 

lcloo

Junior Member
Can anyone identified this tank? These are old pictures of a tank on trial in Probably UAE. It looks like a variant of French Leclerc but the driver's position is at the centre, it also looked different from the Leclerc tanks in service with UAE.
11f79536798g215.jpg 11f79539249g213.jpg
 

TerraN_EmpirE

Tyrant King
Challenger 1 hull with a Jordanian Falcon turret. The challenger 1 is a surplus British Main Battle Tank that thought fin in theory suffered due to the advent of new fire control systems in the late 1980s. The British redesigned the whole tank building the Challenger 2 but not before the Gulf war. After the war and with the new Challenger 2 on the way the Brits sold off there Challenger 1 tanks to Jordan. The Jordanians at the turn of the millennium decided to look into a means of upgrading the effectiveness of their tank fleets a mix of Challenger 1, M60 and Chieftain.
Study of there situation determined that there first issue was logistics. These three tanks all fire different rounds. 120mm rifled for Chieftain Challenger, 105mm rifled for M60 . If they could cut down to one tank gun that would save cash. They chose the Ruag L50 52caliber smooth bore main gun. This gave them the added ability to use modern fin stabilized sabot rounds vs the lower velocity version in the M60A3 main gun or the HESH rounds in the British Rifled 120mm.
Then they needed a new turret to mount it in. After studying battles, options and tech they decided to be audacious.
The Turret is unmanned fed by a autoloader. The crew sits in a armored compartment in the turret basket over them are hatches that allows egress on either side of the turret. The turret uses a Automatic loader and stores rounds in the Bustle which has blowout panels. However a comprise was made in this choice.
The bustle only houses about a 17 rounds so the fighting compartment has a more ammo stored in it. If the compartment was breached the Ammo would likely explode. The Jordanians however argue that by using a low profile turret and sinking the fighting compartment into the hull so deep as well as armoring it they mitigated the chances as a enemy round would have to penetrate the hull and basket. The additional rounds can be loaded into the auto loader from below.
the turret also has a 7.62mm coax and may have provisions for a remote weapons station. The commanders sight is mounted on top of the turret allowing a uninstructed view the gunners is on the left side of the turret and bore sighted with the main gun.
Other than ammo storage this is a rather impressive machine. The Falcon turret was supposed to be compatible with the M60 and Other Jordanian MBTs, allowing them or any one with the turret to rapidly refurbish older models to modern tech quite quickly.
If they could get more ammo stored away from the fighting compartment perhaps it might even find its way into future upgrades of Challenger2 MBTS.
 
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strehl

Junior Member
Registered Member
Have there been any/many complaints of copyright infringement for pictures/videos posted to this site? Is the policy to simply delete the posts?
 

Jeff Head

General
Staff member
Super Moderator
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
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Have there been any/many complaints of copyright infringement for pictures/videos posted to this site? Is the policy to simply delete the posts?
When we get specific complaints we look at them. If there is ANY support for their claim we delete the posts where the copyright infringement occurs.

We have had it a very few times fro pictures and for material.

Depending on the infraction, an SD member who does such a thing can be warned, suspended, or banned.
 

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